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Albert Joseph Pénot
(1862–1930) was a French painter known for female nudes. Today, he is more popularly and specifically recognized for a subset of paintings centring on women of darker, more macabre themes.

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Styles and themes

Pénot was concerned first and foremost with anatomically accurate portrayals of women. Singular female forms were the implicit focus of his work, whereas the worlds surrounding his characters are seldom realized beyond misty atmospheres and patches of shadow and light. Environments are incidental and are typically shrouded in haze, giving the figures themselves explicit priority. However, Pénot was more versatile in his artistry, and was not confined exclusively to female nudes: church figures were another of his subjects, in addition to occasional compositions depicting scenes of men and women from high society in narratives framed by more conventional settings.

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Sir Frank Brangwyn (1867-1956) is perhaps best remembered for his murals. He also did easel paintings and posters, many of the latter in support of Britain’s effort in the Great War.

But that was not all. For a while in the 1920s he created a few posters for what became the London and North Eastern Railway, a major line that ran trains from London into Scotland along a route near the eastern coast of the island. (The London, Midland and Scottish followed a more westerly path north, while the Great Western and Southern railroads served other locations.)

At the time Brangwyn created the designs shown below, a trend toward simplified images was getting underway. Perhaps because Brangwyn was probably incapable of delivering a simplified image, his career in railroad poster making was comparatively brief.

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Text and images from artcontrarian

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Gil Elvgren (March 15, 1914 – February 29, 1980), born Gillette Elvgren in Saint Paul, Minnesota, was an American painter of pin-up girls, advertising and illustration. Elvgren was one of the most important pin-up and glamour artists of the twentieth century. Today he is best known for his pin-up paintings for Brown & Bigelow. Elvgren studied at the American Academy of Art.

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a12073_Lecomte du Nouÿ_01Jean-Jules-Antoine Lecomte du Nouÿ (Paris 10 June 1842 – 19 February 1923 Paris) was an Orientalist French painter and sculptor. He was strongly influenced by the works and teachings of Charles Gleyre and Jean-Léon Gérôme. Lecomte du Nouÿ found inspiration for his art through extensive travels to Greece, Turkey, Egypt and Italy. The thematic content of Lecomte du Nouÿ’s work was mainly figural, but also spanned over a vast range of imagery throughout his career, including classical, historical and religious.

Lecomte du Nouÿ is known for remaining faithful to his detailed, realistic style throughout the extent of his career, despite the onset of the Impressionist, Fauvist and Constructivist artistic movements during his lifetime. His work is said to have contributed significantly to the establishment of an iconic repertoire representing the Orient in the nineteenth century. A Parisian street was named after him in 1932.

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Maturity and Travels

In 1865, Jean-Jules-Antoine accompanied fellow artist, Félix-Auguste Clément (fr), on his travels to Cairo, Egypt. It was after this voyage that the young Lecompte du Nouy sought to portray the opulence of the Orient. In later years, Jean continued his travels, visiting countries like Italy and Greece. Lecompte du Nouy found inspiration in all social, historical and literary facets of foreign culture.

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Artistic Style

The Orientalist style is largely characterized by its content, but also by its subdued realism and precision allotted towards depicting the human form. The latter is a prominent characteristic of the 19th century methods upheld by the Académie des Beaux-Arts. Jean-Jules-Antoine was a prominent figure within the sphere of academic art and thereby would adhere to a rule-based artistic style of well-developed skill and formal composition. The artistic composition of Lecomte du Nouy’s paintings was often complemented by the use of half-light, which added certain dramatic and melancholic qualities to his work. To this day some, like Professor Alan Braddock, consider Jean-Jules-Antoine to have been decidedly modern for his time, because his work directly and indirectly broached some of the key issues of his day, albeit from a decidedly conservative perspective: colonialism, international trade, gender, religion, and history.

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Dean Yeagle is an American animator and cartoonist, born in 1950 in the United States, known for his character ‘Mandy’, who has frequented the pages of Playboy Magazine.

a12066_Dean Yeagle_01As a young Disney fan, Yeagle set his sights on becoming an animator for Disney around the age of 10. During this time he often drew Disney characters, but later began to develop his own.

After graduating from high school, Yeagle went to art school, leaving after a year. He began his animation career in a small studio in Philadelphia with a summer job, giving him his first taste of the industry. He served four years in the Navy during the Vietnam era, and later worked for Jack Zander (who once animated Tom and Jerry cartoons for MGM) in Zander’s Animation Parlour, New York.

Seven years after starting at Zander’s Animation Parlour, Yeagle began freelancing, working for most of the New York animation studios before starting his own, Caged Beagle Productions, in 1986 with Nancy Beiman. Caged Beagle produces TV commercials, CD-ROMs, sub-contracts or consults on features and character design.

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Yeagle has worked as a designer, animator and director, and he was nominated by the National Cartoonist Society (NCS) for the 2003 Gag Award for his work in Playboy Magazine.

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Clients have included Blue Sky Studios, Brøderbund, Dannon, Grey Advertising, Hanna-Barbera, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, ImaginEngine, Kraft, Marvel Comics,Nestle, Playboy Enterprises, Procter & Gamble, Random House, Saatchi & Saatchi, Walt Disney Productions, Warner Bros. and Western Publishing.

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Text from Wikipedia

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Karl Albert Buehr
(1866–1952) was a painter born in Germany.

Buehr was born in Feuerbach – near Stuttgart. He was the son of Frederick Buehr and Henrietta Doh (Dohna?). He moved to Chicago with his parents and siblings in the 1880s. In Chicago, young Karl worked at various jobs until he was employed by a lithograph company near the Art Institute of Chicago. Introduced to art at work, Karl paid regular visits to the Art Institute, where he found part-time employment, enabling him to enroll in night classes. Later, working at the Institute as a night watchman, he had a unique opportunity to study the masters and actually posted sketchings that blended in favorably with student’s work. Having studied under John H. Vanderpoel, Buehr graduated with honors, while his work aroused such admiration that he was offered a teaching post there, which he maintained for many years thereafter. He graduated from the Art Inst. of Chicago and served in the IL Cav in the Spanish–American War. Mary Hess became Karl’s wife—she was a student of his and an accomplished artist in her own right. In 1922, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate member.

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Art Studies in Europe

In 1904, Buehr received a bronze medal at the St. Louis Universal Exposition, then, in 1905, Buehr and his family moved to France, thanks to a wealthy Chicago patron, and they spent the following year in Taormina, Sicily, where the artist painted local subjects, executing both genre subjects and landscapes as well as time in Venice. Buehr spent at least some time in Paris, where he worked with Raphaël Collin at the Académie Julian.

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Giverny and American Impressionism

Prior to this time, Buehr had developed a quasi-impressionistic style, but after 1909, when he began spending summers near Monet in Giverny, his work became decidedly characteristic of that plein-air style but he began focusing on female subjects posed out-of-doors. He remained for some time in Giverny, and here he became well-acquainted with other well known expatriate America impressionists such as Richard Miller, Theodore Earl Butler, Frederick Frieseke, and Lawton Parker. It seems likely that Buehr met Monet, since his own daughter Kathleen and Monet’s granddaughter, Lili Butler, were playmates, according to George Buehr, the painter’s son. His other daughter Lydia died before adulthood due to diabetes. He returned to Chicago at the onset of World War I and taught at The Art Inst for many years. One of his noted pupils at the Art Institute was Archibald Motley, Jr. the famous African American “Harlem” Renaissance painters. Motley credits Buehr with being one of his finest teachers and one who encouraged his style.

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Alexander Rothaug (* 13 March 1870 in Vienna ; † 5 March 1946 ibid; Complete name: Alexander Theodor Rothaug) was an Austrian painter and illustrator.

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Life

Rothaug Alexander was born in 1870 as the son of Theodor Rothaug and Karoline Rothaug (born bird). The maternal ancestors were also painters and sculptors. With the older brother Leopold Rothaug Alexander received his first painting lessons from his father Theodore.

In 1884 he began an apprenticeship as a sculptor at Johann Schindler (1822-1893), however, changed in 1885 at the Vienna Academy of Arts to assist in August Eisenmenger , Christian Griepenkerl and Franz Rumpler to study painting. Important influence as a teacher was also the Orient painter Leopold Carl Müller , in which Alexander Rothaug studied until his death in 1892.

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In 1892 he moved to Munich, where he as an illustrator for the humorous magazine Fliegende Blätter worked. In 1896 he married Ottilie Lauterkorn. He undertook study trips to Dalmatia , Italy and complaints . In May 1910 he became a member of the Association of Visual Artists Vienna. 1911 appears in the magazine Art Review,an extensive article about Alexander Rothaug.  In 1912 he holds at the invitation of the Archduke Ludwig Salvator on Mallorca on. Rothaug published on this stay the publication "Sketches from Miramar".

1933 Alexander Rothaug published under the title "statics and dynamics of the human body" in the form of a loose-leaf collection of 10 sheets a systematization of the human body in terms of a theory of proportion . He has also written a 38-page treatise entitled "The knowledge in painting" with the tripartite Appendix "thoughts about the art and the artist."

His honorary dedicated grave is located on the Grinzinger Cemetery (Group 15, number 1, number 2) in Vienna.

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Text from Wikipedia

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