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Archive for the ‘Architecture’ Category

a1209_ekeberg

Although both the babe and the car is very interesting, the most interesting thing in the photography is the restaurant; The Ekeberg Restaurant in Oslo. The restaurant has a marvellous view of Oslo city and the hills surrounding it and it is one of the most famous buildings from it’s period in Europe.

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Topimage found on citroenladies

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Elvis’ Palm Springs Honeymoon Home for Sale

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The ultimate Elvis pad is now up for sale in sunny Palm Springs, California – complete with Rock ‘n’ Roll memorabilia. In 1962, Look Magazine featured the estate calling it the “House of Tomorrow” due to its forward-thinking decor. Oh, and Lisa Marie was most likely conceived here. In 1966 this historic mid-century house was leased to Elvis Presley and Priscilla for around $21,000 to spend their honeymoon. The original lease actually still hangs on one of the walls. The house is designed around four perfect circles on three levels and features four bedrooms and five bathrooms. It is nestled in at the base of the San Jacinto Mountains which the honeymoon suite offers a panoramic view of. There is also a pool, tennis court and a fruit orchard among many other features.

The house is currently owned by ‘Elvis junkie’ M.L. Lewis which purchased it in 1987 for under $500,000. It has since then been restored to its 1960s splendor and features art deco design and furnishings throughout. The house is currently a museum, open to tourists on the weekends and comes packed with various Elvis memorabilia – which the buyer gets to keep. Fans might recognize it from the film “Elvis And Me” and the documentary “Elvis By the Presley”, starring Priscilla Presley herself. So any Elvis fan with a really deep pocket who’s in the market for the ultimate Elvis Presley time-capsule will most likely have found the best one around. More information about this property can be found the real estate agent Hilton & Hyland.

Text and image from UltraSwank 

Nice pad, but there are actually not one real Art Deco object in sight – Ted

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The mad men knew their trade back in the twenties and thirties too. And this particular lure works just as well to day. Tell people that they can get slim by doing nothing but popping a pill or two and you got them hooked. Promise no starving diets and no taxing exercises and people will head for their druggist to day as well no matter what the remedy costs or what it contains. People were fools back then and people are fools now. And the mad men now as then are laughing all the way to the bank – Ted

By the way, how can you grow slim 😉

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410_blackpool_tower

Blackpool Tower is a tourist attraction in Blackpool, Lancashire in England which was opened to the public on 14 May 1894. (grid reference SD 306,360). Inspired by the Eiffel Tower in Paris, it rises to 518 feet 9 inches (158.12 metres). The tower is a Grade I listed building.

Construction
The Blackpool Tower Company was founded by London based Standard Contract & Debenture Corporation in 1890, when it bought an Aquarium on Central Promenade with the intention of building a replica Eiffel Tower on the 410_blackpool_tower2site. John Bickerstaffe, a former Mayor of Blackpool, was asked to become Chairman of the new company and its shares went on sale in July 1891. The Standard Corporation kept 30,000 £1 shares for itself and offered £150,000 worth of shares to the public, although initially only two-thirds of these shares were taken up. This lack of interest forced the Tower Company to ask for further cash contributions from its existing shareholders, but the poor financial situation of the Standard Corporation, worsened by the falling share price, rendered it unable to pay. Bickerstaffe’s remedy for the potential collapse of the venture was to buy any shares available, until his original holding of £500 amounted to £20,000. He also released the Standard Corporation from their share commitments. When the Tower opened in 1894 its success justified the overall investment of nearly £300,000, and the Company made a £30,000 profit in 1896.

Two Lancashire architects, James Maxwell and Charles Tuke, designed the Tower and oversaw the laying of its foundation stone, on 29 September 1891 with a time capsule buried beneath it. By the time the Tower finally opened on 14 May 1894, both men had died. Heenan & Froude of Worcester were appointed structural engineers, supplying and constructing both the main tower, the electric lighting and the steel front pieces for the aquariums. A new system of hydraulic riveting was used, based on the technology of Fielding & Platt of Gloucester.

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The total cost for the design and construction of the tower and buildings was about £290,000. Five million bricks, 2,500 tonnes of iron and 93 tonnes of cast steel were used to construct the tower. Unlike the Eiffel Tower, Blackpool Tower is not free-standing. Its base is hidden by the building which houses Blackpool Tower Circus. The building occupies a total of 5,050 square metres (54,400 sq ft). At the summit of the tower there is a flagpole.

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

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294_tkiosk

These red telephone booths has become a landmark in Norway and has its own national conservation plan. It saw the light in 1933 after an architectural competition , which was won by architect Georg Fasting from Bergen. The first was set up at the America boat docks in Oslo. A restored version is currently set up at near it’s original place (see picture). Only after the war did they spread  to the rest of the country. The location of public telephone booths always took into account the public safety and should provide easy access to a doctor, midwife, police and fire departments. They were of course a natural among high rises in the 60’s satellite towns, railway stations and numerous ferry ports. The public telephone booths was primarily a service, and profitability was secondary. The last booth was produced in 1995. In total it has been produced about 6,000 of them, and many are still in use. The design has remained unchanged, except for the weight: The first booths weighed 800 kg , while later editions weighed less than half . As mentioned it has now been developed a special protection plan for these telephone booths.

Text (translated) and image (slightly coloured) from NostalgiSiden

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The Brayton Theatre on Atlantic Boulevard,  Long Beach opened in July 1925. After it closed in the early-1950’s, it reopened for a while showing serials etc on Saturday & Sunday mornings. It then closed for good. In 1967 it was reopened as part of the War on Poverty as a Teen Post, teaching acting skills to youngsters in the neighborhood. It was later torn down to make way for a Filipino church.

Image and text found on cinematreasures.org

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196_lady_shatleyBookshops all over England have sold out of Penguin’s first run of the controversial novel Lady Chatterley’s Lover – a total of 200,000 copies – on the first day of publication. DH Lawrence’s sexually explicit novel was published in Italy in 1928 and in Paris the following year. It has been banned in the UK – until now.

Last month, after a dramatic and much-publicised trial, Penguin won the right to publish the book in its entirety. For those who can manage to find a copy, it is available in paperback for 3s 6d.

Rush to buy
London’s largest bookstore, W&G Foyle Ltd, said its 300 copies had gone in just 15 minutes and it had taken orders for 3,000 more copies. When the shop opened this morning there were 400 people – mostly men – waiting to buy the unexpurgated version of the book.

Hatchards in Piccadilly sold out in 40 minutes and also had hundreds of orders pending. Selfridges sold 250 copies in minutes. A spokesman told the Times newspaper, "It’s bedlam here. We could have sold 10,000 copies if we had had them."

Lady C, as it has become known, has also become a bestseller in the Midlands and the North where demand has been described as "terrific".

Novel on trial
The book tells of Lady Chatterley’s passionate affair with Mellors, the family gamekeeper, and details their erotic meetings.

 Last year the government introduced the Obscene Publications Act that said that any book considered obscene by some but that could be shown to have "redeeming social merit" might still published.

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This prompted Penguin to print off and store 200,000 copies with the aim of completing a set of works by DH Lawrence to commemorate the 30th anniversary of his death this year. Penguin sent 12 copies to the Director of Public Prosecutions challenging him to prosecute, which he duly did.

The six-day trial at the Old Bailey began on 27 October and gripped the nation. The defence produced 35 witnesses, including bishops and leading literary figures, such as Dame Rebecca West, EM Forster and Richard Hoggart.

The prosecution was unable to make a substantial case against the novel and at one point prosecution counsel Mervyn Griffith-Jones shocked the jury by asking: "Is it a book you would wish your wife or servants to read?"

In Context
Within a year Lady Chatterley’s Lover had sold two million copies, outselling even the Bible. The famous trial of Lady Chatterley was not only a victory for Penguin but for all British publishers, as from then on it became much more difficult to prosecute on grounds of obscenity.

The likes of Mary Whitehouse and her National Viewers’ and Listeners’ Association founded in 1964 turned their attention to violent and sexual scenes broadcast on television and in film. The Broadcasting Standards Council was set up in 1988 to monitor taste and decency.

In 1993 the BBC dramatised Lady Chatterley’s Lover in a film directed by Ken Russell although the more explicit scenes were toned down.

Text from BBCs On This Day

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