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Archive for the ‘Retro advertising’ Category

A recipe from an ad for Kraft Cheese Company published in 1940875_bunniesRecipe HERE

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The first time I saw this ad on the net I laughed so much I almost fell off my chair. Finally an ad playing fully on men’s insecurities and self-esteem. And so boldly texted I find it hard to believe it was easy to place in most magazines.

It can’t have been much fun driving round in an ‘89 911 Carrera 4 for a while after that ad hit the magazine pages, a lot of Porsche owners must have been the victim of rather nasty comments about their lack of size, particularly from men who themselves couldn’t afford a car like that.

By the way, I’m quite aware that the ad may be a fake made by some net prankster, but I love it anyway – Ted

In context

Two guys were sitting on a front porch when a blonde walked by. “Let me show you how stupid blondes are” one of them said to the other and he called the blonde over. When she reached them he said “I’ll give you $10 if you paint my porch white”. “Ok” the blonde answered. The man told her she’d find paint and brushes round the corner and the two men went in to have lunch. An hour later the blond came in and said “I’m finished, give me my $10”.

They went out to check her work and found the porch was still unpainted. “You’re not finished” the man said angrily. “Of course I am” the blond replied and continued “Besides it’s not a Porsche, it is a Ferrari”.

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Fanta – The Humble Beginnings Of  A Worldwide Phenomenon

456_fanta_03There have been all kinds of stories about Fanta’s creation in Nazi Germany during WWII. Some of what has been said is true— a great deal is fiction.

Prior to the breakout of the war, Germany was the location of The Coca-Cola Company’s greatest overseas success. Records for sales were set year after year. By 1939, there were 43 bottling plants and more than 600 local distributors.

The German branch of The Coca-Cola Company had been run by an American-born man by the name of Ray Powers. He was killed in a car accident in 1938 and was replaced by the German-born Max Keith. As the new CEO, Keith was entrusted with all the operations for The Coca-Cola Company in all the occupied countries.

During the war, Keith was able to maintain a degree of contact with the Atlanta-based headquarters of The Coca-Cola Company via Switzerland. But by 1941 he was no longer able to receive Coca-Cola syrup, and was therefore unable to continue to manufacture Coca-Cola.

456_fanta_01Keith’s solution to the ingredient shortage was to invent a new drink. It was made from what was available at the time, namely things left over from other food industries. There was whey, which was a byproduct of cheese production and apple fiber left over from cider presses. A variety of other fruit byproducts were added depending on what was available at the time. This led to the many variations in flavor that later became the different marketed flavors of Fanta. This new soft drink was sweetened with beet sugar. As CEO, Keith held a contest to name his new creation. He instructed his employees to let their “Fantasie”—German for “imaginations”—run wild. A salesman, Joe Knipp immediately blurted out “Fanta”!

456_fanta_06The new soft drink was not only successful enough to keep the bottling plants open and the people employed for the duration of the war, but enabled Fanta to become a soft drink favorite in Europe. In 1943 there were 3 million cases of Fanta sold in Germany and the occupied countries. Evidently, not all of that quantity was purchased to drink as a refreshing soft drink, but may have been used to flavor soups and stews, due to sugar rationing.

456_fanta_04Max Keith was not a Nazi, and never became one, as has been rumored. Although he suffered hardships as a result of his decision, he never gave into pressure to join the Nazi Party. With the success of Fanta, Keith was able to safeguard The Coca-Cola Company’s interests in Europe until after the war, when they were able to re-establish drink production almost immediately.

The Coca-Cola Company acquired the rights to Fanta in 1960. Today, Fanta is sold in the highest volume in Brazil, Germany, Spain, Japan, Italy and Argentina. Fanta was originally created in an orange flavor that now accounts for 70% of all Fanta sales.

 

Fanta is sold in 188 countries and is available in 70 flavors, although some flavors are only available in the country where they are manufactured. Fanta is the number one soft drink in Thailand, and a new flavor was just launched in Japan—Fanta Japanese Melon.

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Text from RetroPlanet


Help Needed
I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

List of Soft drinks and sodas posted already
Visitors soft drinks and sodas suggestions and comments

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“Muscles are the new thin” is the new slogan around Europe these days and young women hit the training centres every day and eat so healthy that it becomes unhealthy. back in the days when the Mad Men cooked up the ad above the ideals were quite different. Young women were supposed to have forms, both here and there actually.

The add is terrible, particularly the drawings numbered 1,2 and 3, but there is a grain of truth in it some how. Most men prefer woman with forms. But does that justify making thin women feel bad about themselves. look at how the artist has made the thin woman’s face ugly and how she looks when she has gained a bit of weight. And do you think this is accidental. Get off it, it’s an ad for something that makes you gain weight – Ted

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Palmolive squeezed every last drop of female insecurity, low self-esteem, bad self-image, scare of getting old and vanity out of their “schoolgirl complexion” slogan and ran it for years on end through the thirties.

Leave jewels to those less fortunate, my ass – Ted

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As you may have gathered already, I like to rummage round in jumble sales and street markets looking for cookbooks and recipe cut-outs and this one was also found this way. This one comes from an ad for French’s Mustard that someone cut out and saved sometimes back in the late fifties.

You’ll find the recipe HERE

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From “Victorian Inventions” by Leonard De Vries published by American Heritage Press in 1972

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An unusual vehicle has recently been observed in the streets of Paris: a complete, mobile printing-press! The rear wheels of the tricycle have rims to which solid rubber tyres have been secured with strong, elastic bands: on its outer circumference, each tyre carries embossed printing-types enabling all sorts of short advertisements to be composed. A tank behind the driver’s seat feeds the printing ink through a tube to rubber rollers in continuous contact with the rear wheels. Between these inking-rollers a rotating fan, driven from the wheels, blows a downward stream of air on to the street to free it from dust. In this way, the advertisement is printed on a clean background to make it legible for a prolonged period of time.


I’ve worked in the advertising business for years myself so I know there is nothing those people wouldn’t do to get the message home, so this contraption comes as no surprise to me – Ted

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