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Archive for the ‘Plans & drawings’ Category

A splendid plan published in Modern Mechanix in July 1931   958_chute

Build This Monorail Bathing Chute for Thrills

As a thrill producer, it will be hard to beat this monorail bathing chute. Erected on a hill sloping down to a beach, it will send you flying out into the water at a breathtaking speed. Construction is very simple.

BATHING weather prompts many novel means of sport in the water such as diving slides, swings, etc., but here is a regular “shoot the chute” in simplified form with which loads of sport can be obtained and all at a minimum cost.

In laying out plans for the chute try and find a spot of land with a long gradual dip towards the bathing beach or swimming hole. Several hundred feet will furnish the greatest amount of fun, but it should have a hundred-foot stretch at least.

The track can be constructed entirely of ordinary hemlock or spruce boards six inches wide and 7/8 inches thick. The accompanying sketches show just how to put it together. Use short lengths of board laid end to end, the joints meeting over posts sunk into the ground at the proper height to give the track a nice even bearing to the slider.

Plans and description in jpg HERE

Found at: blog.modernmechanix.com

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926_4HNot one plan for you to day my DIY friends, but 21. A whole book actually. Kansas 4H Woodworking Plans published  by Kansas State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service.

21 plans of various degree of difficulty for handy children and youth out there in the sticks.

The book in pdf format –> pdf_thumb

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876_bowBows are among the oldest weapons in the world, yet an amazing thing was only recently discovered about them. Through mathematical analysis, laboratory investigation, high-speed photography, and painstaking field tests, it was found that the famous English long bow, after which practically all target bows are patterned, does not have the most efficient shape. Its beautifully rounded limbs are a delight to the eye, but the best cross section for a bow is something much simpler—just a plain rectangle. This discovery led to the development of the modern American flat bow, one easily made variety of which is described here.

When the white man provided the American Indian with a cheap trade musket in place of his native bow and arrow, he saved himself a good deal of grief, for had the red man developed his weapon along a logical path he might have arrived at an approximation of the bow we now know as the "semi-Indian," "flat," or "American" bow. With such a bow he could have shot with accuracy at a hundred yards (about the extreme accurate range of the long rifle), and could have delivered arrows faster than any frontier scout could load his rifle.

Drawings and plans in pdf format –> pdf_thumb

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843_hokey

Who hasn’t played table hockey at one time or another? It’s great fun, and you may have noticed how simple the “rink” really is. So why go out and buy a ready-made when you can make one yourself! With its small number of parts and simple joints, this is a great project for those with beginner level skills. You’ll gain experience in making dados and rabbets with a table saw, laying out and making parts from a template and doing multicolour staining prior to assembly and finishing. So go ahead and build, shoot and score!

Plans and description in puff HERE

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