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Archive for the ‘Paintings’ Category

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Amelia Earhart painted by Howard Chandler Christy in 1933

Image found on one of James Vaughans Flickr albums

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François Martin-Kavel (Paris 1861 – 1931) French School. Painter of figures, nudes, landscapes, still lives and flowers. He was a regular exhibitor at the Salon des Artistes Français, of which he was a Member and was awarded a medal for his work in 1881.

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Curators have been studying Picasso’s "The Blue Room"—one of the highlights of the artist’s early 20th-century "blue period" —since 2008, and they’ve discovered it was painted over another work: a portrait of an unidentified man.

"The Blue Room" depicts a woman posing in Picasso’s Paris studio, but underneath is a study of a mustachioed man in a bowtie. Researchers at Washington D.C.’s Phillips Collection revealed the hidden image with a combination of X-ray and infrared analysis.

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"It’s really one of those moments that really makes what you do special," Phillips conservator Patricia Favero told the AP. "The second reaction was, ‘Well, who is it?’ We’re still working on answering that question."

Picasso reused many canvases early in his career, when he didn’t always have the means to afford fresh ones. His paintings "La Vie" and "Woman Ironing" were both previously discovered to have been painted over other pieces.

Text: NPR, Photos: AP Images

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Great-grandson of Duncan Phyfe, the iconic furniture designer of the early republic, Herold Rodney Eaton "Hal" Phyfe was born in Nice, France, to a New York society family. Trained as a sculptor in France and a painter in Italy, Hal Phyfe began pursuing photography an an enlistee in World War I documenting an aviation unit of the U.S. Army in Europe. He made a specialty of aerial photography. After the war he supported himself as an illustrator supplying magazines with covers rendered in pastels. He opened his photography studio in 1926.

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During the 1920s he built a reputation for his theatrical portraiture (sketches and photographs) shot on commission for various magazines. He became the principal photographer for Florenz Ziegfeld during 1930-31. He became famous for his dictum that no smiles were allowed during sittings. During the late 1920s he owned a dog who became something of a Broadway celebrity. Legend holds that he turned down a remunerative long-term contract with a magazine in the wake of his dog’s death, which disabled him from talking business. During the early 1930s he habitually wore a black tie in mourning. His melancholy was somewhat tempered when bootlegger Owney Madden entrusted his red tabby cat to Phyfe’s keeping when he was put away in Sing Sing. Phyfe’s notorious eccentricity of dress extended to wearing moccasins instead of shoes and dressing down in denim at debutante balls during that period when he was official photographer to High Society.

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He was one of the best amateur cooks in Manhattan, with recipes appearing in papers as far away as Los Angeles. In 1931 he was hired on a three month contract by Fox. He went to Hollywood and was besieged for portrait sittings. He preferred the social life of New York, so he returned to New York and resumed a career as one of the central society and theater photographers in the city. A sociable man, he was invariably on the committees for the beaux arts balls in the 1930s, or serving as judge in various charity photo contests. In June 1950 he leased a penthouse in the Parke-Bernet Galleries at 980-990 Madison Avenue for his studio.

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Specialty

As adept at portraying men as women, Phyfe produced some of the most dynamic male portraits of the late 1920s. He preferred not to portray performers in costume. A master of middle grays, his exhibition and portfolio prints of the late 1920s display exquisitely refined shading. During the late 1920s he indulged in the penchant among New York portraitists to vignette heads. There would be strong graphic intervention at the perimeters of the image, suggesting a drawing. In the 1930s he opted for a straighter style of portraiture, full body, often with the subject seated. His Society portraits of the 1930s are well posed and understated, suggesting refinement rather than ostentation. His popularity among Hollywood performers derives from his disinclination to overstate elegance. He signed original prints in red crayon in distinctive squared letters. His Hollywood portraits are signed on the negative in white.

Text from Broadway Photographers

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Henri Lebasque (25 September 1865 – 7 August 1937) was a French post-impressionist painter. He was born at Champigné(Maine-et-Loire). His work is represented in French museums, notably Angers, Geneva (Petit Palais), Lille (Musée des Beaux-Arts), Nantes, and Paris (Musée d’Orsay). Lebasque died at Cannet, Alpes Maritimes in 1937.

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Education and artistic development

He started his education at the École régionale des beaux-arts d’Angers, and moved to Paris in 1886. There, Lebasque started studying under Léon Bonnat, and assisted Ferdinand Humbert with the decorative murals at the Panthéon. Around this time, Lebasque met Camille Pissarro andAuguste Renoir, who later would have a large impact on his work.

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Lebasque’s vision was coloured by his contact with younger painters, especially Édouard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard, founders of the The Nabis’ Group, who were the Intimists that first favoured the calm and quietude of domestic subject matter. From his first acquaintance with Georges Seurat and Paul Signac, Lebasque learnt the significance of a colour theory which stressed the use of complementary colours in shading.

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Career

Lebasque was a founding member of the Salon d’Automne in 1903 with his friend Henri Matisse. Two years later, a group of artists exhibited there including Georges Rouault, André Derain, Édouard Vuillard, and Matisse. Lebasque also became friends with artists such as Gustave Rouault, Raoul Dufy, Louis Valtat, and Henri Manguin, the last of whom introduced Lebasque to theSouth of France.

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His time in South of France would lead to a radical transformation in Lebasque’s paintings, changing his colour palette forever. Other travels included the Vendée, Normandy, and Brittany.

Lebasque had some commercial success during his lifetime. He worked on the decorations at the theatre of the Champs-Elyséesand of the Transatlantique sealiner.

Text from Wikipedia

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Mario Borgoni was one of the early Italian artists who successfully made the transition from fine art to commercial art.

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His ornate illustrations used dramatic lighting and strong framing to enhance romantic compositions. Borgoni designed numerous hotel luggage labels which are now considered some of the finest visual representations of the golden age of travel.

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In 1905, he began a long relationship with the printing company Richter & C. In Naples Italy and eventually became its artistic director. Throughout his long career, he produced hundreds of posters, brochures and promotional materials for ENIT, the official Italian tourism agency.

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Jesús Helguera (May 28, 1910 – December 5, 1971) was a Mexican painter. Among his most famous works are La Leyenda de los Volcanes, La Leyenda, Popocapetl & Ixtaccihuatl, Hidalgo, "Rompiendo las Cadenas", El Aguila y la Serpiente, and Juan Diego y la Virgen de Guadalupe.

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Early life
Jesús Enrique Emilio de la Helguera Espinoza was born to Spanish economist Alvaro Garcia Helguera and Maria Espinoza Escarzarga on May 28, 1910 in Chihuahua, Mexico. He lived his childhood in Mexico City and later moved to
Córdoba in the state of Veracruz. His family fled from the Mexican Revolution to Ciudad Real, Castilla la Nueva, Spain and thereafter moved to Madrid. Jesús first gained interest in the arts during primary school and would often be found wandering the halls of the Del Prado Museum. At the age of 14, he was admitted to the Escuela Superior de Bellas Artes and later studied at the Academia de San Fernando. Helguera later married Julia Gonzalez Llanos, a native of Madrid, who modeled for many of his later paintings and with whom he raised two children.

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Career
Jesús first worked as an illustrator at the Editorial Araluce working on books, magazines and comics with many of his published works done in gouache. He became a professor of visual arts at a Bilboa Art Institute at the age of 18 and worked for magazines such as Estampa. Helguera was forced to move back to the Mexican state of Veracruz due to the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War and following economic crisis. Upon his arrival, mural making was en vogue and he was hired by Cigarrera la Moderna, a tobacco company, to produce calendar artwork printed by Imprenta Galas de Mexico. Much of his work reflected his own fascination with
Aztec Mythology, Catholicism, and the diverse Mexican landscape. His paintings showed an idealized Mexico and it was his romantic approach that gave his paintings the heroic impact that eventually made him famous. In 1940, he created what is arguably the most famous amongst his paintings, La Leyenda de los Volcanes, which was inspired by the legend of Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl. It was later purchased by Ensenanza Objectiva, a producer of didactic images for schools. Many of his paintings would later be reproduced in a variety of different calendars and cigar boxes reaching households and businesses throughout Mexico.

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Text from Wikipedia

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