Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Rythm and blues’ Category

a1160_joe cocker

John Robert "Joe" Cocker OBE
(20 May 1944 – 22 December 2014)

Read Full Post »

995_mable john_01Mable John (born November 3, 1930) is an American blues vocalist and was the first female signed by Berry Gordy to Motown’s Tamla label.

Biography

John was born in Bastrop, Louisiana. At a very young age, she and her parents moved to north across the state-line into Arkansas where her father got a job in a paper mill near the community of Cullendale. There four brothers (including R&B singer Little Willie John) and two sisters were born. In 1941, after her father was able to secure a better job, the family moved to Detroit, where two additional brothers were born. The family lived in a new housing development at Six Mile and Dequindre Road. She attended Cleveland Intermediate School, and then Pershing High School, which is at Seven Mile and Ryan Road. After graduating from Pershing High School, she took a job as an insurance representative at Friendship Mutual Insurance Agency, a company run by Berry Gordy‘s mother, Bertha. Later, she left the company and spent two years at Lewis Business College. She subsequently ran 995_mable john_02into Mrs. Gordy again, who told Mable that her son Berry was writing songs and was looking for people to record them. Gordy began coaching her and would accompany John on piano at local engagements. This continued until 1959, when John performed at the Flame Show bar on John R Street at the last show that Billie Holiday did in Detroit, just weeks before Holiday’s death.

The same year, John began recording for Gordy. First she was signed to United Artists, but nothing was released there. Eventually, she became one of the first artists signed to Tamla, Gordy’s own label. In 1960, she released her first Tamla single, "Who Wouldn’t Love a Man Like That?," a romantic blues number, to no success. John followed with "No Love" in June of that year and then with "Actions Speak Louder Than Words" by year’s end. While Motown was beginning to have success with acts like The Miracles and The Marvelettes (and later The Supremes, who had sung background vocals for John) that appealed to teenagers and young adults, it failed to make an impact in the established blues market. As a result, Gordy soon thinned out his roster of early blues artists. While John continued to be used as a background singer, Gordy dissolved her contract in 1962.

After leaving Motown, John spent several years as a Raelette, backing many Ray Charles hits. In 1966 she attempted a solo career again, signing with Stax Records. Her first single with the label was "Your Good Thing Is About To End." The song peaked at #6 on the R&B chart, and even managed to cross over onto pop radio, peaking at #95 there. She released six more singles for the label, none of which captured her first single’s success. After leaving Stax Records in 1968, John rejoinedThe Raelettes for several years. She left secular music in 1973, and began managing Christian gospel acts, occasionally returning to the studio as a singer.

John received a Pioneer Award from the Rhythm and Blues Foundation in 1994. She appeared in John Sayles‘ 2007 movie Honeydripper.

Read Full Post »

I have always enjoyed song lyrics with double meanings and 40s and 50s doo-wop and rhythm ‘n blues are crammed full of lyrics like that. I guess most of the cuts on the records below has never seen radio air. Dangerous Doo-Wop came in 4 volumes but Risqué Rhythm was produced in just the one. I’ve got all these records and I never tire of listening to them – Ted

864_Dangerous Doo-WopOne of the most enjoyable of R&B vocal collections, this first volume of the Dangerous Doo Wop series not only offers a first-rate entrée into the music, but should intrigue collectors as well. The familiar sounds of the Chords‘ "Sh-Boom" and the Robins‘ rendition of "White Cliffs of Dover" are included along with such marginalia as the Blisters‘ "Shortnin Bread" and the Poets‘ "Vowels of Love." Full of hits or not, the 20 numbers here are high quality, spanning the range of straight a cappella to combo R&B. The rich vocal tradition born in black churches is given secular wings throughout, informing both the Velvet Angels‘ utterly transcendent "I’m in Love" and King Odom 4’s sublimely terrestrial "All of Me." And adding to the fun are the LarksInk Spots-inspired "Lucy Brown," the Monograms’ malt shop bit of innocence "My Baby Dearest Darling," and Flamingos‘ rock & roll jumpin’ "Let’s Make Up." A record that never gets old.
Review by Stephen Cook

864_Risque Rhythm- Nasty 50s R&bThe blue blues compiled on Columbia’s Raunchy Business and reprised on Bluesville’s Bawdy Blues are novelty material. Voicing r&b’s revolt of the body against the cerebral demands of bebop, this stuff is sexy. Even the novelties–the original "My Ding-a-Ling," say–are carnal, and though the oft-collected "Work With Me Annie" and "Sixty-Minute Man" may be mild as poetry, they’re plenty physical as music. The Sultans’ "It Ain’t the Meat" and Connie Allen’s "Rocket 69" are plenty physical as poetry. And Wynonie Harris and Dinah Washington will make you want to fuck. The gift that keeps on giving for any music-lover whose genitalia you cherish.

You can listen to the Risqué Rhythm HERE
Review by Robert Christgau

Also highly recommended
864_gethot_03864_gethot_04864_gethot_02864_gethot_01

Read Full Post »

Teresa James, Long's Park on June 19Originally from Houston, Texas, Teresa is based in Los Angeles where she has assembled a group of some of the top LA based touring and session musicians in her band, The Rhythm Tramps. They have been working in the LA area and at blues festivals and clubs throughout the US and Europe for many years. For the last 12 years, the band has also been a favourite on Delbert McClinton’s Sandy Beaches Blues Cruise.

She has released 8 CDs  – her most recent, COME ON HOME, was released in August, 2012 and has been getting regular airplay on stations around the world and charting for weeks at a time on the Roots Radio Charts (topping off at the #3 spot). It has been listed on many ‘best of’ lists for 2012 and has been receiving raves reviews from writers and DJs everywhere.

Her 2008 release, THE BOTTOM LINE, garnered her a nomination by the Blues Foundation for Contemporary Blues Female Artist of the Year and her 2010 CD, YOU KNOW YOU LOVE IT,was a finalist for an Independent Music Award (IMA).

She has performed live with such legendary artists as Levon Helm, Delbert McClinton, Eric Burdon, Marcia Ball, Tommy Castro, Big Al Anderson, Kirk Whalum, and many others. Her voice is featured on albums by Randy Newman, Eric Burdon, Tommy Castro, Bill Medley, and Walter Trout, among others. She has also sung for television and movie soundtracks; She and her band were featured in the Disney movie and soundtrack for “HOLES“.

Teresa’s band is an eclectic mix of Los Angeles based musicians who have worked with a wide range of artists including: Jimmy Reed, Eric Burdon, Jackson Browne, Taj Mahal, Bonnie Raitt, Jennifer Warnes, Was Not Was, Johnny Nash and many, many others.

Text from teresajames.com

Read Full Post »

791_lavere_baker_01

Delores LaVern Baker (November 11, 1929 – March 10, 1997) was an American rhythm and blues singer, who had several hit records on the pop chart in the 1950s and early 1960s. Her most successful records were "Tweedlee Dee" (1955), "Jim Dandy" (1956), and "I Cried a Tear" (1958).

Career

791_lavere_baker_02She began singing in Chicago clubs such as the Club DeLisa around 1946, often billed as Little Miss Sharecropper, and first recorded under that name in 1949. She changed her name briefly to Bea Baker when recording for Okeh Records in 1951, and then became LaVern Baker when singing with Todd Rhodes and his band in 1952.

In 1953 she signed for Atlantic Records as a solo artist, her first release being "Soul on Fire". Her first hit came in early 1955, with the Latin-tempo "Tweedlee Dee" reaching #4 on the R&B chart and #14 on the national US pop charts.Georgia Gibbs‘ note-for-note cover of Baker’s "Tweedle Dee" reached #1; subsequently Baker made an unsuccessful attempt to sue her and petitioned Congress to consider such covers copyright violations.

791_lavere_baker_03Baker had a succession of hits on the R&B charts over the next couple of years with her backing group The Gliders, including "Bop-Ting-A-Ling" (#3 R&B), "Play It Fair" (#2 R&B), and "Still" (#4 R&B). At the end of 1956 she had another smash hit with "Jim Dandy" (#1 R&B, #17 pop). It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. Further hits followed for Atlantic, including the follow-up "Jim Dandy Got Married" (#7 R&B), "I Cried a Tear" (#2 R&B, #6 pop in 1959), "I Waited Too Long" (#5 R&B, #3 pop, written by Neil Sedaka), "Saved" (#17 R&B, written by Leiber and Stoller), and "See See Rider" (#9 R&B in 1963).

In addition to singing, Baker also did some work with Ed Sullivan and Alan Freed on TV and in films, including Rock, Rock, Rock and Mr. Rock & Roll. In 1964, she recorded a Bessie Smith tribute album, before leaving Atlantic and joining Brunswick Records, where she recorded the album "Let Me Belong to You".

In 1966, Baker recorded a duet single with Jackie Wilson. The controversial song, "Think Twice", featured raunchy lyrics that were not considered appropriate for airplay at that time or even today. Three versions were recorded, one of which is the X-rated version with the raunchy lyrics.

In the late 1960s, Baker became seriously ill after a trip to Vietnam to entertain American soldiers. While recovering at the US Subic Bay Naval Base in the Philippines, her husband, Slappy White filed for a divorce. A friend recommended that she stay on as the entertainment director at the Marine Corps Staff NCO club there, and she remained there for 22 years.

In 1988 she returned to perform at Madison Square Garden for Atlantic Records’ 40th anniversary. She then worked on the soundtracks to films such as Shag, (1989), Dick Tracy, (1990) and A Rage in Harlem (1991), which were all issued on CD. She also performed a song on Alan Parker‘s film Angel Heart (1987), which appeared on the original vinyl soundtrack album, but was not included on the later CD issue "for contractual reasons".

In 1990, she made her Broadway debut replacing Ruth Brown as star of the hit musical Black and Blue. In 1991, Rhino Records released a new album Live in Hollywood recorded at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill, as well as a compilation of her greatest Atlantic hits entitled Soul on Fire. In 1992, she recorded a well-received studio album, Woke Up This Morning, for DRG Records. She continued performing after having both legs amputated from diabetes complications in 1994 and made her last recording, "Jump Into the Fire," for the 1995 Harry Nilsson tribute CD, For the Love of Harry on the Music Masters label.

She received the 1990 Pioneer Award from the Rhythm and Blues Foundation. In 1991, Baker became the second female solo artist inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, following Aretha Franklin in 1987. Her song "Jim Dandy" was named one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll and was ranked #343 on the Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Text from Wikipedia

Read Full Post »

I’ve been listening to Afro-American music for nearly 50 years. And worst, I’ve enjoyed every minute of it – Ted

722_idiots

BLACK HISTORY IN IMAGES: New Orleans in 1960 was sharply divided over the practice of segregation, and the “Citizens’ Council of Greater New Orleans” advocated some pretty silly stuff, including a protest against black musicians. Please share so we may never forget! Image and text from BlackPast.org

Read Full Post »

696_irmaIrma Thomas (born February 18, 1941, Ponchatoula, Louisiana, United States) is an American singer from New Orleans. She is known as the “Soul Queen of New Orleans”.

Thomas is a contemporary of Aretha Franklin and Etta James, but never experienced their level of commercial success. In 2007, she won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album for After the Rain, her first Grammy in a career spanning over 50 years.

Life and career

Born Irma Lee, as a teen she sang with a Baptist church choir, auditioning for Specialty Records as a 13-year old. By the age of 19 she had been married twice and had four children. Keeping her second ex-husband’s surname, she worked as a waitress in New Orleans, occasionally singing with bandleader Tommy Ridgley, who helped her land a record deal with the local Ron label. Her first single, “(You Can Have My Husband but) Don’t Mess with My Man,” was released in spring 1960, and reached number 22 on the Billboard R&B chart.

She then began recording on the Minit label, working with songwriter and producer Allen Toussaint on songs including “It’s Raining” and “Ruler of my Heart”, which was later reinterpreted by Otis Redding as “Pain In My Heart”. Imperial Records acquired Minit in 1963, and a string of successful releases followed. These included “Wish Someone Would Care” (her biggest national hit), its B-side “Breakaway“, written by Jackie DeShannon and Sharon Sheely, (later covered by Tracey Ullman among others), “Anyone Who Knows What Love Is” (co-written by the young Randy Newman and future country star Jeannie Seely, among others), and “Time Is on My Side” (a song previously recorded by Kai Winding, and later by the Rolling Stones).

Although her first four Imperial singles all charted on Billboard’s pop chart, later releases were less successful, and, unlike her contemporaries Aretha Franklin, Gladys Knight and Dionne Warwick, she never managed to cross over into mainstream commercial success. She recorded for Chess Records in 1967/68 with some success, the Otis Redding song “Good To Me” reaching the R&B chart. She then relocated to California, releasing records on various small labels, before returning to Louisiana, and in the early 1980s opened her own club, the Lion’s Den.

Down By Law, the 1986 independent film by Jim Jarmusch features “It’s Raining” in the soundtrack. The film’s actors Roberto Benigni and Nicoletta Braschi, whose characters fall in love in the movie, dance to this song.

After several years’ break from recording, she was signed by Rounder Records, and in 1991 earned her first-ever Grammy Award nomination for Live! Simply the Best, recorded in San Francisco. She subsequently released a number of traditional gospel albums, together with more secular recordings. The album Sing It! was nominated for a Grammy in 1999.

Thomas is still active as a performer, appearing annually at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. She reigned as Queen of the Krewe du Vieux for the 1998 New Orleans Mardi Gras season. She often headlined at her own club, which is now out of business due to the effects of Hurricane Katrina. Thomas relocated to Gonzales, Louisiana, 60 miles (97 km) from New Orleans, after Hurricane Katrina. According to her web site she is now back in her home in New Orleans.

Thomas and her husband owned the Lion’s Den Club near the French Quarter of New Orleans.

In April 2007, Thomas was honored for her contributions to Louisiana music with induction into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame. Also in 2007, Thomas accepted an invitation to participate in Goin’ Home: A Tribute to Fats Domino where, singing withMarcia Ball, she contributed “I Just Can’t Get New Orleans Off My Mind”.

In August 2009, a compilation album with three new songs titled The Soul Queen of New Orleans: 50th Anniversary Celebrationwas released from Rounder Records to commemorate Thomas’ 50th year as a recording artist.

Thomas was the subject of the 2008 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival poster. She was chosen as the subject before the painting was chosen for the poster. Artist Douglas Bourgeois painted the singer in 2006. In 2010, Thomas rode in the New Orleans parade “Grela”. In April that year, Thomas performed at the Corner Hotel, Richmond.

During Easter 2011, Thomas performed twice at the Bluesfest music festival in Byron Bay, New South Wales, Australia. On April 24, she performed on the Crossroads stage, coming on after Mavis Staples; then on April 25, she headlined the Crossroads stage, coming on after Jethro Tull and Osibisa.

In December 2011, Thomas’ track “Anyone Who Knows What Love Is (Will Understand)” was featured in Charlie Brooker‘s Black Mirror in the second instalment entitled “15 Million Merits”.

In 2013, Thomas was nominated for a Blues Music Award in the ‘Soul Blues Female Artist’ category, which she duly won.

Text from Wikipedia

My Irma Thomas CDs and LPs are still in the all to large stack of record still not ripped to mp3 so you’ll have ti maake do with videos for now – Red

Read Full Post »

I was rightly corrected by “loveless” for having used a picture of Savannah Churchill instead of Lucille Hegamin on my Lucille Hegamin post so I thought it only right to present Savannah Churchill for you as she too is one of my favourites – Ted


684_savannah churchill_02Savannah Churchill (August 21, 1920, Colfax, Louisiana – April 19, 1974, Brooklyn, New York) was a successful American singer of pop, jazz, and blues music in the 1940s and 1950s.

Career

Born Savannah Valentine to Creole parents, she was raised in Brooklyn, and started singing in 1941 to support her family after her husband David Churchill was killed in a car accident. Her first recordings, including the risqué "Fat Meat Is Good Meat", were issued on Beacon Records in 1942. These were followed the next year by recordings on Capitol with the Benny Carter Orchestra, including her first hit "Hurry, Hurry".

684_savannah churchill_01In 1945 she signed with Irving Berman‘s Manor Records, and that year "Daddy Daddy" reached # 3 on the R&B chart. Two years later she had her only R&B # 1 with "I Want To Be Loved (But Only By You)", which topped the charts for eight weeks. The record was billed as being with vocal group The Sentimentalists, who soon renamed themselves The Four Tunes. Subsequent recordings with The Four Tunes, including "Time Out For Tears" (# 10 R&B, # 24 pop) and "I Want To Cry", both in 1948, were also successful.

Billed as "Sex-Sational", she performed to much acclaim, and appeared in the movies Miracle in Harlem (1948) and Souls of Sin (1949). She toured widely with backing vocal group The Striders, including a visit to Hawaii in 1954. From 1949 she recorded with Regal, RCA Victor and Decca Records, recording the original version of "Shake A Hand", later a big hit forFaye Adams, and also recording with the Ray Charles Singers. In 1956 she was one of the first artists signed to the Argolabel, set up as a subsidiary to Chess Records.

Tragedy struck later in 1956 to end her career. She was singing on stage in a club, when a drunken man fell on top of her from a balcony above, causing severe debilitating injuries from which she would never fully recover. Although she did some recording in 1960, her health declined greatly until her death in 1974, at the age of 53.684_savannah churchill_04


These recordings are from a cd produced in Salerno, Italy in 2001. It is made by ripping old 78 rpm records so the quality is not absolutely top, but it gives you an idea of what a magnificent singer Savannah Churchill was – Ted

684_savannah churchill_04 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
When You Come Back To Me
Savannah Churchill
 & The Striders
Queen Of R&B 
1950 
2001
Rhythm’n’Blues
http://color=#333333When%20You%20Come%20Back%20To%20Me
684_savannah churchill_04 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Changeable You
Savannah Churchill & The Striders
 
Queen Of R&B
1950
2001
Rhythm’n’Blues
http://color=#333333Changeable%20You
684_savannah churchill_04 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry
Savannah Churchill & The King Odom Four

Queen Of R&B
1952
2001 
Rhythm’n’Blues
http://color=#333333I'm%20So%20Lonesome%20I%20Could%20Cry
Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

560_melissa_martin_01Philadelphia based Melissa Martin is one of today’s leading Blues and Swing vocalists. Long-time leading lady of the blues, Melissa’s voice and performance simmer irresistibly. Equally adept at Rockin’ Jump Blues, Drivin’ R&B and Jazzy torch ballads, Melissa Martin and her Mighty Rhythm Kings lay it down and thrill crowds from the first downbeat to the final encore. Etta James biographer Vince White pens, “Melissa Martin has all three S’s, she’s sexy, sassy, and soulful.” “Her pipes truly have a wealth of soaring thrill… like honey spiked with whiskey, sweet and bracing all at the same time.” adds Blueswax Magazine.

In addition to thrilling vocals, a typical Mighty Rhythm Kings performance spotlights a top-notch crew of versatile musicians, Gutbucket Blues? Check, Sophisticated Swing? Check, New Orleans two-step? Check, Boogie Woogie 560_melissa_martin_02piano? Check, Smoldering R&B? Got It, Deep Rockin’ Roots of all sorts?… it’s in there. Arriving on the Philadelphia scene in 1995, Melissa formed the Mighty Rhythm Kings with a like minded group of blues enthusiasts. They proceeded to rock the house all up and down the East Coast, playing clubs, festivals, dance societies, house parties, and concerts. They were the right band at the right time, landing smack dab in the middle of the Swing revival.

Their debut CD “On The Mark” was recorded and released in 2003, drawing rave reviews world wide. “A sparkling and often downright splendid debut CD…the rhythms are tight, the solos are solid as a rock…every song is slicked up and polished like a treasure.

Text from last.fm

cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Send me to the ‘lectric chair  
Melissa Martin & The Mighty Rhythm Kings
  
Lucky Girl 
2009
2009
Gutbucket Blues, Sophisticated Swing and more 
cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
How can I sing the blues
Melissa Martin & The Mighty Rhythm Kings 
Lucky Girl
2009
2009
Gutbucket Blues, Sophisticated Swing and more
cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Everything I do is wrong
Melissa Martin & The Mighty Rhythm Kings 
 
Lucky Girl
2009
2009
Gutbucket Blues, Sophisticated Swing and more
Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

547_sugarpie_03Sugar Pie DeSanto (born Umpeylia Marsema Balinton, October 16, 1935, Brooklyn, New York, United States) is a Filipino-American rhythm and blues singer of the 1950s and 1960s.

Career
In 1955, DeSanto did some touring with The Johnny Otis Revue. Otis gave her her stage name. From 1959 to 1960, she toured with The James Brown Revue.

In 1960, DeSanto rose to national prominence when her single "I Want to Know" reached number four on Billboard’s Hot R&B chart. She recorded the song with her husband Pee Wee Kingsley. Soon thereafter her marriage to Kingsley fell apart, and DeSanto moved to Chicago and signed with Chess Records in 1962 as a recording artist and writer. Among her recordings at Chess were "Slip-In Mules", "Use What You 547_sugarpie_01Got", "Soulful Dress" (her biggest hit at Chess), and "I Don’t Wanna Fuss". DeSanto participated in the American Folk Blues Festival tour of Europe in 1964, and her lively performances, including wild dancing and standing back flips, were widely appreciated.

In 1965 DeSanto, under the name Peylia Parham, began a writing collaboration with Shena DeMell. They produced the song "Do I Make Myself Clear", which DeSanto sang as a duet with Etta James, which reached the top 10. It was followed up by a 1966 DeSanto-James duet, "In the Basement". DeSanto’s next song, "Go Go Power", did not chart, and DeSanto and Chess parted ways.

Sugar Pie DeSanto kept on writing songs and recorded for a few more labels without much success; she eventually moved back to the Bay Area, settling in Oakland.

Though it had often been said that her stage performances far surpassed her studio recordings, a full length live recording, Classic Sugar Pie, was not released until 1997.

DeSanto was given a Bay Area Music Award in 1999 for best female blues singer. In September 2008, she was given a Pioneer Award by the Rhythm and Blues Foundation. DeSanto received a lifetime achievement award from the Goldie Awards in November 2009.

cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Soulful Dress
Sugar Pie DeSanto
 
Down In The Basement (The Chess Years)
1964
1997
Rhythm ‘n blues
cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Use What You Got
Sugar Pie DeSanto
 
Down In The Basement (The Chess Years)
1964
1997
Rhythm ‘n blues
Go Go Power (kent 317) Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Go Go Power
Sugar Pie DeSanto
 
Go Go Power (Kent)
1966 
2008
Rhythm ‘n blues
Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

486_mickey_championBorn in Lake Charles, LA, powerhouse blues singer Mickey Champion has worked with the likes of T-Bone Walker, Little Esther Phillips, Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Ray Charles, Jackie Wilson, and many others in her long but unfortunately largely unsung five-decade career. Discovered in L.A. (where she continues to make her home in the Crenshaw District) by bandleader and ever-vigilant talent scout Johnny Otis, Champion recorded several impressive R&B sides in the 1950s and early ’60s, none of which established her as a household name. The wife of bandleader Roy Milton until his death, Champion began recording again in 2000, releasing I Am Your Living Legend! that year, followed by What You Want in 2003, both on Tondef Records. She was the subject of a video documentary produced by Paul Vic and Oletha Rogers called Champion Blues, and in 2008 Ace U.K. issued her collected singles from the 1950s and 1960s under the title Bam a Lam: The R&B Recordings 1950-1962

These three recordings are from that Collection – Ted:

front Title:
Artist: Recording: Released: Genre:
I’m A Woman 
Mickey Champion 
Bam a Lam:The R&B Recordings 1950 – 1962
July 15, 2008
Jazz Blues / Jump Blues

http://color=#333333I’m%20A%20Woman
front Title:
Artist: Recording:  Released: Genre:
I’ve Got It Bad
Mickey Champion 
Bam a Lam:The R&B Recordings 1950 – 1962
July 15, 2008
Jazz Blues / Jump Blues

http://color=#333333I’ve%20Got%20It%20Bad
front Title:
Artist: Recording: Released: Genre:
I’m Telling You
Mickey Champion 
Bam a Lam:The R&B Recordings 1950 – 1962
July 15, 2008
Jazz Blues / Jump Blues

http://color=#333333I’m%20Telling%20You

Text from allmusic.com

Read Full Post »

Cooke_Sam_017.jpg

I’ve been on a Sam Cooke high all week, and hardly played anything else on the turntables or the mp3-player. I’ve got twelve solo records with the man and four he did with The Soul Stirrers. 387 cuts. Some doublets, even triples, sure, but who cares. Anything the man did is worth listening to both two and three times – Ted

468_sam2 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Another Saturday Night
Sam Cooke
Portrait Of A Legend – 1951 – 1964
February 28, 1963
June 17, 2003
Soul, Rhythm ‘n’ blues

468_sam2 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Twisting The Night Away
Sam Cooke
Portrait Of A Legend – 1951 – 1964
January 9, 1962
June 17, 2003
Soul, Rhythm ‘n’ blues

468_sam2 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
A Change Is Gonna Come
Sam Cooke
Portrait Of A Legend – 1951 – 1964
January 30, 1964
June 17, 2003
Soul, Rhythm ‘n’ blues

On December 11, 1964, Cooke was fatally shot by the manager of the Hacienda Motel in Los Angeles, California, at the age of 33. At the time, the courts ruled that Cooke was drunk and distressed, and that the manager had killed Cooke in what was later ruled a justifiable homicide. Since that time, the circumstances of his death have been widely questioned.

This is 50 years ago now, and still Sam Cooke’s music is vibrant, alive and able to fill at least my mind with a deep respect and my heart with joy – Ted

recipereminiscing_banner_505x60

Read Full Post »

coverBetty Hall Jones, born Betty Hall Bigby (January 11, 1911 – April 20, 2009), was an American pianist and singer. She was born in Topeka, Kansas.

Jones’s father was George Arthur Bigby, a cornetist and leader of a brass band. She learned piano from her uncle in California, where she was raised after her family moved there when she was a child. In 1926, she married a banjoist whose last name was Hall but was divorced by 1936, when she got a job as a backup pianist for Buster Moten in Kansas City. She then returned to Los Angeles to play with Roy Milton through 1942, then joined Luke Jones’s trio, with whom she recorded. She married Jasper Jones in the middle of the decade and recorded as Betty Hall Jones in 1947 and 1949 for Atomic Records and Capitol Records. She recorded frequently in the 1950s and worked at the Hotel Sorrento in Seattle, Washington, for seven years. In the 1960s and 1970s she did USO tours in East Asia and toured Australia and Mexico in addition to regular dates in nightclubs on Sunset Boulevard. She toured Sweden and England in the 1980s, and continued performing into the 1990s.

A compilation of her recordings, The Complete Recordings 1947-1954, was issued in 2005. These two tracks are from a 2011 release of that cd:

   

Tittle: That Early Morning Boogie
Album: Lady Blows The Blues – The Complete Recordings 1947-1954
Artist: Betty Hall Jones 
Released: 2011
Genre:
Classic Rhythm’N’Blues

   

Tittle: This Joint’s Too Hip For Me 
Album: Lady Blows The Blues – The Complete Recordings 1947-1954
Artist: Betty Hall Jones 
Released:
2011
Genre: Classic Rhythm’N’Blues

Read Full Post »

389_hadda_brooks_01Hadda Brooks (October 29, 1916 – November 21, 2002), was an American pianist, vocalist and composer. Her first single, “Swingin’ the Boogie”, which she composed, was issued in 1945. She was billed as “Queen of the Boogie.” Highlights of her life included singing at Hawaii’s official statehood ceremony in 1959 and being asked for a private audience with Pope Pius XII.

Life and career
She was born Hadda Hapgood on October 29, 1916 and raised in the Boyle Heights area of Los Angeles, by her parents, who had migrated to California from the South. Her mother, Goldie Wright, was a doctor and her father, John Hapgood, a deputy sheriff. Her grandfather, Samuel Alexander Hopgood (October 22, 1857 – November 30, 1944), moved to California from Atlanta, Georgia, and proved to be an enormous influence on Brooks. He introduced her to theater and the operatic voices of Amelita Galli-Curci and Enrico Caruso. In her youth she formally studied classical music with an Italian piano instructor, Florence Bruni, with whom she trained for twenty years. She attended the University of Chicago, and later, returned to Los Angeles. She came to love the subtle comedy of black theater and vaudeville entertainer and 389_hadda_brooks_03singer Bert Williams. Brooks began playing piano professionally in the early 1940s at a tap-dance studio owned by Hollywood choreographer and dancer Willie Covan. For ten dollars a week, she played the popular tunes of the day while Covan worked with such stars as Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, and Shirley Temple. Brooks was married briefly during this period to a Harlem Globetrotter named Earl “Shug” Morrison in 1941. She toured with the team when they traveled. Morrison developed pulmonary pneumonia, however, and died about a year after they were married. It was Brooks’ only marriage.

Brooks actually preferred ballads to boogie-woogie, but worked up her style by listening to Albert Ammons, Pete Johnson, and Meade Lux Lewis records. Her first recording, the pounding “Swingin’ the Boogie,” for Jules Bihari’s Modern Records, was a sizable regional hit in 1945, and another R&B Top Ten with “Out of the Blue,” her most famous song. It was Jules Bihari who gave her the recording name Hadda Brooks. Clarinetist and bandleader Benny Goodman 389_hadda_brooks_02recommended Brooks to a film director friend of his who placed her in the film Out of the Blue in 1947. Encouraged by orchestra leader Charlie Barnet, Brooks practiced singing “You Won’t Let Me Go,” and the song became her first vocal recording in 1947. She usually played the small part of a lounge piano player in films, and often sang the title song. “Out of the Blue” became a top hit for Brooks, “Boogie Woogie Blues” followed in 1948, and she appeared in In a Lonely Place (1950) starring Humphrey Bogart, and in The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) with Lana Turner and Kirk Douglas. Brooks became the first African-American woman to host her own television show in 1957. The Hadda Brooks Show, a combination talk and musical entertainment show, aired on Los Angeles’ KCOP-TV. The show opened with Brooks seated behind a grand piano, cigarette smoke curling about her, and featured “That’s My Desire” as her theme song. She appeared in 26 half-hour episodes of the show, which were broadcast live in Los Angeles and repeated on KGO in San Francisco. She commuted to Europe in the 1970s for performances in nightclubs and festivals, but performed rarely in the United States, living for many years in Australia and Hawaii. Following the 1984 release of Queen of the Boogie a compilation of recordings from the 40’s, two years later manager Alan Eichler brought her out of a 16-year retirement to open a new jazz room at the historic Perino’s in Los Angeles, after which she continued to play nightclubs regularly in Hollywood, San Francisco, and New York, to rave reviews.

In 1993, Brooks was presented with the prestigious Pioneer Award by Bonnie Raitt on behalf of the Smithsonian-based Rhythm and Blues Foundation, in a ceremony held at the Hollywood Palace. Brooks returned to movies with a cameo in Jack Nicholson’s film The Crossing Guard (1995), directed by Sean Penn, in which she sang “Anytime, Anyplace, Anywhere.” Three years later she made another singing appearance in The Thirteenth Floor (1999). Her last performance on screen was an acting role in “John John in the Sky” (2000).

She resumed her recording career with the 1994 album “Anytime, Anyplace, Anywhere” for DRG. Meanwhile Virgin Records had acquired the old Modern catalogue and because of Brooks’ new-found success issued a compilation of her 40’s and 50’s recordings entitled “That’s My Desire”. They also signed her to record three new songs for the Christmas album “Even Santa Gets the Blues,” made more unusual by the fact she had releases on the same label made 50 years apart. Her 1996 album for Virgin, “Time Was When,” featured Al Viola (Guitar), Eugene Wright (Bass) and Richard Dodd (Cello), and she wrote two of its songs: “You Go Your Way and I’ll Go Crazy” and “Mama’s Blues.” She began playing at hip nightclubs like actor Johnny Depp’s Viper Room, New York’s Algonquin Hotel Oak Room and Michael’s Pub and such Hollywood haunts as Goldfinger’s, the Vine St. Bar and Grill and the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill. She celebrated her 80th birthday by performing two full shows at Depp’s Viper Room.

In 2000, the Los Angeles Music Awards honored Hadda Brooks with the “Lifetime Achievement Award.”

Hadda Brooks died at White Memorial Medical Center in Los Angeles, following open-heart surgery at age 86.

In 2007, a 72-minute documentary, Queen of the Boogie, directed by Austin Young & Barry Pett, was presented at the Los Angeles Silver Lake Film Festival.

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Read Full Post »

cover  

Tittle: Let Me Down Easy
Album: Bluesoul Belles: The Complete Calla, Port & Roulette Recordings
Artist: Bettye LaVette – Released: 2005
Genre: Rhythm N’ Blues, Soul

Capitol-EMI(FR)-1546721-Ella-Mae-Morse-Barrelhouse-Front  

Tittle: 40 Cups Of Coffee
Album: Barrelhouse, Boogie & Blues
Artist: Ella Mae Morse
Released: 1954
Genre: Jazz/Blues vocal

cover  

Tittle: In The Basement, Part One
Album: Down In The Basement (The Chess Years)
Artist: Sugar Pie DeSanto
Released: 1997
Genre:
Rhythm N’ Blues/Blues vocal

Front  

Tittle: I’ve Got To Get Away From It All (Version 1)
Album: Shades of Mitty Collier – The Chess Singles (1961-1968)
Artist: Mitty Collier – Released: 2008
Genre:
Rhythm N’ Blues vocal

cover  

Tittle: What Happened To The Real Me 
Album: Only For The Lonely
Artist: Mavis Staples 
Released: 1970
Genre: Soul vocal

WordPress has a simple shortcode that places a music player right into your posts and thanks to some friendly e-mail coaching from Russ at Russ & Gary’s "The Best Years of Music" I am now able to use this code as you can see. If you are in any way interested in music from the days they knew how to make it their blog is a goldmine of sweet sound – Ted

From now on I’ll give you a little taste of my 3500+ records every now and then. Suggestions might be accepted if I should happen to have the track you want to hear – Ted

Read Full Post »

348_mary wells_01Mary Esther Wells (May 13, 1943 – July 26, 1992) was an American singer who helped to define the emerging sound of Motown in the early 1960s. Along with the Supremes, the Miracles, the Temptations, and the Four Tops, Wells was said to have been part of the charge in black music onto radio stations and record shelves of mainstream America, "bridging the color lines in music at the time."

With a string of hit singles composed mainly by Smokey Robinson, including "Two Lovers" (1962), the Grammy-nominated "You Beat Me to the Punch" (1962) and her signature hit, "My Guy" (1964), she became recognized as "The Queen of Motown" until her departure from the company in 1964, at the height of her popularity. She was one of Motown’s first singing superstars.

Early life and initial recordings
Mary Esther Wells was born near Detroit’s Wayne State University on May 13, 1943, to a mother who worked as a domestic, and an absentee father. One of three children, she contracted spinal meningitis at the age of two and struggled with partial blindness, deafness in one ear and temporary paralysis. During her early years, Wells lived in a poor residential Detroit district. By age 12, she was helping her mother with house cleaning work. She described the ordeal years later:

"Daywork they called it, and it was damn cold on hallway linoleum. Misery is Detroit linoleum in January—with a half-froze bucket of Spic-and-Span."—Mary Wells

348_mary wells_02Wells used singing as her comfort from her pain and by age 10 had graduated from church choirs to performing at local nightclubs in the Detroit area. Wells graduated from Detroit’s Northwestern High School at the age of 17 and set her sights on becoming a scientist, but after hearing about the success of Detroit musicians such as Jackie Wilson and the Miracles, she decided to try her hand at music as a singer-songwriter.

In 1960, 17-year-old Wells approached Tamla Records founder Berry Gordy at Detroit’s Twenty Grand club with a song she had intended for Jackie Wilson to record, since Wells knew of Gordy’s collaboration with Wilson. However, a tired Gordy insisted Wells sing the song in front of him. Impressed, Gordy had Wells enter Detroit’s United Sound Studios to record the single, titled "Bye Bye Baby". After a reported 22 takes, Gordy signed Wells to the Motown subsidiary of his expanding record label and released the song as a single in September 1960; it peaked at No 8 on the R&B chart in 1961, and later crossed over to the pop singles chart, where it peaked at number 45.

Wells’ early Motown recordings reflected a rougher R&B sound than the smoother style of her biggest hits. Wells became the first Motown female artist to have a Top 40 pop single after the Mickey Stevenson-penned doo-wop song, "I Don’t Want to Take a Chance", hit No. 33 in June,1961. In the fall of that year, Motown issued her first album and released a third single, the bluesy ballad "Strange Love". When that record bombed, Gordy set Wells up with the Miracles’ lead singer Smokey Robinson. Though she was hailed as "the first lady of Motown", Wells was technically Motown’s third female signed act: Claudette Rogers, of Motown’s first star group the Miracles, has been referred to by Berry Gordy as "the first lady of Motown Records" due to her being signed as a member of the group, and in late 1959 Detroit blues-gospel singer Mable John had signed to the then-fledging label a year prior to Wells’ arrival. Nevertheless, Wells’ early hits as one of the label’s few female solo acts did make her the label’s first female star and its first fully successful solo artist.

Success
Wells’ teaming with Robinson led to a succession of hit singles over the following two years. Their first collaboration, 1962’s "The One Who Really Loves You", was Wells’ first smash hit, peaking at No. 2 on the R&B chart and No. 8 on the Hot 100. The song featured a calypso-styled soul production that defined Wells’ early hits. Motown released the similar-sounding "You Beat Me to the Punch" a few months later. The song became her first R&B No. 1 single and peaked at No. 9 on the pop chart. The success of "You Beat Me to the Punch" helped to make Wells the first Motown star to be nominated for a Grammy Award when the song received a nod in the Best Rhythm & Blues Recording category.

In late 1962, "Two Lovers" became Wells’ third consecutive single to hit the Top 10 of Billboard’s Hot 100, peaking at No. 7 and becoming her second No. 1 hit on the R&B charts. This helped to make Wells the first female solo artist to have three consecutive Top 10 singles on the pop chart. The track sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. Wells’ second album, also titled The One Who Really Loves You, was released in 1962 and peaked at No. 8 on the pop albums chart, making the teenage singer a breakthrough star and giving her clout at Motown. Wells’ success at the label was recognized when she became a headliner during the first string of Motortown Revue concerts, starting in the fall of 1962. The singer showcased a rawer stage presence that contrasted with her softer R&B recordings.

Wells’ success continued in 1963 when she hit the Top 20 with the doo-wop ballad "Laughing Boy" and scored three additional Top 40 singles, "Your Old Standby", "You Lost the Sweetest Boy", and its B-side, "What’s Easy for Two Is So Hard for One". "You Lost the Sweetest Boy" was one of the first hit singles composed by the successful Motown songwriting and producing trio of Holland-Dozier-Holland, though Robinson remained Wells’ primary producer.

Also in 1963, Wells recorded a session of successful B-sides that arguably became as well known as her hits, including "Operator", "What Love Has Joined Together", "Two Wrongs Don’t Make a Right" and "Old Love (Let’s Try It Again)". Wells and Robinson also recorded a duet titled "I Want You ‘Round", which would be re-recorded by Marvin Gaye and Kim Weston.

348_mary wells_03In 1964, Wells recorded "My Guy". The Smokey Robinson song became her trademark single, reaching No. 1 on the Cashbox R&B chart for seven weeks and becoming the No. 1 R&B single of the year. The song successfully crossed over to the Billboard Hot 100, where it eventually replaced Louis Armstrong’s "Hello, Dolly!" at No. 1, remaining there for two weeks. The song became Wells’ second million-selling single.

To build on the song’s success, Motown released a duet album recorded with fellow Motown singing star Marvin Gaye, Together. The album peaked at No. 1 on the R&B album chart and No. 42 on the pop album chart, and yielded the double-sided hits "Once Upon a Time" and "What’s the Matter With You Baby".

"My Guy" was one of the first Motown songs to break on the other side of the Atlantic, eventually peaking at No. 5 on the UK chart and making Wells an international star. Around this time, the Beatles stated that Wells was their favorite American singer, and soon she was given an invitation to open for the group during their tour of the United Kingdom, thus making her the first Motown star to perform in the UK. Wells was only one of three female singers to open for the Beatles, the others being Brenda Holloway and Jackie DeShannon. Wells made friends with all four Beatles and later released a tribute album, Love Songs to the Beatles, in mid-decade.

Former Motown sales chief Barney Ales described Wells’ landmark success in 1964: "In 1964, Mary Wells was our big, big artist, I don’t think there’s any audience with an age of 30 through 50 that doesn’t know the words to My Guy."

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

intro_illIn one sense, the term ‘soul’ has simply been a convenient label for the record industry to attach to the music that sells to young Afro Americans, replacing earlier tags like ‘race music’ and ‘rhythm & blues’. It has been used in the seventies to refer to an increasingly broad and diverse range of styles. But its entry into widespread usage around 1964 did coincide with a distinct shift of emphasis in the dominant stylistic approach in the Afro Americans field.

Read the whole article HERE

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

284_lula_reed_02Born Lula Marietta McClelland, 21 March 1921, Minjo Junction, Ohio. Died 21 June 2008, Detroit, Michigan

An attractive singer in whom the seed of soul is particularly strong, Lula Reed belongs to that coterie of stylists who closely followed the lead of Dinah Washington in the early 1950s. Many sounded like little girls – many were little girls – but Lula, like Dinah, clearly wasn’t. Unlike Dinah, her switch from praising the Lord to singing the Devil’s music was more of a wrench for her and it ultimately resulted in Lula turning her back on the limelight and retreating to the welcoming bosom of Christianity.

According to her King press kit, Lula Reed was born in Port Clinton, Ohio, possibly in 1927. She found her voice singing in her local church choir and was taken under the wing of Professor Harold Boggs, who nurtured the young 284_lula_reed_01talent. Himself a well-known gospel singer, Boggs began his recording career on King Records in Cincinnati in August 1952, about six months after Lula had made her well-starred debut for the label with Sonny Thompson‘s Orchestra. Her only national hits would prove to be those first two Henry Glover-penned songs recorded as vocalist with Thompson’s band on 14th December 1951: “Let’s Call It A Day” attained the #7 position of the Billboard Rhythm & Blues Chart, while “I’ll Drown in My Tears” surpassed it to stall at #5. The former song was revived by Billy Gayles and Ike Turner in 1956, while the latter – retitled Drown in My Own Tears – was taken to the top of the Billboard R&B chart in early 1956 by Ray Charles on Atlantic, since which time it has been covered dozens of times by artists as diverse as The Righteous Brothers, Dinah Washington, Aretha Franklin, and Blood, Sweat & Tears.

From early 1953, with two big R&B hits under her belt, Reed began enjoying releases under her own name, although the backing band was invariably still Thompson’s. Sadly, despite the commercial promise of her first two releases and being voted the nation’s #4 rhythm and blues singer by The Cash Box trade magazine in 1954, Reed spent six more years with King Records searching in vain for another elusive hit. She and her now husband, Sonny Thompson, took a break from the label from 1958 to 1960, with Reed spending two years with Chess’ Argo subsidiary (during which time, King released her only solo LP “Blue and Moody”), but they returned briefly to the fold in 1961, recording on the Federal label. The following year Reed was teamed up with Freddy King for a handful of duets and the celebrated “Boy Girl Boy” LP on the King label, but by the end of 1962 she had left the company, left Cincinnati and left Thompson to spend a year with the label owned by her early admirer Ray Charles – Tangerine Records.

coverBy late 1963 it was all over: always one of those troubled artists in whom the secular constantly warred with a more dominant spiritual side, Lula Reed quit the world of R&B in the early 1960s to go back home and the church that had uncovered her talent. All efforts to contact her and interview her about her “wicked” recording career have since been rebuffed.


Text by Dave Penny found at
Black Cat Rockabilly

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

268_Rhythm & BluesThe history of modem pop and rock music consists essentially of the eruption of Afro American styles into the white dominated entertainment industry. It is not a question of Afro American forms influencing the mainstream, as some accounts would have it. In an aesthetic if not a commercial sense, the Afro American popular tradition is in itself better described as the mainstream.

Afro American in America have, of course, been heavily influenced by the majority musical cuIture for three centuries. But because they have generally had to absorb and re-create those influences in the context of exclusion from or repression by white society, mixing the ‘European’ elements with what had been retained from Africa, their music developed a separate identity; and as particular styles were adopted by, and adapted for, the mass entertainment market, the Afro American audience continued to demand that its own distinctive tastes were satisfied.

Read the whole article HERE

Read Full Post »

240_wynona_carr_001Wynona Carr (August 23, 1924 – May 12, 1976) was an African-American gospel, R&B and rock and roll singer-songwriter, who recorded as Sister Wynona Carr when performing gospel material.

Biography
Wynona Merceris Carr was born in Cleveland, Ohio, where she started out as a gospel singer, forming her own five-piece group The Carr Singers around 1945 and touring the Cleveland/Detroit area. Being tipped by The Pilgrim Travelers, who shared a bill with Carr in the late 1940s, Art Rupe signed her to his Specialty label,  giving Carr her new stage name "Sister" Wynona Carr (modelled after pioneering gospel singer Sister Rosetta Tharpe) and cutting some twenty sides with her from 1949 to 1954, including a couple of duets with Specialty’s biggest gospel star at the time, Brother Joe May.

240_wynona_carr_003Not having too much success on the charts (except for "The Ball Game" (1952), which became one of Specialty’s best selling gospel records and most recently featured in the movie 42), Carr grew increasingly unhappy with the straight gospel direction of her career and pleaded with Rupe to let her record "pops, jumps, ballads, and semi-blues". Rupe relented and from 1955 to 1959 Carr recorded two dozen rock & roll and R&B sides for Specialty, which, like her gospel songs, she mostly wrote herself. Despite scoring an R&B hit with "Should I Ever Love Again?" in 1957, overall the change from spiritual to secular music didn’t help Carr much in terms of sales or recognition. Unfortunately she also contracted tuberculosis around this time, which kept her from doing the necessary promotional work and touring for two years, effectively ending her tenure with Specialty in the summer of 1959.

In 1961 Carr signed with Frank Sinatra’s Reprise Records and released an unsuccessful pop album. She moved back to Cleveland, sinking into obscurity and suffering from declining health and depression; she died there in 1976.

Style and appreciation
C
arr’s contralto vocals have a sensual, husky quality quite unusual (or even inappropriate) for gospel singers in her day, which made her eventual switch to R&B and rock & roll seem a logical choice in retrospect. The same goes for her idiosyncratic use of metaphors and themes in her gospel songs: Baseball ("The Ball Game"), boxing ("15 Rounds For Jesus") and a popular TV show ("Dragnet For Jesus"). This penchant for novelty-like songs also shows in Carr’s later R&B repertoire, for instance "Ding Dong Daddy", "Nursery Rhyme Rock" and "Boppity Bop (Boogity Boog)".

240_wynona_carr_002Carr’s gospel recordings are very much influenced by Sister Rosetta Tharpe, incorporating blues and jazz stylings and already touching on R&B with her take on Roy Brown’s / Wynonie Harris’ "Good Rockin’ Tonight", entitled "I Heard The News (Jesus Is Coming Again)". Her early R&B material (for which she is probably best remembered now) was often uptempo, rock & roll-styled and similar in sound to fellow R&B / rock & roll artists on the Specialty roster like Little Richard, Lloyd Price and Larry Williams, with a strong New Orleans-style backbeat and a rich, warm production. Her final Specialty sessions, conducted by Sonny Bono in 1959, cut down on the rock & roll influences.

Both Carr’s gospel and R&B recordings went largely unappreciated during the time they were released, but found a new audience when Specialty Records released two CDs, covering Carr’s entire output on the label and adding previously unreleased material, such as a recording with Rev. C.L. Franklin (father of Aretha Franklin) and his New Bethel Baptist Church Choir in Detroit.

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

263_vynonna Carr 
The next 7 days you’ll find all
tracks from this LP in the box
widget in the right column

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: