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cover_nyBack in 2013 I posted a series of posts based on the 1930 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s “ Illustrated Guide Book to London”. For those who have followed this blog for a while it should come as no surprise that I also have in my possession the 1910 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s illustrated guide book for the same city. And just for the record, I have the 1948 and 1956 editions too.

This will be the first post based on the 1910 edition which is surprisingly enough more richly illustrated than the one from 1930. And we start of course with the introduction and work our way through the most interesting parts of the book – Ted

Cabs & Fares

CABS These vehicles, for which there are stands in or adjoining all the principal thoroughfares, are of three kinds taximeter motor cabs, hansoms, & four-wheelers, Some of the two latter classes of vehicle are now also provided with taximeters.

The Motor Taximeters, introduced in 1907, are fast ousting the older forms of conveyance. The taximeter is a small piece of machinery, generally set to the left of the driver, which automatically records the fare by a combination of time and distance as the journey proceeds. When “ in repose " a small flag of red metal is displayed bearing the words for hire.

Directly the cab is engaged, the driver turns down the flag and the machinery by means of which the fare is calculated is set in motion. Four passengers can generally be accommodated. The vehicles are roomy, smartly painted, well upholstered, and silent running, and can be used either open or closed, according to the weather.

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Their one drawback is that they usually only convey a small quantity of luggage. The drivers, who are all stylishly uniformed and present none of the picturesque but not always agreeable oddities of the old-style cabman, are generally paid by a commission on their earnings, and have to pay for their own petrol and to provide  “rank money” and other expenses. 

Needless to say, they have no insuperable objection to accepting a few coins of the realm over and above the amount demanded by the dial. The following is the ofiicial scale of charges for taximeter motor-cabs, whether hired or discharged within or without the four-mile radius from Charing Cross:

Two children under ten count as one person.

Not exceeding one mile, or for time
not exceeding ten minutes:
0s. 8d.
Exceeding one mile or ten mimutes
(1) For each quarter of a mile, or time
not exceeding two and a half minutes
0s. 2d.
(2) For any less distance or time:
Each additional person beyond two,
the whole journey
0s. 6d.
Packages carried outside
0s. 2d.
Bicycles, etc.
0s. 6d.

In addition to their use in town, motor “taxies" are often hired for country and seaside trips. It is optional for other public vehicles to adopt the taximeter system; these also are usually distinguished by a small flag. The following is the official scale for Horse-drawn Taximeter cabs:

Not exceeding one mile, or for time not exceeding 12 minutes 
0s. 6d.
Exceeding one mile or 12 minutes; for each half-mile, or
time not exceeding six minutes; or any less distance or time
0s. 3d.

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Handsoms in Regent Street

Hansoms, named after their 1nventor, are two-wheeled vehicles with a perch for the driver behind. They have seats for two only, but are frequently used by three. The “fare” communicates with the driver by means of a trap-door in the roof.The Four-wheelers, or “Growlers" seat four inside with more or less discomfort, and accommodate an outside passenger on the box. They are generally employed when the traveller is encumbered with heavy luggage.

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Four-wheelers aka Growlers at Westminister

To summon a taximeter, a cab-whistle is blown once; for a hansom twice; for a four-Wheeler three times. Fares for non-taximeter cabs are usually computed by distance; but they may be calculated by time instead, if the hirer expresses his wish for such an arrangement when taking the cab.

Fares By Distance
If hired and discharged within the 4-mile radius from Charing Cross,
1s. for two miles or under; 6d. for each additional mile, for not more than two persons; each additional person 6d. extra for the entire journey. Two children under ten count as one adult.

If hired outside the radius, wherever discharged,
1s. for the first mile; 1s. each succeeding mile or part of a mile.

If hired within but discharged without the radius,
1s. for the first mile, 6d. for each mile ended within circle, 1s. for each mile ended without circle, 1s. for any part of a mile over.

Cabs kept waiting,
8d. for each completed quarter of an hour. Drivers of horse-drawn cabs not fitted with a taximeter may, if they so desire, intimate to the “fare,” their willingness to accept sixpence for any journey not exceeding a mile.

Fares By Time
Within the radius,
four-wheelers, 2s.; hansoms, 2s. 6d. for the first hour; 6d. and 8d. for each additional quarter hour.

If hired outside the radius wherever discharged, or if hired within but discharged without,
four-wheelers and hansoms, 2s. 6d. for the first hour or less; 8d. for each additional quarter hour.

Luggage carried outside the cab, 2d. per package, bicycles, etc., 6d.

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a121302_no eggs alright

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Visitors to Hampstead Heath in north London could have been forgiven for thinking they had somehow taken a wrong turn and ended up in Norway this afternoon. The unexpected sight of a nearly full-size ski jump, complete with real snow and skiers, on a sunny March day in southern England, was enough to make the most broad-minded of observers do a double-take.

The snow, and most of the skiers, were indeed from Norway, but the ski jump was the creation of the Central Council of Physical Recreation, alongside the Ski Club of Great Britain and the Oslo Ski Association.

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The team of 25 Norwegian skiers brought the snow with them – 45 tons of it, packed in wooden boxes insulated by dry ice.The jump itself was supported by a tower of scaffolding 60ft (18.29m) high, giving skiers a 100ft (30.48m) run-up to the jumping point, 12ft (3.66m) above the ground.

We are very much hoping it will become one of the country’s major sporting features

Event official

Modern ski jumps reach 200ft – 300ft (60m – 90m), but skiers on Hampstead Heath only had enough room to jump to about 90ft (27.43m).

The London ski jumping competition, as it is known, held a trial contest yesterday evening involving only the Norwegian skiers. The event the crowd was waiting for, however, was this afternoon’s contest between Oxford and Cambridge University. Tens of thousands of people gathered in the sunshine to watch the University Challenge Cup.

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It was the first time ski jumping had been seen by most of the crowd. A broadcast commentary on the competition kept everyone informed of the quality of each jump. Spectators, however, seemed to be more interested in how deep each skier disappeared into the straw laid at the bottom of the run.

In the end, the Oxford team, captained by C. Huitfeldt, won the competition, while the London challenge cup – open to all competitors – was won by Arne Hoel of Oslo. An official said of the event, "This exhibition has been such an unqualified success that we are very much hoping it will become one of the country’s major sporting features."

In Context

The ski-jump competition was never held again, despite several attempts to revive it.

The ski-jump on Hampstead Heath was among the last major events to use real snow to re-create ski conditions.

The first artificial snow was made two years later, in 1952, at Grossinger’s resort in New York, USA.

Text from BBC’s OnThisDay

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cover_nyere_flatBack in 2013 I posted a series of posts based on the 1930 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s “ Illustrated Guide Book to London”. For those who have followed this blog for a while it should come as no surprise that I also have in my possession the 1910 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s illustrated guide book for the same city. And just for the record, I have the 1948 and 1956 editions too.

This will be the first post based on the 1910 edition which is surprisingly enough more richly illustrated than the one from 1930. And we start of course with the introduction and work our way through the most interesting parts of the book – Ted

Preliminary Information – A-B

ExplanatoryIn this section, arranged alphabetically, information is given respecting a number of matters of interest and importance both to visitors and residents.

Accidents

The number of accidents in streets within the Metropolitan police district has of late years, owing to the development of more rapid modes of locomotion, increased to an alarming extent, and the matter is receiving the earnest attention of the authorities.

It is not that the taxi-cabs and motor omnibuses are themselves so dangerous, as the fact that the varying speeds of the different classes of vehicles makes it difficult for the pedestrian to judge the rate at which he should cross the road.

The best advice is, Keep a sharp look-out, especially where there are converging thoroughfares or turnings at right angles. At some of the most crowded crossings, as at the Bank and the northern end of Blackfriars Bridge, subways have been constructed for pedestrians; and at all important centres constables are stationed to regulate the traffic.

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Horse drawn Omnibuses

If making your own way, use a mid-street refuge wherever available. Be especially careful if the roads are greasy. Above all, do not get flurried. The rule is for vehicles to keep to the left, pedestrians to the right. In all the principal thoroughfares are ambulance stations, or ambulance “ calls,” and the police are trained to render first aid.

In entering trams and Omni-busses, especially motor-buses, hold firmly to the rail till you are either inside or safely on top. This is quite as important if the vehicle is stationary as if moving, for the jerk caused by a sudden start may send you headlong. In alighting, follow the same rule, and if you must jump off while the vehicle is in motion – it is against the rules,- but most people do it–jump in a forward direction. It is as well, too, to make quite sure that nothing coming from behind will obstruct your passage to the pavement.

Americans In London

Speaking at a dinner in London, the Hon. J. H. Choate, then American Ambassador, made the following suggestions:

“An American lately arrived in London should trace out in this great City those memorials and things of interest pertaining to America of which England and London are full. If he lands at Plymouth, his feet rest upon those mysterious figures at the dock, ‘1620’- the very place where, nearly 300 years ago, our pilgrim fathers embarked in the Mayflower to try their fortunes in the wilderness, and lay the foundations of the great nation which we now represent.

If by chance he lands at Gravesend, in the chancel of St. George’s Church he will drop a tear over the tomb of Pocahontas, the American Indian Princess,  whose father, Powhattan, was king in Virginia when the great Elizabeth still sat on the throne of England.

Coming up to London, if he will allow me to take him ‘ a personally-conducted tour,’ I will conduct him to St. Saviour’s Cathedral, in Southwark, where is recorded the baptism of John Harvard, who gave his name, his library and half his fortune for the foundation of that college in America which has become the leader of education for half a sphere.

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Old houses, Holborn

At the Charterhouse will be found associations of Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island, and the apostle of toleration. In the National Portrait Gallery is a representation of Sir Henry Vane the younger, Governor of Massachusetts in 1636, who, after the Restoration, lost his head as the penalty for devotion to the cause of the Commonwealth. But greater names and greater forms appear in that asylum of truly famous British men.

There were George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Benjamin West of Philadelphia, who took such an active part in the creation of the Royal Academy, and succeeded Sir Joshua Reynolds as president. In another part of the City will be found a statue of George Peabody, the philanthropist.

There are also the memorials of George Thompson, Phillips Brooks, Abraham Lincoln, James Russell Lowell, and, in Westminster Abbey, of Longfellow.”

To this we may add that at the Church of All Hallows, Barking, the entry of the baptism of Wm. Penn (October 23, 164.4), who was born on the adjacent Tower Hill, is still to be seen in the registers, and that John Quincy Adams was married in the same fane on July 26, 1797.

The registers of St. George’s, Hanover Square, contain the not less interesting record of the marriage of Theodore Roosevelt (December 2, 1886). In the church of St. Sepulchre, Newgate Street, is the tomb of the redoubtable Captain John Smith, sometime Governor of Virginia.

Bath And Bathing

Swimming and private baths, maintained by the local authorities, are to be found in nearly every quarter. The St. George`s Baths, 88, Buckingham Palace Road, the Westminster Baths, 22, Great Smith Street, and the Holborn Baths, B road Street, may be mentioned. An open-air swim can be had in the Serpentine, Hyde Park, before 8 a.m. and after 8 p.m.; at the Ponds on Hampstead Heath, and elsewhere.

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Of Turkish Baths, the best known are the Charing Cross (Nevill’s), Northumberland Avenue (3s. 6d.; after 7 p.m. 2s.) ; the Savoy, Savoy Street (2s.6d.; after 6 p.m. 1s.6d.);the Hammam, 76, Jermyn Street, W. (4s. ; after 7 p.m. 2s.) ; Bartholomew’s, 23, Leicester Square ; Broad Street, Broad Street House, E.C. (Nevill’s) ; and others. In nearly all the charge is reduced after 6 or 7 p.m.

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cover_nyere_flatBack in 2013 I posted a series of posts based on the 1930 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s “ Illustrated Guide Book to London”. For those who have followed this blog for a while it should come as no surprise that I also have in my possession the 1910 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s illustrated guide book for the same city. And just for the record, I have the 1948 and 1956 editions too.

This will be the first post based on the 1910 edition which is surprisingly enough more richly illustrated than the one from 1930. And we start of course with the introduction and work our way through the most interesting parts of the book – Ted

 

Hotels & Tariffs

Notwithstanding the enormous increase during the last few years in the number and capacity of London hotels, the resources of the metropolis are in summer severely taxed by the ever-increasing army of visitors from the Continent, the Colonies, and the provinces. London, long supreme in size and commercial importance, has within the last decade or so confounded her detractors by proving herself easily first as a pleasure resort also.

It may be doubted whether all the holiday places of the South Coast together have within the year so many visitors as the dull town whose own inhabitants are so eager to get away from her. The visitor who is Wise will-particularly in August and September-endeavour to make his arrangements for accommodation before arrival. An enquiry addressed to any of the establishments named in the following list will bring full particulars and save possible disappointment.

The tariffs have been obtained directly from the proprietors, but we can accept no responsibility for their accuracy. Prices are, moreover, liable to fluctuate according to season. Travellers who only wish to spend a night or two in London will perhaps find the Railway Hotels adjoining the various terminals convenient :–

 

Private and Temperance Hotels and Boarding Houses.

Private Hotels are those not licensed for the sale of Wine, spirits, or beer. Boarding Houses are principally to be found in the Bloomsbury quarter, but there are many others in the attractive outer suburbs, such as Hampstead, Bayswater, Dulwich, etc.

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Good “board and lodging” is offered by these establishments at from 3 5.9. to 55s. a week. For private apartments the average charge in Bloomsbury may be taken at about 21 s. a room per week, or in West End streets off Piccadilly double that figure. Advertisements of furnished apartments and lodging-houses will be found in the daily newspapers.

Restaurants

Recent years have witnessed a remarkable change in the habits of London society, and public restaurants are used for many luncheon, dinner and supper parties that would formerly have been given at home. The fastidious diner-out may glean some interesting and profitable information concerning London restaurants from Lieut.-Colonel Newnham-Davis’s “Dínners and Diners”.

The hard-set traveller who tries on arrival the restaurants of Messrs. J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., or Messrs. Spiers and Pond at the chief railway termini is not likely to have cause for complaint. The principal hotels generally either have restaurants attached or are glad to welcome non-residents at the table d’hôte.

The traveller will have no difficulty in finding for himself scores of  establishments, providing excellent fare. It may be said of many of the first class
restaurants that they are not so expensive as they look; and humble mortals who are content with a “grill" or other simple dishes, will pay no more than they would have to do elsewhere.

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The sightseer who happens to be in the suburbs at the hour of the midday or evening meal must generally consider himself fortunate if he comes across any eating-house other than a coffee-shop or a public-house. The numerous establishments of Slaters’ Ltd., J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., Lipton’s, Ltd., and other similar companies, supply a very fair luncheon or dinner for 1s. 64. to 2s. ; while fare of a lighter kind, including soups, cold meat, etc., can be had at the shops of the Aärated Bread Co., Ltd., J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., and others. Most of these now supply breakfasts also.

Visitors who are making the round of the Museums at South Kensington will find an excellent restaurant and grill-room at the Victoria and Albert Museum, near the entrance from Exhibition Road. There are also restaurants at the Natural History Museum, the British Museum, the Tate Gallery, and other showplaces.

Ladies shopping at any of the large drapery establishments, such as Marshall and Snelgrove’s, Selfridge’s, Swan and Edgar’s, Peter Robinson’s, Harrods’, Shoolbreds’, Gamage’s,or the Stores, will find excellent luncheon and tea-rooms on the premises.

The object of providing these conveniences being to attract and keep customers the fare is always of the best, and the prices are often below those charged outside.

The luncheons (1s. 6d.) and dinners (2s. 6d.) served at some of the foreign restaurants in the neighbourhood of Soho are astonishingly cheap. It is usual in all restaurants to tip the waiter or waitress about Id. per shilling in the bill (ad. per is. in the higher class places). In the establishments of the Aärated Bread Co., Ltd., J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., and some others “ no tips " is the golden rule.

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West-End Restaurants

Many restaurants, notably those under foreign management. are open on Sunday afternoon and evening, the usual hours being from 6 to 11 p.m., sometimes also from I to 3 p.m.

City Restaurants.

The City is noted for old-fashioned taverns, and others with old names but ‘new-fashioned’ styles. In some a speciality is made of particular dishes on certain days.

Among City men it is a common practice to adjourn after luncheon for “coffee and smoke," chess, dominoes, etc., to one of the subterranean establishments of Ye Mensa, Ltd., or their competitors.

Tea Rooms

The establishments, already referred to, of the Aärated Broad Co., Ltd., J. Lyons and Co., Ltd., Slaters, Ltd., the Cabins, Ltd., Lipton’s, Ltd., and others are to be found in all the principal West End and City thoroughfares, and seem to increase in number almost weekly.

Cup of tea or coffee, freshly made for each customer, 2d. and 3d. ; roll, or cut bread, and butter, 2d.; cake or pastries, 1d. and 2d. –

Of late many tea rooms of a higher grade, artistically decorated and with waitresses in fancy costume, have sprung up in the West End, notably in and around Bond Street. There are also the well-managed tea rooms connected with the large drapery establishments.

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Back in 2013 I posted a series of posts based on the 1930 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s “ Illustrated Guide Book to London”. For those who have followed this blog for a while it should come as no surprise that I also have in my possession the 1910 edition of Ward Lock & Co’s illustrated guide book for the same city. And just for the record, I have the 1948 and 1956 editions too.

This will be the first post based on the 1910 edition which is surprisingly enough more richly illustrated than the one from 1930. And we start of course with the introduction and work our way through the most interesting parts of the book – Ted 

Introduction

cover_ny_flat"That London. which is the pride and the problem of our race." -Lord Roseberry

No words could better serve as introduction to a Guide to London than those of Heine : “ I have seen the greatest wonder which the world can show to the astonished spirit. I have seen it, and am more astonished than ever–and still there remains in my memory that stone forest of houses, and amid them the rushing stream of faces, of living human faces, with all their motley passions, all their terrible impulses of love, of hunger, and of hate."

In this volume we can attempt only to direct the stranger’s footsteps through the “stone forest of houses"  "the  rushing stream of faces ”–with which no building can compare in interest–he must study for himself. Certainly in no city of ancient or modern days has there been such “fullness of life” as that which crowds the streets of the Metropolis at this period of our history, and if Dr. Johnson were alive to-day we can well believe that he would enjoy the traditional “walk down Fleet Street" With even more than his accustomed relish.

The Sightseer’s London

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Although the Metropolis is so vast that it would take the best part of a lifetime to traverse its 10,000 streets, and another lifetime to know intimately every part of the suburbs, the features of interest appealing especially to sightseers are, with few exceptions, confined to a central area, for the most part north of the Thames, measuring roughly some five miles from west to east, and three from north to south. We are far indeed from saying that there is not anything of interest outside this area, but we do say that the visitor, however hardy and determined, who has methodically and conscientiously “done” the orthodox sights, and taken a trip or two by way of relaxation to places like Windsor and Hampton Court, will have little heart or shoe-leather left for Islington and Kilburn, and other places in the “Middle Ring" unless the calls of business or of friendship lure him thither. We have accordingly dealt fully with the West End and the City, and outlined all the principal excursions; but the reader who is in search of detailed information respecting London’s suburban dormitories and nurseries must, we fear, be referred to volumes of greater capacity. We have done our best to squeeze a quart-  ought we not rather to say a hogshead? -into a pint pot, but something has perforce been spilt in the process.

London at a Glance

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It will greatly assist the stranger to keep his bearings in the crowded streets of Central London if he forms at the outset a mental picture of the direction and intersections of the principal thoroughfares. To this end we have prepared a special sketch map showing “ London at a Glance,“ believing that this will be more helpful than pages of elaborate directions. Bear in mind that the river runs from west to east, with a syphon-like northward bend from Vauxhall Bridge to Waterloo; and that the two chief thoroughfares, Oxford Street with its continuations, and the Strand with its continuations, follow approximately the same course from west to east, eventually meeting at the Bank of England. Connection north and south between these two great thoroughfares is provided by Regent Street in the west; by Kingsway and Aldwych, between Holborn and the Strand; and by Chancery Lane at the City boundary.

 

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“From the top of a ‘Bus, Gentlemen"

“The way to see London", said Mr. W. E. Gladstone once to some American tourists, “ is from the top of a bus- the top of a ‘bus, gentlemen." A shilling or two judiciously invested in penny and two penny fares will enable all the main thorough-fares to be traversed, and a much wider range of view will be secured than would be possible from a cab or carriage. The destinations of the various lines of omnibuses are clearly shown on the front and rear, and the chief places passed en route on the panels. Care should be taken to ascertain whether the omnibus is going to or from the point the visitor is desirous of reaching.

 

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