Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Vintage Science’ Category

a121304_fyr_00a121304_fyr_01a121304_fyr_02a121304_fyr_03

Rubjerg Knude Lighthouse looks unreal. It is located on the coast of the North Sea in Rubjerg, Hjørring Municipality, Denmark. Construction began in 1899 and it was first lit on December 27, 1900.

In August of 1968 the lighthouse ceased operating but remained open as a coffee shop and museum. In 2002 it was all abandoned because of the intensely shifting sands. By 2009 the buildings were removed because of the damage caused by the pressure of the sand. It is believed that the tower will fall into the sea by 2023.

Check it out on Google Maps or Earth with these coordinates 57°26’56.02”N 9°46’27.66”E. I couldn’t see it well with Google Maps, but I know it’s there because you can plainly see it’s shadow across the sand!

Images and text found on ThingsIHappenToLike

Read Full Post »

a121298_wheel

The Great Laxey Wheel, Isle of Wight

The Laxey Wheel (also known as Lady Isabella) is the world’s largest working waterwheel, built in 1854 to pump water from the mine shafts, and now run as a tourist attraction.

Image and text from Lemon Tea & Earwig Biscuits

Read Full Post »

a12105_Dynasphere

The Dynasphere (sometimes misspelled Dynosphere) was a monowheel vehicle design patented in 1930 by J. A. (John Archibald) Purves (7 August 1870 – 4 November 1952) from Taunton, Somerset, UK. Purves’ idea for the vehicle was inspired by a sketch made by Leonardo da Vinci.

Detail

Two prototypes were initially built: a smaller electrical model, and one with a gasoline motor that attained either 2.5 or 6 horse power depending on the source consulted, using a two-cylinder air-cooled Douglas engine with a three speedgear box, also providing reverse. The Dynasphere model reached top speeds of 25–30 miles per hour (40–48 km/h). The gasoline-powered prototype was 10-foot (3.0 m) high and built of iron latticework that weighed 1,000 pounds (450 kg). The next generation version had ten outer hoops, covered with a leather lining, shaped to present a small profile to the ground.

a12105_Dynasphere2

The driver’s seat and the motor were part of one unit, mounted with wheels upon the interior rails of the outer hoop. The singular driving seat and motor unit, when powered forward, would thus try to "climb" up the spherical rails, which would cause the lattice cage to roll forward. Steering of the prototype was crude, requiring the driver to lean in the direction sought to travel, though Purves envisioned future models equipped with gears that would shift the inner housing without leaning, thus tipping the Dynasphere in the direction of travel. The later ten-hoop model had a steering wheel engaging such tipping gears, and was captured in a 1932 Pathé newsreel, in which the vehicle’s advantages are first described and then demonstrated at the Brooklands motor racing circuit. A novelty model was later constructed by Purves that could seat eight passengers, the "Dynasphere 8", made specifically for beach use.

a12105_Dynasphere3

Purves was optimistic about his invention’s prospects. As reported in a 1932 Popular Science magazine article, after a filmed test drive in 1932 on a beach in Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, he stated that the Dynasphere "reduced locomotion to the simplest possible form, with consequent economy of power", and that it was "the high-speed vehicle of the future". An article in the February 1935 issue of Meccano Magazine noted that though the Dynasphere was only at an experimental stage, "it possesses so many advantages that we may eventually see gigantic wheels similar to that shown on our cover running along our highways in as large numbers as motor cars do to-day." According to the 2007 book Crazy Cars, one reason the Dynasphere did not succeed was that "while the [vehicle] could move along just fine, it was almost impossible to steer or brake." Another aspect of the vehicle that received criticism was the phenomenon of "gerbiling"—the tendency when accelerating or braking the vehicle for the independent housing holding the driver within the monowheel to spin within the moving structure.

Text from Wikipedia

Read Full Post »

a12103_vibrator

For centuries, doctors had been treating women for a wide variety of illnesses by performing what is now recognized as masturbation. The "pelvic massage" was especially common in the treatment of female hysteria in Great Britain during the Victorian Era, as the point of such manipulation was to cause "hysterical paroxysm" (orgasm) in the patient. However, not only did they regard the "vulvar stimulation" required as having nothing to do with sex, but reportedly found it time-consuming and hard work.

In 1902, the American company Hamilton Beach patented the first electric vibrator available for consumer retail sale as opposed to medical usage, making the vibrator the fifth domestic appliance to be electrified, after the sewing machine, fan, tea kettle, and toaster, and about a decade before the vacuum cleaner and electric iron. The home versions soon became extremely popular, with advertisements in periodicals such as Needlecraft, Woman’s Home Companion, Modern Priscilla, and the Sears, Roebuck catalogue. These disappeared in the 1920s, apparently because their appearance in pornography made it no longer tenable for mainstream society to avoid the sexual connotations of the devices.

Time-consuming and hard work my ass – Ted 😉

Image found on WeirdVintage – Text on Wikipedia

Read Full Post »

a1206_old electric

….. a bunch of society women have stolen Grandma Duck’s car.

Image found on Hagley Transportation Museum

Read Full Post »

a1080_the cyprus alarm clock

Imagine having to tell your boss you’re late for work just because you farted in your sleep 😉

Image found on break.com

Read Full Post »

a1071_ss bourgogne

Transatlantic steamer La Bourgogne entering the port of Le Havre, France, ca. 1895

Image found on AdventuresOfTheBlackgang

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: