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Archive for the ‘Jazz’ Category

The Ingenues was a vaudeville style all-girl jazz band based in Chicago, which toured the United States and other countries from 1925 to 1937. Managed by William Morris, the group performed frequently for variety theatre, vaudeville and picture houses, often billed as the opening stage show before double features. They headlined the Ziegfeld Follies of 1927, Glorifying the American Girl, an act featuring 12 white baby grands as well as various combinations of brass bands, strings and woodwinds. The group specialized in jazz, Tin Pan Alley, light classical works and Dixieland. They were celebrated for their versatility as most members, including star soloist and "trick trombonist" Paula Jones, doubled on both novelty (accordions, banjos) and symphonic instruments. The group toured Europe, South Africa, Asia, Australia and Brazil (where they also recorded for Columbia Records). The band appeared in several film shorts including The Band Beautiful and Syncopating Sweeties (Vitaphone 1928) and Maids and Music (RKO, 1937). "Maids and Music" was produced independently by Milton Schwarzwald’s Nu-Atlas Productions and released as a 16mm home movie by Pictoreels. Sequences from this and other Schwarzwald short subjects were also re-edited into Soundies; in the case of "Maids and Music" the Soundies excerpt was titled "Ray Fabing’s Versatile Ingenues."

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536_Julie Driscol_01Julie Tippetts (born Julie Driscoll, 8 June 1947, London, England) is an English singer and actress, known for her 1960s versions of Bob Dylan‘s "This Wheel’s on Fire", and Donovan‘s "Season of the Witch", both with Brian Auger & The Trinity. Along with The Trinity, she was featured prominently in the 1969 television special 33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee, singing "I’m a Believer" in a soul style with Micky Dolenz. She and Auger had previously worked in Steampacket, with Long John Baldry and Rod Stewart.

"This Wheel’s on Fire" reached number five in the United Kingdom in June 1968. With distortion, the imagery of the title and the group’s dress and performance, this version came to represent the psychedelic era in British music. Driscoll recorded the song again in the early ’90s with Adrian Edmondson as the theme to the BBC comedy series Absolutely Fabulous, whose main characters are throwbacks to that era.

Since the 1970s, Driscoll has concentrated on experimental vocal music, married jazz musician Keith Tippett and collaborated with him. Her name is now ‘Julie Tippetts’, thus using the original spelling of her husband’s surname. She participated in Keith Tippett’s big band 536_Julie Driscol_03Centipede and, in 1974, took part in Robert Wyatt‘s Theatre Royal Drury Lane concert; released a solo album, Sunset Glow in 1975; and was lead vocalist on Carla Bley‘s album Tropic Appetites and in John Wolf Brennan‘s "HeXtet".

Later in the 1970s, she toured with her own band, and recorded and performed as one of the vocal quartet ‘Voice’, with Maggie Nichols, Phil Minton and Brian Eley.

In the early 1980s, Julie Tippetts was a guest vocalist on an early single by pop-jazz band Working Week, on the song "Storm of Light", which brought them the attention of a wider audience. Though the band later continued with other vocalists – notably with Tracey Thorn of Everything but the Girl fame and the band’s long term staple, another Julie, last name Roberts – it was this single that marked the band’s arrival and a brief infatuation from the British and European public with stylish pop incorporating a strong jazz flavor, thus marking Julie Tippetts, née Driscoll, as a vocalist for every age.

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Wheels On Fire
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open 
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues 
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Road To Cairo
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues
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Season Of The Witch 
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues

I apologise for the sound quality on this record, but I’ve had it since 1967 – Ted 😉

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Ethel Waters (October 31, 1896 – September 1, 1977) was an African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. She frequently performed jazz, big band, and pop music, on the Broadway stage and in concerts, although she began her career in the 1920s singing blues.

Her best-known recordings include "Dinah," "Stormy Weather," "Taking a Chance on Love," "Heat Wave," "Supper Time," "Am I Blue?" and "Cabin in the Sky," as well as her version of the spiritual "His Eye Is on the Sparrow." Waters was the second African American, after Hattie McDaniel, to be nominated for an Academy Award. She is also the first African American woman to be nominated for an Emmy Award, in 1962.

510_Ethel Waters_03Career
After her start in Baltimore, Waters toured on the black vaudeville circuit. As she described it later, "I used to work from nine until unconscious." Despite her early success, she fell on hard times and joined a carnival, traveling in freight cars along the carnival circuit and eventually reaching Chicago. Waters enjoyed her time with the carnival and recalled, "the roustabouts and the concessionaires were the kind of people I’d grown up with, rough, tough, full of larceny towards strangers, but sentimental and loyal to their friends and co-workers." She did not last long with them, though, and soon headed south to Atlanta, where she worked in the same club with Bessie Smith. Smith demanded that Waters not compete in singing blues opposite her. Waters conceded and sang ballads and popular songs. Around 1919, Waters moved to Harlem and there became a celebrity performer in the Harlem Renaissance during the 1920s.

Waters obtained her first Harlem job at Edmond’s Cellar, a club that had a black patronage. She specialized in popular ballads and became an actress in a blackface comedy called Hello 1919. Jazz historian Rosetta Reitz points out that by the time Waters returned to Harlem in 1921, women blues singers were among the most powerful entertainers in the country. In 1921, Waters became the fifth black woman to make a record, on the tiny Cardinal Records label. She later joined Black Swan Records, where Fletcher Henderson was her accompanist. Waters later commented that Henderson tended to perform in a more classical style than she would prefer, often lacking "the damn-it-to-hell bass."

She recorded with Black Swan from 1921 through 1923. In early 1924, Paramount bought the Black Swan label, and she stayed with Paramount through that year. Waters first recorded for Columbia Records in 1925, achieving a hit with her voicing of "Dinah", which was voted a Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 1998. Soon after, she started working with Pearl Wright, and together they toured in the South. In 1924, Waters played at the Plantation Club on Broadway. She also toured with the Black Swan Dance Masters. With Earl Dancer, she joined what was called the "white time" Keith Vaudeville Circuit, a traditional white-audience based vaudeville circuit 510_Ethel Waters_04combined with screenings of silent movies. They received rave reviews in Chicago and earned the unheard of salary of US$1,250 in 1928. In 1929, Waters and Pearl Wright arranged the unreleased Harry Akst song "Am I Blue?," which then appeared in the movie On with the Show and became a hit and her signature tune.

Although she was considered a blues singer during the pre-1925 period, Waters belonged to the vaudeville style of Mamie Smith, Viola McCoy, and Lucille Hegamin. While with Columbia, she introduced many popular standards including "Dinah," "Heebie Jeebies," "Sweet Georgia Brown," "Someday, Sweetheart," "Am I Blue?" and "(What Did I Do To Be So) Black and Blue" on the popular series, while she continued to sing blues (like "West End Blues," "Organ Grinder Blues," etc.) on Columbia’s 14000 race series. During the 1920s, Waters performed and was recorded with the ensembles of Will Marion Cook and Lovie Austin. As her career continued, she evolved toward being a blues and Broadway singer, performing with artists such as Duke Ellington. She remained with Columbia through 1931. She then signed with Brunswick in 1932 and remained until 1933 when she went back to Columbia. She signed with Decca in late 1934 for only two sessions, as well as a single session in early 1938. She recorded for the specialty label "Liberty Music Shops" in 1935 and again in 1940. Between 1938 and 1939, she recorded for Bluebird.

In 1933, Waters made a satirical all-black film entitled Rufus Jones for President, which featured then-child performer Sammy Davis Jr. as Rufus Jones. She went on to star at the Cotton Club, where, according to her autobiography, she "sang ‘Stormy Weather’ from the depths of the private hell in which I was being crushed and suffocated." She had a featured role in the wildly successful Irving Berlin Broadway musical revue As Thousands Cheer in 1933, where she was the first black woman in an otherwise white show. She had three gigs at this point; in addition to the show, she starred in a national radio program and continued to work in nightclubs. She was the highest paid performer on Broadway at that time. MGM hired Lena Horne as the ingenue in the all-Black musical Cabin in the Sky, and Waters starred as Petunia in 1942, reprising her stage role of 1940. The film, directed by Vincente Minnelli, was a success.

She began to work with Fletcher Henderson again in the late 1940s. She was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award in 1949 for the film Pinky, under the direction of Elia Kazan, after original director, John Ford, quit, due to his disagreements with Waters. According to producer Daryl Zanuck, Ford "hated that old…woman (Waters)." Ford, Karzan stated, "Didn’t know how to reach Ethel Waters." Kazan later referred to Water’s "Truly odd combination of old-time religiosity and free-flowing hatred.". In 1950, she won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for her performance opposite Julie Harris in the play The Member of the Wedding. Waters and Harris repeated their roles in the 1952 film version of Member of the Wedding” In 1950, Waters starred in the television series Beulah, but quit after complaining that the scripts’ portrayal of blacks was "degrading." She later guest starred in 1957 and 1959 on NBC’s The Ford Show, Starring Tennessee Ernie Ford. In the 1957 episode, she sang "Cabin in the Sky."

510_Ethel Waters_01

Despite these successes, her brilliant career was fading. She lost tens of thousands in jewelry and cash in a robbery, and had difficulties with the IRS. Her health suffered, and she worked only sporadically in following years. In 1950-51 she wrote the autobiography His Eye is on the Sparrow with Charles Samuels, in which she wrote candidly about her life. She explains why her age has often been misstated: her mother had had to sign a paper claiming Waters was four years older than she was, and that she was born in 1896. His Eye is on the Sparrow was adapted for a stage production in which she was portrayed by Ernestine Jackson. In her second autobiography, To Me, It’s Wonderful, Waters states that she was born in 1900. Rosetta Reitz called Waters "a natural … [Her] songs are enriching, nourishing. You will want to play them over and over again, idling in their warmth and swing. Though many of them are more than 50 years old, the music and the feeling are still there."

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Harlem on my mind
Ethel Waters 
The Chronological Ethel Waters 1933 -1938
1933
1999
blues/Jazz
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Trade Mark
Ethel Waters
The Chronological Ethel Waters 1933 -1938
1938
1999
blues/Jazz
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Jeepers Creepers
Ethel Waters
 
The Chronological Ethel Waters 1933 -1938
1938
1999
blues/Jazz
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St Louis Blues
Ethel Waters
 
The Chronological Ethel Waters 1946-1947
1947
1999
blues/Jazz

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486_mickey_championBorn in Lake Charles, LA, powerhouse blues singer Mickey Champion has worked with the likes of T-Bone Walker, Little Esther Phillips, Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Ray Charles, Jackie Wilson, and many others in her long but unfortunately largely unsung five-decade career. Discovered in L.A. (where she continues to make her home in the Crenshaw District) by bandleader and ever-vigilant talent scout Johnny Otis, Champion recorded several impressive R&B sides in the 1950s and early ’60s, none of which established her as a household name. The wife of bandleader Roy Milton until his death, Champion began recording again in 2000, releasing I Am Your Living Legend! that year, followed by What You Want in 2003, both on Tondef Records. She was the subject of a video documentary produced by Paul Vic and Oletha Rogers called Champion Blues, and in 2008 Ace U.K. issued her collected singles from the 1950s and 1960s under the title Bam a Lam: The R&B Recordings 1950-1962

These three recordings are from that Collection – Ted:

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I’m A Woman 
Mickey Champion 
Bam a Lam:The R&B Recordings 1950 – 1962
July 15, 2008
Jazz Blues / Jump Blues

http://color=#333333I’m%20A%20Woman
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I’ve Got It Bad
Mickey Champion 
Bam a Lam:The R&B Recordings 1950 – 1962
July 15, 2008
Jazz Blues / Jump Blues

http://color=#333333I’ve%20Got%20It%20Bad
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I’m Telling You
Mickey Champion 
Bam a Lam:The R&B Recordings 1950 – 1962
July 15, 2008
Jazz Blues / Jump Blues

http://color=#333333I’m%20Telling%20You

Text from allmusic.com

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255_jazz

Is it just me, or is it something that doesn’t sit quite right with the title of that photo – Ted

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Ottilie Patterson (31 January 1932 – 20 June 2011) was a Northern Irish blues singer best known for her performances and recordings with the Chris Barber Jazz Band in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

PD*45461575

Biography
Anna Ottilie Patterson was born in Comber, County Down, Northern Ireland, on 31 January 1932. She was the youngest child of four. Her father, Joseph Patterson, was from Northern Ireland, and her mother, Jūlija Jēgers, was from Latvia. They met in southern Russia. Ottilie’s name is an Anglicised form of the Latvian name "Ottilja". Both sides of the family were musical, and Ottilie trained as a classical pianist from the age of eleven, but never received any formal training as a singer.

239-Ottilie Patterson_002In 1949 Ottilie went to study art at Belfast College of Technology, where a fellow student introduced her to the music of Bessie Smith, Jelly Roll Morton, and Meade Lux Lewis.  In 1951, she began singing with Jimmy Compton’s Jazz Band, and in August 1952 she formed the Muskrat Ramblers with Al Watt and Derek Martin.

In the summer of 1954, while holidaying in London, Ottilie met Beryl Bryden, who introduced her to the Chris Barber Jazz Band.

She joined the Barber band full-time on 28 December 1954, and her first public appearance was at the Royal Festival Hall on January 9, 1955. Between 1955 and 1962 Ottilie toured extensively with the Chris Barber Jazz Band and issued many recordings: those featuring her on every track include the EPs Blues (1955), That Patterson Girl (1955), That Patterson Girl Volume 2 (1956), Ottilie (1959), and the LP Chris Barber’s Blues Book (1961); she also appeared on numerous Chris Barber records.

She and Barber were married in 1959. They divorced in 1983.

239-Ottilie Patterson_003From 1963 or so, she began to suffer throat problems and ceased to appear and record regularly with Chris Barber, officially retiring from the band in 1973. During this period she recorded some non-jazz/blues material such as settings of Shakespeare (with Chris Barber) and in 1969 issued a solo LP 3000 years with Ottilie which is now much sought by collectors.

In early 1983, Ottilie and Chris Barber gave a series of concerts around London, which were recorded for the LP Madame Blues and Doctor Jazz (1984). This is her most recently issued recording.

Ottilie is buried in Movilla Abbey Cemetery, Newtonards, Northern Ireland in the Patterson family grave. Her gravestone, marked Ottilia Anna Barber, is by the wall adjacent to the car park.

In Feb 2012 a plaque marking her birthplace in a terraced house in Comber was unveiled and the same evening a sell-out musical Tribute was performed at the La Mon Hotel, Comber.

Solo LPs
Ottilie’s Irish Night
(Pye NPL 18028) (1959)
3000 years with Ottilie
(Marmalade 608 011) (1969)
Spring Song
(Polydor 2384 031) (1969)
Back In The Old Days
(Timeless CBJBLP 4001) (1988)
(recorded 1959-1962)

264_otillie patterson
The next 7 days you’ll find all
tracks from this LP in the box
widget in the right column

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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intro_ill_rsrg_thumb5_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings. This glossary may help you find your way in this label jungle. As you can see from the text above here this glossary is from 1979 and as this is a retro blog that works alright for me. Besides, any music styles that has emerged since then is of little interest to me, with the possible exception of neo-classic country. I’m sorry to say that dance, trance, hip-hop, rap and the rest simply don’t do it for me – Ted


You’ll find Glossary A – B here

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