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Archive for the ‘Soft drinks and sodas’ Category

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Asina is an orange soda produced by the small soda plants in Norway. it was launched in 1948 as an orange soda for the small plants among the members of the Soda Factory Association, meant as a competitor to Solo, also an orange soda, Norway’s most popular soda at the time – I had a bottle of Asina yesterday – Ted 😉

Image found on Roma soda plant’s Facebook page

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Grapette is a grape-flavored soft drink that was first produced and marketed in 1939 by Benjamin "Tyndle" Fooks. Grapette is now produced by Grapette International, and is marketed in the United States by Wal-Mart as part of its Sam’s Choice line of soft drinks.

Development

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Grapette was developed by Benjamin "Tyndle" Fooks when, while working as a traveling salesman selling a product known as "Fooks Flavors", he noticed the popularity of his grape flavor. From this, Fooks, dissatisfied with existing grape a12119_grapette_03sodas on the market, sought to develop a grape soda that tasted the way he believed that a grape soda should taste. Over the course of two years and tens of thousands of taste tests, by 1939, he had developed a flavor that he believed was superior to all other grape sodas available at the time.

To name the drink, Fooks turned to Hubert Owen. Owen and an assistant ran a local contest to come up with a name, but this failed to produce a suitable name. Owen then traveled to Washington, D.C. in 1939 to search the trademark files of the United States Patent Office for a suitable name. Here, it was found that a man named Rube Goldstein owned a trademark for the name "Grapette", "Orangette", and "Lemonette". Further research determined that Goldstein owned a small bottling firm that produced a drink that used one of Fooks’ grape flavors, called "Tiny", which it distributed in Virginia and North Carolina, marketed in a six-ounce bottle. Goldstein, however, had never used the a12119_grapette_04Grapette, Orangette, or Lemonette names. In March 1940, Fooks and Owen traveled to Chicago, Illinois to meet with Goldstein. There, they purchased the Grapette, Orangette, and Lemonette names for $500.

Grapette’s first-year sales were quite promising. This was due to Grapette’s flavor, as well as Grapette’s unique packaging. Most soft drinks at the time were sold in twelve-ounce bottles. Grapette was sold in a six-ounce clear glass bottle, which served to show off the beverage’s purple color. With the success in sales, marketing of Grapette was expanded to much of the United States, and the slogan "Thirsty or Not" was developed for use in advertising. In addition, other flavors were developed, such as Orangette, an orange-flavored soda that used a considerable amount of real orange juice, and Lemonette, which contained a large amount of real lemon juice.

Early marketing

In the spring of 1940, Fooks began marketing his soda in Camden, Arkansas under the name "Grapette"

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When World War II began, Fooks dropped many of his other brands, such as Botl-O and Sunburst, in order to focus on Grapette. Sales of Grapette continued to soar during the war, despite restrictions and material shortages. Sugar, which was subject to wartime rationing, was obtained by adding water to granulated sugar, thus liquefying it, enabling it to be sold as syrup, which was not subject to rationing.

a12119_grapette_06In 1942, R. Paul May, an Arkansas oil tycoon, persuaded Fooks to allow him to market Grapette in Latin America, citing a lack of soft drink options in the area. May was able to build a good reputation for Grapette in Guatemala, selling not only Grapette, but also Orangette and Lemonette. These brands soon became market leaders. In 1962, the export division of Grapette was reorganized into a separate company, known as Grapette International.

In 1962, Grapette introduced a line of cola drinks to compete with Coca-Cola under the name of "Mr. Cola". The drink was popular in large part because of its sixteen-ounce bottle. Mr. Cola was also available in ten and twelve-ounce sizes. In 1963, "Lymette" was added to Grapette’s family of brands. Lymette, however, never achieved the commercial success of the other brands.

Decline and retirement

a12119_grapette_07By the 1960s, Fooks believed that he had reached his limit with Grapette, and was ready to move on. By the end of the decade, Fooks had begun talks with groups interested in purchasing Grapette. Fooks ultimately sold Grapette to the Rheingold Corporation in 1970, which marketed the Rheingold, Ruppert-Knickerbocker, and Gablinger’s lines of beers, as well as several regional brands of soft drinks in California, New Mexico, and Puerto Rico. Rheingold changed the name of the company from Grapette to Flavette, and relocated the company headquarters to Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Grapette’s bottle was changed to one with smooth sides and colored dots. The slogan became "The Juicy Soda". Grapette’s advertising model also changed. Previously, advertising was funded by a surcharge on sugar, which was to be spent by the distributor for advertising only. This plan was dropped by Rheingold, placing advertising solely in the hands of Grapette’s distributors, resulting in an immediate drop in sales. During this period, Flavette purchased the Dr. Wells soda pop brand and Mason & Mason, Inc., the makers of Mason’s Root Beer.

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In 1975, Rheingold was purchased by PepsiCo, Inc. in a hostile takeover, acquiring 80% of the company’s stock. However, the Federal Trade Commission determined that PepsiCo controlled too many soft drink companies, and thus ordered that PepsiCo divest several prominent brands. When the divestiture was complete in 1977, Grapette was in the hands of The Monarch Beverage Company, which manufactured NuGrape. As Monarch already manufactured a grape soda, it was determined that they did not need a second. Representatives from Monarch flew to Grapette’s headquarters and essentially fired the Grapette team. As such, the Grapette name was shelved, and the flavor was retired in the United States.

a12119_grapette_10Despite the brand’s retirement in the United States, May retained ownership of Grapette International, and Grapette was still produced internationally, remaining a popular drink. When May died in the early 1970s, control of Grapette International was passed on to May’s son-in-law, Brooks Rice.

In the United States, Grapette may have been gone, but it certainly had not been forgotten. Rice had made many offers to buy the American rights to Grapette back from Monarch, but regardless of the amount of money offered, Monarch refused to sell the name. Despite this setback, Rice continued to grow Grapette’s market share elsewhere in the world, with sales in the tens of millions in countries in South America and the Pacific Rim.

Wal-Mart

Rice had profited by becoming an early investor in a business called Wal-Mart, founded by Sam Walton. Over time, as Wal-Mart grew into a household name, Rice began thinking of ways to partner with Wal-Mart. In 1986, Rice was able to meet with Sam Walton, in order to discuss creating a line of private label soft drinks for Wal-Mart. He was specifically interested in making a grape soda for Wal-Mart. Walton did not waste words in telling Rice what he wanted: "I want Grapette in my stores." While Rice did not have the American rights to the Grapette name, he was able to offer Grapette’s flavor, and also promised that if he was able to reacquire the rights for the Grapette name, Wal-Mart could have it.

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Ozark Farms

In 1989, nearly three years after the initial meeting, Grapette International began producing a line of soft drinks for Wal-Mart under the Ozark Farms name. The flavors available were cola, lemon-lime, grape, and orange. Each flavor used Fooks’ original formulas. Thus Grapette had returned to American shelves, albeit under a new name. However, sales were disappointing, and the Ozark Farms line of soft drinks was discontinued.

Sam’s Choice

When Sam Walton died in 1992, Wal-Mart CEO David Glass felt it would be a fitting tribute to Walton to rename Wal-Mart’s private label as "Sam’s Choice". In 1993, Rice again began manufacturing soft drinks for Wal-Mart, this time under the Sam’s Choice brand. Wal-Mart was given exclusive rights to the flavors in the United States. Grapette was relaunched at this time as well, under the name "Sam’s Choice Grape". Sam’s Choice Grape soon became one of the best-selling grape sodas in the nation, seemingly proving Rice’s claim that the flavor was what had made Grapette so a12119_grapette_09popular, and not the drink’s famous name.

Revival of Grapette name

In 2000, Rice walked into the Wal-Mart Home Office in Bentonville, Arkansas, in order to personally deliver the news to David Glass: Monarch was finally selling the Grapette name. Rice told Glass, "This is a tribute to you and Sam for having the vision on this product."

By late 2004, the Grapette and Orangette names (and original logotypes) had been incorporated into the Sam’s Choice line of soft drinks, and had completely replaced the Sam’s Choice Grape and Sam’s Choice Orange brands in Wal-Mart stores.

Text from Wikipedia

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Now we’re drinking POMMACK

In 1919, after his best efforts to keep his brewery running Anders Lindahl moved to Stockholm, Sweden as a failed businessman, and founded Fructus Fabriker and began to make Pommac. The recipe was made by a Finland-Swedish inventor. The drink was made for the upper classes as an alcohol-free substitute for wine.

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Triple XXX History

1895

a12051_xxx_091895 saw the start of The Galveston Brewing Company at 34th and Post Office Street in Galveston, Texas. It was started by Anheuser-Busch along with some local investors.

The brewery had an estimated 10,000 barrels of its beer beverage. It was only sold locally under the name "Hi Grade." Its keg beer was packaged in steel banded barrels of oak which were marked with "XXX".

1900–1913

When a storm hit Galveston Island, business was temporarily halted. The accompanying sea surge swept over the island, and 6,000 lives were lost.

In the wake of the disaster, The Galveston Brewing Company was one of the surviving commercial establishments. Galveston would rebuild and resume brewing Hi Grade beer for the locals. When 1903 hit, the City of Galveston a12051_xxx_08constructed an elevated seawall along its beach front. The wall was built to protect the island from flooding in future hurricanes. The Galveston Brewing Company added another brand during the wall’s construction. It was called "Seawall Bond." It was created to commemorate the "invincible" new Galveston Seawall. Shortly thereafter the brewery started an ice plant which had a daily output of 100 tons of "pure crystal ice." By 1913 they constructed a bottling plant which adjoined the brewery with a capacity of 30,000 bottles a day.

Between 1900 and 1908, soft drink syrups started to be sold by The Galveston Brewing Company under the name "XXX." At the time, the company’s resident chemist developed a wide array of flavours, such as: root beer, ginger ale, strawberry, lemon-sour, lemon, orange, chocolate, cream soda, sarsaparilla, cream, grape, and apple-juice. The brand’s United States Patent Office registration statement noted that the trademark had been continuously used since at least as early as April, 1908.

1916–1918

In 1916, the State of Texas acted to prohibit alcohol in advance of the looming enactment of the 18th amendment to the U.S. Constitution. This forced the closure of many breweries in the state including The Galveston Brewing Company. The owners of Galveston Brewing Company decided to re-organize the company thus changing the name from Galveston Brewing Company to Southern Beverage Company. It would then change over its equipment to producing "XXX" soft drinks. The soft drinks were primarily ginger ale and root beer.

a12051_xxx_11In 1918, the owners of Southern Beverage Company acquired an additional trademark for its "XXX" brand of soft drinks. Reflecting on the exuberance of the day, it seems that if "XXX" was good, then "Triple XXX" had to be, as the brand’s new slogan proclaimed, "The Aristocrat of Them All"! The company would then expand its horizons. They set their sights on targeting new territories. Thus, ten "outside" salesmen were hired. Throughout the next decade Southern Beverage Company experienced huge growth of the brand’s sales volume and areas of distribution.

1923–1928

In 1923, licensed distributors of Southern Beverage Company included over 150 Triple XXX bottlers and approximately 100 Triple XXX "Thirst Stations." The locations included Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Virginia, Illinois, Indiana, Arizona, California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia.

The largest distributor of the brand outside of Texas was called A. H. Rutherford & Sons of Renton, Washington. The Rutherfords designed a unique "twin barrel" for the Triple XXX root beer restaurants. The restaurants became popular along the west coast from southern California to Washington. Triple XXX restaurants were also operated in the Vancouver, British Columbia area.

a12051_xxx_07By 1927, Southern Beverage Company decided to restructure and re-organize. Triple XXX Company was formed as the parent company and Triple XXX Bottling Company was kept as the company’s local bottling plant. The parent company now known as Triple XXX Company kept expanding the brand well outside of the Galveston territory. By 1928, they added cola flavour to their line of soft drinks. Triple XXX cola was dispensed through barrels and put up in bottles as was Triple XXX Root Beer. Although cola was gaining popularity, root beer was still considered the favourite at that time.

The "Roaring Twenties" marked some of company’s best years. By 1928, it was reported that Triple XXX Company employed 40 salesmen who covered distribution of Triple XXX soft drinks in 35 states. Even Mississippi steamers were licensed to sell Triple XXX root beer.

1932–1945

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A Seattle Triple XXX franchise in 1940

As the 1930s came along, many companies were hit hard and Triple XXX Company was one of them. Thus, it was re-organized under the original name of Galveston Beverage Company in 1932. The United States alcoholic beverage "prohibition amendment" was repealed the following year. Galveston Beverage Company would then merge with Magnolia Brewery in Houston. Shortly thereafter a new name was chosen for the company. The name chosen was Galveston-Houston Breweries, Incorporated. Thus the combined companies resumed brewing beer at both the Galveston and Houston breweries. "Southern Select" was a new brand of beer was brewed and sold at its Galveston brewery while "Magnolia" beer was brewed and sold at its Houston brewery. The brewery still however brewed Triple XXX root beer and other types of soft drink syrups and flavours for its licensed soft drink bottlers, soda fountains, and Triple XXX "Thirst Stations".

The years that followed in the "Dirty Thirties" were especially tough not only for the economy, but also on sugar rations due to the World War II years of 1941–1945. This most certainly contributed to the resulting thinned ranks of Triple XXX "Thirst Stations" and Triple XXX soft drink bottlers and distributors. As the breweries were continuing to age, an ownership change would soon take place.

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1953

By 1953, the owner of Galveston-Houston Breweries, Incorporated was ready to settle down and retire. He willfully agreed to sell the company to the accountant and his long-time friend. The new owner had plans for the Triple XXX brand and the brewery itself. The friend then incorporated another company. The company was called Stenzel Corporation with hopes of purchasing. The name company name was called Galveston-Houston Breweries, Inc..

A few years later Galveston-Houston Breweries, Inc. would sell off Galveston and Houston properties, equipment, and brand names to a larger company. The company who bought it was The Falstaff Brewing Corporation. The Falstaff Brewing Corporation would keep the Triple XXX brand while Southern Select and Magnolia production would be halted and discontinued all together.

a12051_xxx_06The soft drink portion of Triple XXX was all that was remaining of the Galveston-Houston Breweries, Inc. after the sale. Thus, the company’s name was changed yet again and this time it was changed Triple XXX Corporation and it became independent of its breweries roots as it did in the "Roaring Twenties."

Late 1950s

With the unexpected death of the new owner, the company was struggling to hang on. It didn’t help matters that in the late 1950s consumers were becoming enamored with fast food outlets. More and more Triple XXX "Thirst Stations" were disappearing. As well, licensed bottlers were also being lost through attrition.

The widow of the deceased owner created a new management team. The agreement and manager saw the move of the headquarters to the Wright Dr. Pepper Bottling Company in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. However, the corporation’s registered office remained in Houston. The new managers set about a vigorous program of calling on independent soft drink bottlers to obtain new franchisees for Triple XXX root beer.

1960s

When the 1960s came about, nobody saw the follow development occur. In 1960, United States Food and Drug Administration released a ruling that sassafras (oil of safrole) as a food and beverage ingredient was suspect as a carcinogen. Many items were no longer allowed to use it and that included root beer. Beverage companies were given a bit of time or a "grace period" to re-formulate their root beer products.

1960s

When the 1960s came about, nobody saw the follow development occur. In 1960, United States Food and Drug Administration released a ruling that sassafras (oil of safrole) as a food and beverage ingredient was suspect as a carcinogen. Many items were no longer allowed to use it and that included root beer. Beverage companies were given a bit of time or a "grace period" to re-formulate their root beer products.

Triple XXX sought the help of an independent flavour laboratory in New Orleans. With the help of the laboratory, Triple XXX was able to retain its distinct flavour. But then came the problem of the foamy head characteristics of the root beer. To many it was irreplaceable. Sometime later, the chemist would search and find alternative ingredients that were close enough to produce the appearance of "draft style" root beer. And most important for fans of Triple XXX root beer, its distinctive creamy root beer taste was preserved.

In 1962, the management group of Triple XXX Corporation was reporting progress. The claim was that 27 soft drink bottlers and fountain syrup distributors were a part of the franchise. But the number of bottlers were down, though reasons were not known. By the late 1960s, concerned Dr.Pepper bottlers who were also longtime franchisees for Triple XXX root beer proposed to the owner of Triple XXX Corporation that new ownership and management was needed in order to preserve the brand.

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In 1968, when today’s Gilman Boulevard was still Highway 10, the primary route from Seattle to eastern Washington over Snoqualmie Pass. In that year, Jay Noel built the present Triple XXX on that route for its first owners, Dick Gilbert and John Wirtz.

1969–1978

In 1969, the company’s headquarters were relocated to Orange, Texas after controlling shares of the Triple XXX Corporation were bought by the Dr Pepper Bottling Company of Orange, Texas. After the purchase of the company, the new owner wanted preserve the production and distribution of Triple XXX root beer and flavours for its bottlers and fountain supply distributors.

At the time Triple XXX was still highly regarded as old time root beer. Also during that time, the development in the market was limited in many ways. It was limited to serving its existing bottlers and distributors. The Dr Pepper Bottling Company of Orange, Texas sold their Dr Pepper business to Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Beaumont. But with the sale of Dr Pepper, Triple XXX was not included. Now with the owner wanting to retire, he decided to pass the legacy onto a new owner. By this time the Triple XXX franchise roster had shrunk to 5 bottlers and 2 fountain drink distributors.

1978–1979

In 1978 another company bought the Triple XXX Corporation. The Lydick Corporation, Houston, Texas bought all related "Triple XXX" assets. This purchase included namely the registered trademarks, formulas, and franchises from the Triple XXX Corporation in Orange. After the sale of the Triple XXX Corporation (Galveston, Houston, and Orange), the company surrendered its corporate charter and name. The Lydick Corporation changed its name to Triple XXX Corporation, Houston, Texas.

a12051_xxx_10With the new owners of the Triple XXX Corporation in place, it started an aggressive marketing campaign, franchising exclusive territorial distribution rights to the brand to a number of south western Coca-Cola and Dr Pepper/Seven-Up bottlers. Also updated was the packaging and advertising material. The new logo featured the Triple XXX root beer logo in red and yellow over a rich chocolate brown background, with red and yellow bands to highlight the top and bottom of the label. Using the sugary brand’s appeal of the past, the phrase "Tastes like root beer used to taste" was added to all packaging and promotional materials. The new logo design and slogan were unveiled at the 1979 National Soft Drink Association Exposition in Dallas.

Also during this time new promotional materials targeted at the consumer were developed. The three colour theme was carried out for merchandising items such as posters, banners, shelf talkers, bottle neck ringers, and table display cards. The company also produced television and radio spots that aired in select markets. Promotional activities varied from market to market, and included dispensing free samples in chain stores, special feature pricing for holidays and weekend promotion periods, as well as distributing price-off coupons in local stores and newspapers. The distributors of the brand started selling root beer from special events tents and trailers at local events in their markets.

After this hard marketing campaign, the results were promising. Present bottlers were retained and a new group of Coca-Cola and Dr Pepper bottlers were franchised. The number of franchises grew to 25 bottlers and syrup a12051_xxx_05distributors. Geographically, the brand’s packaged drink and fountain drink availability expanded into seven Central and Southwestern states.

1980–1985

In 1980, the soft drink industry changed dramatically. Faced with generation turnovers and potentially large investments to upgrade production equipment, longtime family-owned bottlers began merging or closing. Soft drink flavours were revised after these businesses combined. This development resulted in about 20 root beer brands competing for distribution through a declining number of soft drink bottling companies.

The consolidation trend accelerated through the 1980s and into the 1990s. The Triple XXX company recognized during the mid-1980s that there were not enough independent bottlers available to package the brand’s root beer and ship it off directly to stores. By 1985, canning and bottling was halted, although fountain drink distribution continued through soda fountains and restaurants.

1990s

Throughout the past decade, the number of independently owned soft drink bottlers declined through mergers and acquisitions. The decline was so bad that nearly all distribution territories in the United States were served by only three major brand soft drink bottlers, Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola and Dr Pepper/7-Up. Also, each cola company’s parent franchise company developed or distributed their own root beer and the franchisees were only allowed to distribute that brand in their territories. That left the remaining independent root beer brands searching for viable alternate routes to market, quite a challenge.

2000s

"Triple XXX" is featured in the Dr Pepper Museum and Free Enterprise Institute in Waco, Texas as a historic Texas soft drink brand. The brand’s limited availability continues to generate frequent consumer inquiries and requests. Triple XXX root beer in 12 ounce glass bottles is sold online through its website, which has a link to its distributors. Only two Triple XXX root beer restaurants still exist, in West Lafayette, Indiana and Issaquah, Washington. The formula for the root beer and the trademark are currently owned by the Triple XXX Root Beer Corp., West Lafayette, IN.

In context

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 West Lafayette, Indiana restaurant, one of two remaining

The West Lafayette, Indiana Triple XXX store was opened in 1929 by Bert Wright and continues to operate as one of the only two Triple XXX restaurants in existence today. It also holds the distinction of being the first and oldest drive-in restaurant in Indiana. In its long history, the restaurant has had many owners, including Tom Comingore, Norm Karner, and even an investor group including Russell Tarter. Jack Ehresman, a longtime diner, was working as a dishwasher when he started asking the then-owner if he could purchase it, and eventually became the owner, along with his wife, Ruth Ehresman. Currently, it is owned by Greg and Carrie Ehresman, who took ownership of the establishment from Greg’s parents, Jack and Ruth.

There have been structural changes over the years as well. A second story was added in 1986–1987 along with a new roof, and seating has been increased to meet demand. However, The Ehresmans are quick to point out that the atmosphere remains the same, citing an iconic 35 year old Coca-Cola sign proudly displayed in the diner.

The restaurant was featured on the Food Network program Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives during an episode which aired on August 4, 2007. More recently, the restaurant was featured in a May 2009 Businessweek article showcasing America’s longest-running restaurants.

Text from Wikipedia

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Donald Duck soft drinks were the first sodas to be produced by General Beverages, Inc. of Chattanooga, Tennessee. They were licensed by the Double a12034_donald duck soda2Cola Company to produce the Donald Duck line. These fruit flavoured sodas were introduced in the 1940s and included flavours such as Lemon Lime, Grape, Orange, Strawberry, Black Cherry, Root Beer, Cola and Ginger Ale. Donald Duck Soda was released in both bottles and cone-top cans, and later, punch-tab cans. The brand was discontinued in the late 1950s

Text from RetroPlanet


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I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

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Sidral Mundet is a Mexican apple-flavored carbonated soft drink produced by FEMSA S.A de C.V and distributed in the United States by the Novamex company, which also distributes the Jarritos and Sangria Señorial soda brands.

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History

Sidral Mundet was first bottled in 1902 by Don Arturo Mundet, who produced the cider-flavored beverage. Basing Sidral Mundet on the "limonada" or "gaseosa" drinks that were popular in Mexico at the turn of the 20th Century, he utilized the pasteurization technique to keep the drink sterile in the bottling process. The drink has been renowned in Mexico for its nourishing and hydrating abilities and has sometimes been used as a home remedy for stomach aches.

In 1988, Sidral Mundet was introduced to the US through Novamex and has since become a popular soft drink in the Hispanic American market.

Varieties

Sidral Mundet is available in three flavors: red apple, green apple and yellow apple.

Text from Wikipedia 

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I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

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Delaware Punch is a fruit-flavoured soft drink. Its formula uses a blend of fruit flavours, with grape being the most prominent. It is not carbonated and caffeine-free.

a1084_delaware punch_01Delaware Punch was created by Thomas E. Lyons in 1913. The brand is currently owned by The Coca-Cola Company.

The beverage is difficult to find, but is still sold in some grocery stores in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas, and some restaurants in Houston. Delaware Punch can also be found for sale on eBay. Delaware Punch concentrate can be purchased from several online soft drink retailers. The bottled form is sold in Guatemala and Mexico, but is currently banned in much of the United States due to a colouring agent, allura red, used. Delaware Punch was commonly sold at the New Orleans drug store chain K&B, before it was bought by Rite Aid in 1997.

Delaware Punch is named for the Delaware grape cultivar from which its flavour is derived. The grape was first grown in Delaware County, Ohio, and the drink therefore has no affiliation with the state of Delaware.

Text from Wikipedia 

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I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

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Bermuda loves Barritt’s Bermuda Stone Ginger Beer, a zesty ginger soft drink, that has been bottled continuously since 1874.

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Barritt’s Ginger beer is distributed in Bermuda by John Barritt & Son Ltd. a family owned and operated soft drink firm that has been going for 5 generations.

While Barritt’s Ginger Beer can be enjoyed alone it is a versatile mixer adding spice to rum, vodka, beer or exotic liqueurs. Barritt’s Ginger Beer also features in a number of island recipes for cakes, jams marmalades, sauces and festive fruit punch.

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Barritt’s Ginger Beer is available island wide in 12oz cans and 20oz, 1 litre and 2 litre bottles. It is also available in convenient 12 or 24 can travel packs, and try Barritt’s Diet Ginger Beer for that great ginger flavour with zero calories.

History of Ginger Beer

a1078_barrits_01Ginger Beer originated in England from its predecessors Mead & Metheglin. Metheglin was a naturally carbonated, yeast-fermented honey beverage, which often included spices such as ginger, cloves and mace.

Originally Ginger Beer also included special yeast for fermentation and was sweetened with honey, molasses or sugar cane. After brewing the Ginger Beer was poured into stone bottles then corked to maintain the natural effervescence.

Up through the mid-1800’s many Ginger Beers contained a significant amount of alcohol (about 11%). Limitations in England in 1855 required that non-excisable beverages contain less than 2% alcohol, which led bottlers of Ginger Beer to dilute their brewed concentrate with carbonated water.

History Barritt’s Bermuda Stone Ginger Beer

a1078_barrits_05William John Barritt came to Bermuda from England in 1839 to work in law enforcement. He eventually became Head Jailer at the old Hamilton Jail. He left the Prison Service when his request for a pay increase to support his wife and 12 children was denied.

In 1874 W.J. opened a dry goods shop on the corner of Front & King Streets in Hamilton, with a small mineral water bottling machine in the back room. This is where Barritt’s Ginger Beer started.

W.J. Barritt died the same year he started the firm and his son John Barritt took over. The business has remained in the family ever since, becoming John Barritt & Son when Frederick G. Barritt joined the firm in 1903. Fred’s sons Leon and Bobby joined the firm in 1923 and 1950 respectively and today the fifth generation of the Barritt family, Bruce and Fred, continue the proud Heritage of selling Bermuda’s Best Beverages, including Barritt’s Bermuda Stone Ginger Beer.

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Text from BarrittsGingerBeer


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I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

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999_campa cola_01Campa Cola is a soft drink brand in India. It was a market leader in most regions of India for a period spanning several years until the advent of the foreign players Pepsi and Coca-Cola after the liberalisation policy of the P. V. Narasimha Rao Government in 1991.

Campa Cola was a drink created by the Pure Drinks Group in the 1970s. The Pure Drinks Group pioneered the India soft drink industry when it introduced Coca-Cola into India in 1949, and were the sole manufacturers and distributors of Coca-Cola till the 1970s when Coke was asked to leave. The Pure Drinks Group and Campa Beverages Pvt. Ltd. virtually dominated the entire Indian soft drink industry for about 15 years, and then started Campa Cola during the absence of foreign competition.

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I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

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Kofola is a Czechoslovakian carbonated soft drink produced in Czech Republic and Slovakia. It is the principal rival of Coca-Cola and Pepsi in these two markets.

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History

Kofola originated in the Czechoslovak pharmaceutical company Galena, n.p. (located in Opava, now Czech Republic) in 1959 during research targeted at finding a possible use for surplus caffeine produced in the process of coffee roasting. The resulting dark-coloured, sweet-and-sour syrup Kofo became the a1005_kofola_10main ingredient of a new soft drink named Kofola introduced in 1960. During the 1960s and 1970s Kofola became exceedingly popular in communist Czechoslovakia because it substituted for Western cola-based drinks like Coca-Cola or Pepsi, which were not generally available.

After the fall of the Communist regime in 1989, Kofola had to compete with many foreign brands that entered the attractive newly opened market. After a period of decline and trademark lawsuits (many companies produced their own similarly tasting "kofola" because the term became a genericized trademark), in 2000 the Santa nápoje company, based in Krnovand owned by the Greek-immigrant Samaras family, became the only producer and distributor of Kofola in Czech Republic and Slovakia. Other producers of similar drinks had to rename their products (most notable are Hejkola and Šofokola).

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In 2002, the company built a new factory in Rajecká Lesná, Slovakia, to satisfy the demand of the Slovak market. In 2003, Santa nápoje changed its name to Kofola, a.s.. Apart from Kofola it also produces other soft drinks (Top Topic, Jupí, Jupík, RC Cola and Vinea from 2008) that are exported to Poland, Hungary, Slovakia and Croatia. The company’s intention is to build a factory in Poland as well.

Since 1998 Kofola has been bottled (in addition to classical 0.33-litre glass bottles) in 0.5-litre and 2-litre plastic-bottles. 0.25-litre cans were introduced in 2003, 1-litre plastic-bottles in December 2004. Kofola draught from 50-litre kegs, traditionally sold in many bars and restaurants across the two countries, is very popular as well.

Since 2002 the producer has launched a successful media campaign aimed at a young and hip audience based on the slogan "Když ji miluješ, není co řešit. / Keď ju miluješ, nie je čo riešiť." ("If you love her there is nothing to question.") Until 2000, the Kofola logo featured a coffee bean. It now resembles a coffee flower.

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In 2008 Kofola announced a merger with the Polish lemonade producer Hoop.

The merged company was renamed into Kofola-Hoop S.A. In autumn 2008, the Polish Private Equity fund Enterprise Investors acquired in a Public Tender Offer 42.46% of Kofola-Hoop for approximately € 140 million.

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Sales

In Slovakia, Kofola is the most formidable rival of both Coca-Cola and Pepsi. In 2003, 14.28 million litres of Kofola were sold on the Slovak market; in 2004, Kofola sales reached 19.44 million litres. According to a 2004 survey, 17% of Slovak cola-based soft drink consumers buy Kofola most frequently, compared to 14% preferring Coca-Cola. Kofola’s market share has doubled in the period of the last three years (4.6% in 2002, 9.4% in 2004). Kofola thus occupies third position in the Slovak market, after Coca-Cola (11.5% in 2004) and Walmark (9.6%), preceding Pepsi (5.5% in 2004).

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Ingredients

Kofo syrup, the main ingredient of Kofola, consists of 14 natural ingredients (such as extracts from apple, cherry, currant, or herbal aroma),sugar, and caramel. In comparison with Pepsi or Coca-Cola it contains 30% less sugar, a a1005_kofola_13little more caffeine (15 mg/100ml, Coca-Cola 9.6 mg/100ml) and it does not contain phosphoric acid.

In 2004, Kofola Citrus was introduced into the market which was Kofola with a hint of lemon. It proved to be a popular alternative to the original flavour.

‘neKofola/joKofola’ was introduced at the end of 2007 as a Christmas limited edition. This had a hint of cinnamon, and was only available around the Christmas period

To compete with coca-cola zero, a sugar-free Kofola BEZ cukru alternative was introduced. This allowed Kofola to compete with coca-cola on all levels.

After the success of their limited cinnamon edition, a new cherry-flavoured Kofola Barborková was introduced for a couple of months in 2008.

In Kofola Extra Herbal, a new variety of the drink the original recipe of Kofola Original was extended with dandelion, gentian and peppermint.

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Kofola Festival, introduced in 2013, contains guava.

Cocktails

The most popular cocktail with kofola is a highball made of kofola, lemon juice and Czech Tuzemak (domestic rum) called Kofrum, Student lemonade, Rebel or Chequia Libre. Kofola with pilsner lager beer is called Kofola ‘n’ Beer or Diesel.

Text from Wikipedia


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a1000_cavan colaCavan Cola was a brand of soft drink produced by Cavan Mineral Water Ltd. in the town of Cavan, Ireland. It was introduced in 1958, and was sold in 250ml bottles in shops in counties Cavan, Monaghan, Sligo, Leitrim, Louth and Meath. The product proved so popular there that it went national in the early 1990s. In 1995, the still family-run Cavan Mineral Water Ltd. was taken over by Finches, who began phasing out both Cavan Cola and its sister product, an alcopop called Mug-Shot. By 2001, Cavan Cola had disappeared from most shops, even in County Cavan.In recent times, the parent group has been the subject of a number of rival bids.The Crawley Mug Groups bid for Cavan Mineral Water was $78.50 per share in cash, which topped the $74.50 cash and stock deal offered by the Quinn Group.

Product

Cavan Cola was sold in small 250ml bottles, with a distinctive green "book" label. The taste was described as being slightly sweeter than Coca-Cola, with a slightly liquorice flavour. It was popular in Cavan, and at the peak of its popularity (late 1980s/early 1990s), the product often outsold global brands (like Coke and Pepsi) in shops in County Cavan and County Leitrim and the surrounding area.

Revival Attempts

Cavan Cola was finally withdrawn in 2001. It has been the subject of several campaigns to revive it, but the new parent company of Cavan Mineral Water has thus far refused to bring it back. For a short time in the late 1990s, Cavan Cola was produced in Dublin.

Text from Wikipedia 

Poor Cavan cola can’t have many fans out there, the image above was the only one I could find and even that one needed a round in PhotoShop for a fresh-up – Ted


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Maaza
(Hindi: माज़ा, Bengali: মাজ়া) is a Coca-Cola fruit drink brand marketed in Middle East, Africa, Eastern Europe and Asia, the most popular drink being the mango variety, so much that over the years, the Maaza brand has become a104651_maaza_01synonymous with Mango. Initially Coca-Cola had also launched Maaza in orange and pineapple variants, but these variants were subsequently dropped. Coca-Cola has recently re-launched these variants again in the Indian market.

Mango drinks currently account for 90% of the fruit juice market in India. Maaza currently dominates the fruit drink category and competes with Pepsi’s Slice brand of mango drink and Frooti, manufactured by Parle Agro.

a104651_maaza_06While Frooti was sold in small cartons, Maaza and Slice were initially sold in returnable bottles. However, all brands are also now available in small cartons and large PET bottles. Of late, the Indian market is witnessing the entry of a large number of small manufacturers producing only mango fruit drink.

Maaza has a distinct pulpy taste as compared to Frooti and tastes slightly sweeter than Slice. Maaza claims to contain mango pulp of the Alphonso variety, which is known as the "King of Mangoes" in India.

History

The Union Beverages Factory, based in the UAE, began selling Maaza as a franchisee in the Middle East and Africa in 1976. By 1995, it had acquired rights to the Maaza brand in these countries through Maaza International Co LLC Dubai. Maaza was launched in 1976 in India. and in India, Maaza was acquired by Coca-Cola India in 1993 from Parle-Bisleri along a104651_maaza_07with other brands such as Limca, Citra, Thums Up and Gold Spot. Maaza was acquired by House of Spices in 2005 for the North American market. Finally in the year 2006 Infra Foodbrands acquired Maaza for the European, Caribbean and West-African market and cooperates with House of Spices for the North American market.

Infra Foodbrands

Since 1998 Infra Foodbrands, located in The Netherlands, has started distribution in Europe, West-Africa, North America, Canada and the Caribbean, using frequent worldwide connections from Rotterdam Main Port. Since 2006 Infra Foodbrands is the owner of the Maaza brand and exports to 33 countries (and expanding) worldwide.

a104651_maaza_05Infra Foodbrands develops, designs, distributes and markets a range of beverages, all supported by marketing- and promotional support programmes. Until the appointment of Infra Foodbrands BV, as its European franchise, Maaza was a one-product brand (Maaza Mango) with limited appeal to ethnic consumers in geographical pockets. Since then Infra Foodbrands has turned Maaza into a recognised beverage brand, offering Maaza in 10 different flavours (f.e. Mango, Tropical, Guava, Lychee, Passion Fruit/Maracuja, Pineapple, Banana, Papaya, Fruit Punch and Guanabana) in 9 different packaging formats (f.e. PET bottles, cartons, glass bottles and cans) suitable for all segments of the market. The Maaza drinks are distributed to supermarkets, convenience stores, hotels, cafes and many other outlets.

Text from Wikipedia 


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a1001_pacola_04Pakola is one of the oldest carbonated soft drinks to have been introduced in Pakistan. It dates way back to the year 1950 by one Muhammad Ali. As a matter of fact, the name Pakola is from the words Pakistan Cola. As of today, Pakola is produced by Gul Brothers Co and Mehran Bottlers, both of Pakistan. It is green in colour with a number of variants available.

The drink is so popular that it is also exported abroad to Europe and other regions. Pakola is majorly popular due to its unique ice cream like very strong taste. As a brands name, Pakola is officially owned by the Teli family.

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a10453_asinaAsina was an orange soda produced by the small soda plants in Norway.

History
Asina was launched in 1948 as a joint orange soda for members of the Soda Factory Association, meant as a competitor to Solo, also an orange soda, Norway’s most popular soda at that time. The Asina name derives from a name competition the Soda Factory Association announced in 1947 Asina came out on top, with Sinai and Orango respectively on second and third.

The Asina Association was founded in 1961 – an association that would manage the bottling rights and ensure that the product at any time held top a10453_asina2quality. Norway was divided into sales territory, and Asina became a known product all over the country.

After all the small soda factories have closed down, it is in 2014 only the Roma soda factory in Lillestrøm and Berentsens Brygghus who produce Asina.

Text (translated) from Wikipedia 

I can remember when Norway was divided into sales territory. In the era where I have my week end cottage there was a period when the only sodas you could get locally was Asina and Ginger Ale from Roma in Lillestrøm. Luckily, Asina was and still is an excellent soda – Ted


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In 1587, an expedition organized by Sir Walter Raleigh established an English colony of 117 people on the island of Roanoke, off the coast of present-day North Carolina. On August 18th of that year, and just fifteen days after the colonists had arrived, the first English child was born on American soil.

The child’s mother was Governor John White’s daughter, Eleanor, and her father, Ananias Dare, served as one of the Governor’s assistants. Her baptism on the Sunday following her birth  was the second recorded Christian sacrament administered in North America. The first baptism had been administered a few days earlier to Manteo, an Indian chief who was rewarded for his service by being christened and named “Lord”.

Before long, Governor White was forced to leave for England to secure much-needed supplies. Virginia was less than one year old and little did he know that he would never see her, or any of the other colonists who remained behind, again.

a1033_virginia dare_06When he arrived in England, he found the country to be at war, threatened by the Spanish Armada. In need of his expertise, Queen Elizabeth extended his stay and it was not until 1590, three years to the month later, that he was again able to set sail for Roanoke with supplies for the little colony.

When he arrived in 1591, he found that the settlement had vanished… and it came to be known in history as Sir Walter Raleigh’s “Lost Colony.”

A secret code had been worked out that should the colony have to leave Roanoke Island for any reason, they were to carve their new location on a tree. If the move was due to an attack, they were to carve over the letters, or name, with the form of a Maltese cross as a distress signal. Instead of the expected sign of distress, he returned to find the word “Croatoan” carved on the tree. To this day, no one is certain where the lost colony went, or what happened to them.

a1033_virginia dare_07Many tall tales have evolved from the misty curtain drawn about the Lost Colony. Virginia Dare is the subject of many variations. According to the legend, there was an attack by hostile Indians on the Roanoke colonists. Chief Manteo, returning from a fishing expedition, saw the raid in progress. By using a secret tunnel, he was able to lead all the inhabitants safely to nearby canoes. An all-night trip down the Pamlico brought the group to Manteo’s village at Hatteras. There, the colonists were accepted into the tribe as brothers and sisters.

The fair, blond Virginia Dare was from the beginning a wonder to the Indians. As she grew in stature and years, many braves paid court for her hand in marriage. The fair girl loved all the people, both Indians and white, but was not yet ready to choose a mate.

a1033_virginia dare_05Chico, the tribal medicine man, was one who was greatly smitten by the maiden’s charms. Though Virginia was kind to him, it was clear that Chico’s ardor was not being returned. Finally, in a fit of passion, Chico vowed that if she would not marry him, she would have no man. Calling upon the power of the sea nymphs, Chico lured Virginia to Roanoke Island. Stepping ashore, she assumed the form of a snow-white deer.

Soon, it was whispered that a white doe was the leader of all the deer of Roanoke Island. Wherever the remarkable creature went, all others followed. Many great hunters tried to slay the mystical creature, but no arrow seemed to find a mark. As time went by, the white doe became a legend as well as a great challenge.

Finally, a great hunt was organized, and all the young braves of noble blood vowed their efforts. Many prizes and honors were to be awarded the victor. Young Wanchese, son of Chief Wanchese, who had traveled to England, had in his possession a silver-tipped arrow presented by Queen Elizabeth to his father. He believed it had magical powers and would bring him the quarry he sought.

a1033_virginia dare_01As fate would have it, Wanchese did indeed sight the snow-white doe and, taking careful aim, loosed his deadly missile. The silver tip succeeded where all others had failed, and the deer fell to the ground. The young brave rushed forward to claim his prize, but all joy fled and was replaced by dismay as he heard the deer whisper with her last breath, faint but clear, “Virginia Dare”.

The name Virginia Dare came to symbolize wholesomeness and purity, and when Garrett & Company was founded in the region in 1835, the name was adopted as a brand for its wine, produced from the native Scuppernong grape.

With the institution of Prohibition in 1919, Garrett & Company was required to reduce the alcohol content of its wine. It was then that they decided to utilize their uncommonly fine alcohol in the manufacture of flavoring extracts of the best possible quality.

Dr. Bernard H. Smith, a noted flavor chemist, was charged with establishing this line of flavors that would carry the name Virginia Dare. With time, the company’s flavoring extract business flourished, and in 1923 the Virginia Dare Extract Company was incorporated.

a1033_virginia dare_03In 1923, Bernard H. Smith started an independent enterprise in Brooklyn, New York, manufacturing flavors for industry and home use. Smith ran this company until his death in 1952, when Lloyd E. Smith took over as head of the company with factory, offices and laboratory facilities in Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY. It was Lloyd who decided to broaden the scope of the Virginia Dare Company.

The first flavor developed seventy-eight years ago was Virginia Dare Vanilla. The company added, flavor by flavor, a reputation for exceptional quality and excellent service.

Virginia Dare’s first major effort in the fast growing franchised bottlers field was a product known as “Korker”, which became a successful clear lemon-lime product and was followed by a full line  of Virginia Dare bottled flavors, some of which carried interesting names such as “South Seas” or “Vin-Vie”.

Pictured  is a 7oz green ACL Korker bottle “Bottled under the auth VIrginia Dare Extract Co, Brooklyn NY” by the Pepsi Cola Bottling Co in Fayetteville NC. It claims it is “A Corking Good Drink”.

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The name Virginia Dare now includes a wide assortment of vanilla, tea, coffee and cocoa concentrates as well as its fruit, nut, sweet, dairy, chocolate, herbal, spice and tropical flavors. Still located in Brooklyn, on Third Avenue, they also manufacture a line of masking agents for use in fortified smoothies, beverages and yogurt.

The quality of Virginia Dare products is as consistent as when it first started producing wine in 1835. And the same spirit of adventure and discovery that led development of a thriving business remains.

If you look in the right places, there are many vintage collectibles of this legendary flavor around today, although comments are that it is not popular among collectors. The Virginia Dare items in my personal collection are among my favorites, as much for the interesting history behind its name as anything else.

Text from SodaTraderz


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The sharpest among you may have noticed that at the bottom of the “This Week’s Soft drink” posts there is encouragement for my visitors to share memories connected to soft drinks posted. I must admit that this rarely happens so when it does, and with such well written and interesting memories as it did to day I didn’t have the heart to just post it at the comment page which I suspect very few read. So here is Katrin-Ingrid at Art-coloured Glasses’ comments on Green River – Ted

a1030_green river_01As far as I can tell, Green River is now distributed nationwide, in groceries and sweet shops across the US, again, and it tastes pretty much as I remember it from the 1960s. My first memories of Green River were not of a bottled pop, but of a true soda-fountain phosphate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphate_soda) that was hand-mixed and served by the soda jerks. It tasted pretty much like the bottled stuff but had the extra allure of the handmade alchemy practiced at the fountain, so that was a special treat when I was a kid. There is a wonderful, a1030_green river_02popular ice cream parlour where I live in Denton, Texas, that makes a wide variety of fantastic homemade ice cream flavours and other soda fountain classics; though one can order a Green River phosphate there, I suspect that nowadays it’s merely a combination of Green River syrup and plain sparkling water, not much different from the so-called Italian Sodas sold practically everywhere in the US but still slightly nostalgic to me because of the mere Green River name.

The name also carries a less savoury memory for me, a1030_green river_06as I grew up in Washington state, in the area where an actual Green River (though more brown and muddy most of the time, in practice if not in name) became the notorious dumping-ground for the prolific serial killer Gary Ridgway, who is still better known as the Green River Killer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Ridgway). I don’t know what, if any, effect that horrible case and the publicity surrounding it ever had on the company producing what was a completely unrelated and sugary-sweet soda pop, but I imagine there are others like me who lived there at the time and found a1030_green river_05the name a bit unsettling for a while. It’s long enough ago that the sensationalism of the crime and reportage are far beyond the reach of any young people, the target audience of consumers who have done as much as we nostalgic “oldsters” have done to create the contemporary craze for ‘retro’ sodas that has helped the good old lime pop revisit its glory days.

Bottoms up!
Kathryn

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a1004_nehi_03Nehi /ˈnh/ (pronounced "knee high") is a flavored soft drink that originated in America. It was introduced in 1924 by Chero-Cola/Union Bottle Works. The "Nehi Corporation" name was adopted in 1928 after the Nehi fruit-flavored sodas became popular. In 1955, the company changed its name to Royal Crown Company, after its RC Cola brand. It was founded by Claude Hatcher, a Georgia grocer, who began bottling ginger ale and root beer in 1905. As of the middle of April 2008, Nehi had become a brand of Dr Pepper Snapple Group.

History

The Chero-Cola company added Nehi Cola to its line of sodas in 1924 in order to offer a broader variety of flavors. It originally offered orange, grape, root beer, peach, and other flavors of soda. Nehi was instantly successful and outsold Chero-Cola entirely. The company changed its a1004_nehi_05name to Nehi Corporation in 1928 and was listed on the New York Curb Exchange. Business went well until 1930 when a major crisis occurred. Reflecting the Great Depression, which followed with the stock market crash of October 1929, Nehi Corporation’s sales figures dropped one million dollars in 1930 from a high of $3.7 million in the previous year. Sales continued to decline until 1932, the only year in which the company had ever lost money.

By 1933, the low point had been passed, and the business was just beginning to stabilize when another tragedy struck. Claud A. Hatcher, the company’s president and guiding light from its formation, died suddenly December 31, 1933. Hatcher was soon replaced by H. R. Mott, vice president of the Nehi Corporation for several years beforehand, and who had been associated with the company since 1920. As new president, he was greeted with a great amount of debt. His all-consuming ambition, however, was to make the company debt-free as quickly as possible and to keep it that way. He updated operations, obtained extensions of credit, and cut expenses. Within a year, the Nehi Corporation was debt-free and ready to move ahead once more.

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In the early 20th century, the advertising logo of Nehi was a picture of a seated woman’s legs, in which the skirt was high enough to show the stockings up to the knee, suggesting the phrase "knee-high," to illustrate the correct pronunciation of the company name. This was referenced in Jean Shepherd’s story "My Old Man and the Lascivious Special Award That Heralded the Birth of Pop Art" in the book In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash, as well as in the film A Christmas Story, which was adapted from the book.

a1004_nehi_02Robert Ripley helped the Nehi Corporation, when he advertised for them on his radio show "Ripley’s Believe It or Not!" By 1940, Nehi products were available in forty-seven of a1004_nehi_09the forty-eight states. In 1946, the pace for the Corporation accelerated tremendously. The company began to enhance its advertising by using celebrities. Bing Crosby, Joan Crawford (before joining the Pepsi Cola Company board of directors), Bob Hope, and many others joined in selling the products of Nehi Corporation. When World War II was over, the company and its bottlers joined whole-heartedly in a progressive program of expansion and improvement that made 1947 one of the great years in the history of the enterprise. In that year, glamorous Hedy Lamarr was pictured in point of purchase advertising signs. At that time, Nehi Corporation offered more than ten flavors. Those a1004_nehi_06included Dr. Nehi, Nehi Chocolate, Nehi Root Beer, Nehi Lemonade, Nehi Wild Red, Nehi Blue Cream, and its more classic flavors Nehi Orange, Nehi Grape, and Nehi Peach. Many of these flavors were later dropped as their novelty and popularity waned.

Later, the Nehi Corporation reformulated Chero-Cola, naming it RC Cola. "RC" Cola sold so well that the company changed its name to Royal Crown Cola Co. Internationally, Royal Crown rebranded the Nehi flavors as RCQ.

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493_barrs_01The company was founded in 1875 by Robert Barr in the town of Falkirk. In 1887 his son, Robert Fulton Barr, set up a division of the original company in Glasgow, which had a much larger population. Then in 1892 the Glasgow branch passed to Andrew Grieg Barr, a brother of the founder of that branch. Irn-Bru was first launched in 1901. The Falkirk and Glasgow divisions merged in 1959. The Company was first listed on the London Stock Exchange in 1965.

493_barrs_02In 1972, the Tizer brand was purchased. The year 1980 saw the introduction of Low Calorie Irn-Bru: this changed its name in 1991 to Diet Irn-Bru, and then in 2010 to Irn-Bru sugar free. In 2001 the company acquired Findlays Mineral Water which is sourced in the Lammermuir Hills.

In 2002 Roger White joined A. G. Barr as managing director and in 2004 became Barr’s first ever non-family chief executive.

493_barrs_04The Company acquired Forfar based Strathmore Mineral Water in May 2006.[6] The Irn-Bru 32 energy drink variant was launched in 2006. In 2008 the company purchased the Taut sports drink range.

On 14 November 2012 the Company agreed to merge with Britvic, which produces drinks like J2O, Tango and Robinsons, as well as holding the authority to produce Pepsi for the UK market, to create one of Europe’s largest soft drinks companies.

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