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Archive for the ‘Illustration’ Category

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A European brand name with over 150 years experience in beauty and skin care

The name Kaloderma is derived from the Greek words kalos ‘beautiful‘ and derma‘skin‘

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The Note

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Image found at MusicBabes

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A fair posterity

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a121287_unfortunate biker

Jove! Might have killed us! I must have a wire screen fixed up.

From Mr. Punch awheel, London, 190?

Image found in  OBI Scrapbook Blog

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Another mournful melancholy

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Image found on vintagraph.com

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Gil Elvgren (March 15, 1914 – February 29, 1980), born Gillette Elvgren in Saint Paul, Minnesota, was an American painter of pin-up girls, advertising and illustration. Elvgren was one of the most important pin-up and glamour artists of the twentieth century. Today he is best known for his pin-up paintings for Brown & Bigelow. Elvgren studied at the American Academy of Art.

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a12073_Lecomte du Nouÿ_01Jean-Jules-Antoine Lecomte du Nouÿ (Paris 10 June 1842 – 19 February 1923 Paris) was an Orientalist French painter and sculptor. He was strongly influenced by the works and teachings of Charles Gleyre and Jean-Léon Gérôme. Lecomte du Nouÿ found inspiration for his art through extensive travels to Greece, Turkey, Egypt and Italy. The thematic content of Lecomte du Nouÿ’s work was mainly figural, but also spanned over a vast range of imagery throughout his career, including classical, historical and religious.

Lecomte du Nouÿ is known for remaining faithful to his detailed, realistic style throughout the extent of his career, despite the onset of the Impressionist, Fauvist and Constructivist artistic movements during his lifetime. His work is said to have contributed significantly to the establishment of an iconic repertoire representing the Orient in the nineteenth century. A Parisian street was named after him in 1932.

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Maturity and Travels

In 1865, Jean-Jules-Antoine accompanied fellow artist, Félix-Auguste Clément (fr), on his travels to Cairo, Egypt. It was after this voyage that the young Lecompte du Nouy sought to portray the opulence of the Orient. In later years, Jean continued his travels, visiting countries like Italy and Greece. Lecompte du Nouy found inspiration in all social, historical and literary facets of foreign culture.

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Artistic Style

The Orientalist style is largely characterized by its content, but also by its subdued realism and precision allotted towards depicting the human form. The latter is a prominent characteristic of the 19th century methods upheld by the Académie des Beaux-Arts. Jean-Jules-Antoine was a prominent figure within the sphere of academic art and thereby would adhere to a rule-based artistic style of well-developed skill and formal composition. The artistic composition of Lecomte du Nouy’s paintings was often complemented by the use of half-light, which added certain dramatic and melancholic qualities to his work. To this day some, like Professor Alan Braddock, consider Jean-Jules-Antoine to have been decidedly modern for his time, because his work directly and indirectly broached some of the key issues of his day, albeit from a decidedly conservative perspective: colonialism, international trade, gender, religion, and history.

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Text from Wikipedia

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An uncomplicated illness

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Dean Yeagle is an American animator and cartoonist, born in 1950 in the United States, known for his character ‘Mandy’, who has frequented the pages of Playboy Magazine.

a12066_Dean Yeagle_01As a young Disney fan, Yeagle set his sights on becoming an animator for Disney around the age of 10. During this time he often drew Disney characters, but later began to develop his own.

After graduating from high school, Yeagle went to art school, leaving after a year. He began his animation career in a small studio in Philadelphia with a summer job, giving him his first taste of the industry. He served four years in the Navy during the Vietnam era, and later worked for Jack Zander (who once animated Tom and Jerry cartoons for MGM) in Zander’s Animation Parlour, New York.

Seven years after starting at Zander’s Animation Parlour, Yeagle began freelancing, working for most of the New York animation studios before starting his own, Caged Beagle Productions, in 1986 with Nancy Beiman. Caged Beagle produces TV commercials, CD-ROMs, sub-contracts or consults on features and character design.

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Yeagle has worked as a designer, animator and director, and he was nominated by the National Cartoonist Society (NCS) for the 2003 Gag Award for his work in Playboy Magazine.

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Clients have included Blue Sky Studios, Brøderbund, Dannon, Grey Advertising, Hanna-Barbera, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, ImaginEngine, Kraft, Marvel Comics,Nestle, Playboy Enterprises, Procter & Gamble, Random House, Saatchi & Saatchi, Walt Disney Productions, Warner Bros. and Western Publishing.

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Text from Wikipedia

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An Unnecessary Question

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Alexander Rothaug (* 13 March 1870 in Vienna ; † 5 March 1946 ibid; Complete name: Alexander Theodor Rothaug) was an Austrian painter and illustrator.

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Life

Rothaug Alexander was born in 1870 as the son of Theodor Rothaug and Karoline Rothaug (born bird). The maternal ancestors were also painters and sculptors. With the older brother Leopold Rothaug Alexander received his first painting lessons from his father Theodore.

In 1884 he began an apprenticeship as a sculptor at Johann Schindler (1822-1893), however, changed in 1885 at the Vienna Academy of Arts to assist in August Eisenmenger , Christian Griepenkerl and Franz Rumpler to study painting. Important influence as a teacher was also the Orient painter Leopold Carl Müller , in which Alexander Rothaug studied until his death in 1892.

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In 1892 he moved to Munich, where he as an illustrator for the humorous magazine Fliegende Blätter worked. In 1896 he married Ottilie Lauterkorn. He undertook study trips to Dalmatia , Italy and complaints . In May 1910 he became a member of the Association of Visual Artists Vienna. 1911 appears in the magazine Art Review,an extensive article about Alexander Rothaug.  In 1912 he holds at the invitation of the Archduke Ludwig Salvator on Mallorca on. Rothaug published on this stay the publication "Sketches from Miramar".

1933 Alexander Rothaug published under the title "statics and dynamics of the human body" in the form of a loose-leaf collection of 10 sheets a systematization of the human body in terms of a theory of proportion . He has also written a 38-page treatise entitled "The knowledge in painting" with the tripartite Appendix "thoughts about the art and the artist."

His honorary dedicated grave is located on the Grinzinger Cemetery (Group 15, number 1, number 2) in Vienna.

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Text from Wikipedia

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An unexpected benefit

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A nice change of scenery

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Ethel Hays (March 13, 1892 – March 19, 1989) was an American syndicated cartoonist specializing in flapper-themed comic strips in the 1920s and 1930s. She drew in Art Deco style. In the later part of her career, during the 1940s and 1950s, she became one of the country’s most accomplished children’s book illustrators.

Newspaper comics and illustrations

This experience with comic art changed the course of her career. Hays was subsequently offered work as a staff illustrator for the Cleveland Press, a job procured for her by the designer of the correspondence course himself, Charles N. Landon. Soon after, Landon would be touting Ethel Hays as among the "former students who are now successful comic strip artists" in his magazine ads of the 1920s.

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Hays’ first work at the Cleveland Press was for a trendy feature called Vic and Ethel, which consisted of flapper-themed satire and social commentary—including stories of "steeple-climbing and swimming in ice-filled lakes" and interviews with visiting celebrities — accompanied by Hays’s cartoons. Her first comic strip for Newspaper Enterprise Association was derived from that feature and was called simply Ethel. Here Hays continued to chronicle the era when women "bobbed their hair and took up active sports." Even at the beginning of her career, Hays’ style was "already polished and breathtakingly lovely."

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Hays also drew the noted one-panel cartoon series Flapper Fanny Says, also for NEA and starting in about 1924, with a Sunday page following in 1928.  In this panel, which featured a flapper illustration and a witticism, Hays "moved away from the fancy style of Nell Brinkley, drawing sleeker women with short hair—some even wearing pants." Her panel inspired competition for a time from Faith Burrows‘ similarly-themed Flapper Filosofy from the rival King Features Syndicate.

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Ethel Hays was married in 1925 to W.C. Simms of Kansas City, Missouri (she continued to use her maiden name in signing her art throughout her career). By 1928 she was a mother. After she had her second child, she found the daily workload becoming too heavy, and she turned Flapper Fanny Says over to promising newcomer Gladys Parker around 1931. Between 1931 and 1936, however, Hays did find time to illustrate at least 17 stories by noted and prolific author Ellis Parker Butler that were distributed to newspapers. Hays continued to produce a variety of other work for NEA, including full-page illustrations and montages for Every Week magazine, a Sunday newspaper supplement. Her final comic strip for NEA wasMarianne, beginning around February 1936, which ran weekly. Comic strip historian Allan Holtz wrote, "While the art was vintage Hays, the gags were strictly jokebook material. You could tell her heart was no longer in it." Her final installment ran on December 26, 1937, though the strip continued without her for another year or two.

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Text from Wikipedia

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…… told you to always wear clean knickers

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Yes, I Wonder

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image found on the Ego is a rat on the sinking ship of being.

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