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Archive for the ‘Holidays’ Category

In this story from Mining Review 2nd Year No.12, we join Durham miner Tom McDonagh, his wife and their triplets on a family break to Butlin’s holiday camp in Filey, North Yorkshire. The very first Butlin’s opened 75 years ago in Skegness, with Filey following in 1945 after postponement during WWII. All the communal games and activities you would expect of this classic British holiday are here, introduced by a suitably jolly narrator, but as you may notice poor Mum hasn’t quite escaped the domestic drudgery.

Text and movie from British Film Institute BFI’s Youtube pages

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cover_nyere_flatBack in 2013 I posted a series of posts based on the 1930 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s “ Illustrated Guide Book to London”. For those who have followed this blog for a while it should come as no surprise that I also have in my possession the 1910 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s illustrated guide book for the same city. And just for the record, I have the 1948 and 1956 editions too.

This will be the first post based on the 1910 edition which is surprisingly enough more richly illustrated than the one from 1930. And we start of course with the introduction and work our way through the most interesting parts of the book – Ted

 

Hotels & Tariffs

Notwithstanding the enormous increase during the last few years in the number and capacity of London hotels, the resources of the metropolis are in summer severely taxed by the ever-increasing army of visitors from the Continent, the Colonies, and the provinces. London, long supreme in size and commercial importance, has within the last decade or so confounded her detractors by proving herself easily first as a pleasure resort also.

It may be doubted whether all the holiday places of the South Coast together have within the year so many visitors as the dull town whose own inhabitants are so eager to get away from her. The visitor who is Wise will-particularly in August and September-endeavour to make his arrangements for accommodation before arrival. An enquiry addressed to any of the establishments named in the following list will bring full particulars and save possible disappointment.

The tariffs have been obtained directly from the proprietors, but we can accept no responsibility for their accuracy. Prices are, moreover, liable to fluctuate according to season. Travellers who only wish to spend a night or two in London will perhaps find the Railway Hotels adjoining the various terminals convenient :–

 

Private and Temperance Hotels and Boarding Houses.

Private Hotels are those not licensed for the sale of Wine, spirits, or beer. Boarding Houses are principally to be found in the Bloomsbury quarter, but there are many others in the attractive outer suburbs, such as Hampstead, Bayswater, Dulwich, etc.

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Good “board and lodging” is offered by these establishments at from 3 5.9. to 55s. a week. For private apartments the average charge in Bloomsbury may be taken at about 21 s. a room per week, or in West End streets off Piccadilly double that figure. Advertisements of furnished apartments and lodging-houses will be found in the daily newspapers.

Restaurants

Recent years have witnessed a remarkable change in the habits of London society, and public restaurants are used for many luncheon, dinner and supper parties that would formerly have been given at home. The fastidious diner-out may glean some interesting and profitable information concerning London restaurants from Lieut.-Colonel Newnham-Davis’s “Dínners and Diners”.

The hard-set traveller who tries on arrival the restaurants of Messrs. J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., or Messrs. Spiers and Pond at the chief railway termini is not likely to have cause for complaint. The principal hotels generally either have restaurants attached or are glad to welcome non-residents at the table d’hôte.

The traveller will have no difficulty in finding for himself scores of  establishments, providing excellent fare. It may be said of many of the first class
restaurants that they are not so expensive as they look; and humble mortals who are content with a “grill" or other simple dishes, will pay no more than they would have to do elsewhere.

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The sightseer who happens to be in the suburbs at the hour of the midday or evening meal must generally consider himself fortunate if he comes across any eating-house other than a coffee-shop or a public-house. The numerous establishments of Slaters’ Ltd., J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., Lipton’s, Ltd., and other similar companies, supply a very fair luncheon or dinner for 1s. 64. to 2s. ; while fare of a lighter kind, including soups, cold meat, etc., can be had at the shops of the Aärated Bread Co., Ltd., J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., and others. Most of these now supply breakfasts also.

Visitors who are making the round of the Museums at South Kensington will find an excellent restaurant and grill-room at the Victoria and Albert Museum, near the entrance from Exhibition Road. There are also restaurants at the Natural History Museum, the British Museum, the Tate Gallery, and other showplaces.

Ladies shopping at any of the large drapery establishments, such as Marshall and Snelgrove’s, Selfridge’s, Swan and Edgar’s, Peter Robinson’s, Harrods’, Shoolbreds’, Gamage’s,or the Stores, will find excellent luncheon and tea-rooms on the premises.

The object of providing these conveniences being to attract and keep customers the fare is always of the best, and the prices are often below those charged outside.

The luncheons (1s. 6d.) and dinners (2s. 6d.) served at some of the foreign restaurants in the neighbourhood of Soho are astonishingly cheap. It is usual in all restaurants to tip the waiter or waitress about Id. per shilling in the bill (ad. per is. in the higher class places). In the establishments of the Aärated Bread Co., Ltd., J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., and some others “ no tips " is the golden rule.

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West-End Restaurants

Many restaurants, notably those under foreign management. are open on Sunday afternoon and evening, the usual hours being from 6 to 11 p.m., sometimes also from I to 3 p.m.

City Restaurants.

The City is noted for old-fashioned taverns, and others with old names but ‘new-fashioned’ styles. In some a speciality is made of particular dishes on certain days.

Among City men it is a common practice to adjourn after luncheon for “coffee and smoke," chess, dominoes, etc., to one of the subterranean establishments of Ye Mensa, Ltd., or their competitors.

Tea Rooms

The establishments, already referred to, of the Aärated Broad Co., Ltd., J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., Slaters, Ltd., the Cabins, Ltd., Lipton’s, Ltd., and others are to be found in all the principal West End and City thoroughfares, and seem to increase in number almost weekly.

Cup of tea or coffee, freshly made for each customer, 2d. and 3d. ; roll, or cut bread, and butter, 2d.; cake or pastries, 1d. and 2d. –

Of late many tea rooms of a higher grade, artistically decorated and with waitresses in fancy costume, have sprung up in the West End, notably in and around Bond Street. There are also the well-managed tea rooms connected with the large drapery establishments.

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Back in 2013 I posted a series of posts based on the 1930 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s “ Illustrated Guide Book to London”. For those who have followed this blog for a while it should come as no surprise that I also have in my possession the 1910 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s illustrated guide book for the same city. And just for the record, I have the 1948 and 1956 editions too.

This will be the first post based on the 1910 edition which is surprisingly enough more richly illustrated than the one from 1930. And we start of course with the introduction and work our way through the most interesting parts of the book – Ted 

Introduction

cover_ny_flat"That London. which is the pride and the problem of our race." -Lord Roseberry

No words could better serve as introduction to a Guide to London than those of Heine : “ I have seen the greatest wonder which the world can show to the astonished spirit. I have seen it, and am more astonished than ever–and still there remains in my memory that stone forest of houses, and amid them the rushing stream of faces, of living human faces, with all their motley passions, all their terrible impulses of love, of hunger, and of hate."

In this volume we can attempt only to direct the stranger’s footsteps through the “stone forest of houses"  "the  rushing stream of faces ”–with which no building can compare in interest–he must study for himself. Certainly in no city of ancient or modern days has there been such “fullness of life” as that which crowds the streets of the Metropolis at this period of our history, and if Dr. Johnson were alive to-day we can well believe that he would enjoy the traditional “walk down Fleet Street" With even more than his accustomed relish.

The Sightseer’s London

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Although the Metropolis is so vast that it would take the best part of a lifetime to traverse its 10,000 streets, and another lifetime to know intimately every part of the suburbs, the features of interest appealing especially to sightseers are, with few exceptions, confined to a central area, for the most part north of the Thames, measuring roughly some five miles from west to east, and three from north to south. We are far indeed from saying that there is not anything of interest outside this area, but we do say that the visitor, however hardy and determined, who has methodically and conscientiously “done” the orthodox sights, and taken a trip or two by way of relaxation to places like Windsor and Hampton Court, will have little heart or shoe-leather left for Islington and Kilburn, and other places in the “Middle Ring" unless the calls of business or of friendship lure him thither. We have accordingly dealt fully with the West End and the City, and outlined all the principal excursions; but the reader who is in search of detailed information respecting London’s suburban dormitories and nurseries must, we fear, be referred to volumes of greater capacity. We have done our best to squeeze a quart-  ought we not rather to say a hogshead? -into a pint pot, but something has perforce been spilt in the process.

London at a Glance

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It will greatly assist the stranger to keep his bearings in the crowded streets of Central London if he forms at the outset a mental picture of the direction and intersections of the principal thoroughfares. To this end we have prepared a special sketch map showing “ London at a Glance,“ believing that this will be more helpful than pages of elaborate directions. Bear in mind that the river runs from west to east, with a syphon-like northward bend from Vauxhall Bridge to Waterloo; and that the two chief thoroughfares, Oxford Street with its continuations, and the Strand with its continuations, follow approximately the same course from west to east, eventually meeting at the Bank of England. Connection north and south between these two great thoroughfares is provided by Regent Street in the west; by Kingsway and Aldwych, between Holborn and the Strand; and by Chancery Lane at the City boundary.

 

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“From the top of a ‘Bus, Gentlemen"

“The way to see London", said Mr. W. E. Gladstone once to some American tourists, “ is from the top of a bus- the top of a ‘bus, gentlemen." A shilling or two judiciously invested in penny and two penny fares will enable all the main thorough-fares to be traversed, and a much wider range of view will be secured than would be possible from a cab or carriage. The destinations of the various lines of omnibuses are clearly shown on the front and rear, and the chief places passed en route on the panels. Care should be taken to ascertain whether the omnibus is going to or from the point the visitor is desirous of reaching.

 

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I’,m afraid you’re going to have to wait a while for the midnight sun. I didn’t realise that this was a created playlist. Make yourself a cup of coffee, loosen your tie and prepare for a round trip of Europe 😉

Movie found on travelfilmarchive on Youtube

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Imperial Airways
was the early British commercial long range air transport company, operating from 1924 to 1939 and serving parts of Europe but principally the British Empire routes to South Africa, India and the Far East, including Malaya and Hong Kong. There were local partnership companies; Qantas (Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services Ltd) in Australia and TEAL (Tasman Empire Airways Ltd) in New Zealand.

a12089_imp_air_06Imperial Airways was merged into the British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) in 1939, which in turn merged with the British European Airways Corporation to form British Airways.

Background

The establishment of Imperial Airways occurred in the context of facilitating overseas settlement by making travel to and from the colonies quicker, and that flight would also speed up colonial government and trade that was until then dependent upon ships. The launch of the airline followed a burst of air route survey in the British Empire after the First World War, and after some experimental (and often dangerous) long-distance flying to the margins of Empire.

Empire services

Route proving

Between 16 November 1925 and 13 March 1926 Alan Cobham made an Imperial Airways’ route survey flight from the UK to Cape Town and back in the Armstrong Siddeley Jaguar–powered de Havilland DH.50J floatplane G-EBFO. The outward route was London– Paris– Marseille– Pisa– Taranto– Athens– Sollum– Cairo– Luxor– Assuan– Wadi- Halfa– Atbara– Khartoum– Malakal– Mongalla– Jinja– Kisumu– Tabora– Abercorn– Ndola– BrokenHill– Livingstone– Bulawayo– Pretoria– Johannesburg– Kimberley– Blomfontein– Cape Town. On his return Cobham was awarded the Air Force Cross for his services to aviation.

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On 30 June 1926 Alan Cobham took off from the River Medway at Rochester in G-EBFO to make an Imperial Airways route survey for a service to Melbourne, arriving on 15 August. He left Melbourne on 29 August and, after completing 28,000 miles in 320 hours flying time over 78 days, he alighted on the Thames at Westminster on 1 October. Cobham was met by the Secretary of State for Air, Sir Samuel Hoare, and was subsequently knighted by HM King George V.

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27 December 1926 Imperial Airways de Havilland DH.66 Hercules G-EBMX City of Delhi left Croydon for a survey flight to India. The flight reached Karachi on 6 a12089_imp_air_07January and Delhi on 8 January. The aircraft was named by Lady Irwin, wife of the Viceroy, on 10 January 1927. The return flight left on 1 February 1927 and arrived at Heliopolis, Cairo on 7 February. The flying time from Croydon to Delhi was 62 hours 27 minutes and Delhi to Heliopolis 32 hours 50 minutes.

Short Empire Flying Boats

In 1937 with the introduction of Short Empire flying boats built at Short Brothers, Imperial Airways could offer a through-service from Southampton to the Empire. The journey to the Cape was via Marseille, Rome, Brindisi, Athens, Alexandria, Khartoum, Port Bell, Kisumu and onwards by land-based craft to Nairobi, Mbeya and eventually Cape Town. Survey flights were also made across the Atlantic and to New Zealand. By mid-1937 Imperial had completed its thousandth service to the Empire. Starting in 1938 Empire flying boats also flew between Britain and Australia via India and the Middle East.

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In March 1939 three Shorts a week left Southhampton for Australia, reaching Sydney after ten days of flying and nine overnight stops. Three more left for South Africa, taking six flying days to Durban.

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Air Mail

Flown cover carried around the world on PAA Boeing 314 Clippers and Imperial Airways Short S23 flying boats 24 June-28 July 1939

In 1934 the Government began negotiations with Imperial Airways to establish a service (Empire Air Mail Scheme) to carry mail by air on routes served by the airline. Indirectly these negotiations led to the dismissal in 1936 of Sir Christopher Bullock, thePermanent Under-Secretary at the Air Ministry, who was found by a Board of Inquiry to have abused his position in seeking a position on the board of the company while these negotiations were in train. The Government, including the Prime Minister, regretted the decision to dismiss him, later finding that, in fact, no corruption was alleged and sought Bullock’s reinstatement which he declined.

The Empire Air Mail Programme began in July 1937, delivering anywhere for 1½ d./oz. By mid-1938 a hundred tons of mail had been delivered to India and a similar amount to Africa. In the same year, construction was started on the Empire Terminal in Victoria, London, designed by A. Lakeman and with a statue by Eric Broadbent, Speed Wings Over the World gracing the portal above the main entrance. From the terminal there were train connections to Imperial’s flying boats at Southampton and coaches to its landplane base at Croydon Airport. The terminal operated as recently as 1980.

To help promote use of the Air Mail service, in June and July 1939, Imperial Airways participated with Pan American Airways in providing a special “around the world” service; Imperial carried the souvenir mail from Foynes, Ireland, to Hong Kong, out of the eastbound New York to New York route.

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Captain H.W.C. Alger and his wife

Pan American provided service from New York to Foynes (departing 24 June, via the first flight of Northern FAM 18) and Hong Kong to San Francisco (via FAM 14), and United Airlines carried it on the final leg from San Francisco to New York, arriving on 28 July.

Captain H.W.C. Alger was the pilot for the inaugural air mail flight carrying mail from England to Australia for the first time on the Short Empire flying boat Castor for Imperial Airways’ Empires Air Routes, in 1937.

Text from Wikipedia

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…… with a couple of hundred hours work 🙂

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Marion Steaming on Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond is the largest expanse of freshwater in the British Isles. The loch is 22½ miles long, its greatest breadth near the southern extremity is about 5 miles and its greatest depth 623 feet. The River Falloch enters Loch Lomond from Glen Falloch at the head of the loch and the River Endrick near Balmaha in the south-east. At Balloch which is situated on the southern shore, the River Leven connects the loch to the Firth of Clyde. The Loch Lomond steamers apart from the second-hand P.S. Princess Patricia and P.S. Queen Mary, were built at various shipyards on the upper and lower Clyde and, with the exception of P.S. Maid of the Loch which was dismantled and re-assembled because of its large size, were either sailed or hauled up the River Leven to enter the loch.

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Loch Lomond Steamer Prince of Wales in Loch Lomond Company Colours

The first steamer appeared on Loch Lomond in 1818 just a few years after Henry Bell’s pioneering steamship The Comet was launched in 1812. David Napier inspired by Bell’s Comet built the Marion, a 60 ft. wooden steamer, and plied the loch carrying tourists. Loch Lomond and The Trossachs were made popular by the works of Sir Walter Scott such as his novel Rob Roy and his narrative poem Lady of the Lake published in 1810. A few years later a group of businessmen established The Loch Lomond Steam Boat Company buying a rival steamer, The Lady of the Lake. Competition was fierce with a succession of companies being formed and new and bigger steamers capitalising on the newly emerging tourist trade. With the arrival of the railways in Balloch in July 1850, the steamers connected with the passenger trains making Loch Lomond accessible for many people.

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An early 20th century holiday snap with a note on back:
“Photo taken on a Loch Lomond steamer. On camp stool my dear wife, with Grace and Wilfred on either side.”

Cruising remained popular and The Loch Lomond Steam Boat Company was eventually taken over by the North British Steam Packet Company. Through a succession of acquisitions and nationalisation of the railways, the last steamer, Maid of the Loch, transferred to Caledonian MacBrayne and was withdrawn from service in 1981. Maid of the Loch, the last conventional paddle steamer to be built in Great Britain has been in the ownership of The Loch Lomond Steamship Company, a registered charity, since 1996 and is undergoing renovation with the aim of returning the Maid to steam operation in 2013.

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Maid of the Loch at Balloch pier

 

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