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Posts Tagged ‘1937’

a12043_mobile home
Article from Mechanics And Handicraft found on modernmechanix.com

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a1066_greta

Greta Garbo by Arthur William Brown, done in 1937
Image found on Art Contrarian

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post_ill

Hersey Chocolate Corporation published a promotion booklet in 1937 called “HERSEY’S Favourite Recipes”. You can see the cover page above, two kids stuffing themselves with chocolate cake. Here is one of my favourite recipes from the booklet – Ted

Recipe HERE

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A digital recreation of an article published in Popular Science, October 1937

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Oval sails fastened to rods that are held at shoulder level propel the wearer of new water skis. The novel marine footgear, worn during a recent California water carnival, are made of a buoyant framework, covered with canvas to form watertight compartments. Tied at front and back, they enable the wearer to skim along the surface. Changing the angle of the sails permits traveling across the wind.

Text and image found at modernmechanix.com

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117227_beach
Click the image for a larger view (you might find Wally)

This photo is worth studying for a few moments at the bigger sizes; it’s like those WHERE’S WALDO? (okay, WHERE’S WALLY?) books. I’m going to go out on a limb and venture that the "minerals and cakes" offered for sale are not geological samples or big layer cakes but rather mineral water bottles and little snacks. The sign "Free bathing is not permitted" refers to the practice of making visitors rent one of those bath houses for the day before they could actually go in the water. Maybe this was to reduce the number of possible accidents or just cut down on unsightly pale pudgy tourists, I don’t know. Image and text found at “Dr Hermes Retro-Scans

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Article from Popular Mechanics December 1937
popular mechanics dec 1937 b
Cut-away sectional view of the eight wheel racing car shows location of the wheels and of the two powerful engines which may drive it to a new record.

Fitted with two supercharged Rolls Royce engines, an eight-wheel racing car soon will be driven over Utah’s salt beds in an attempt to break the world’s land speed record of 301.13 miles per hour. Steering is accomplished through the four front wheels. Tracks of the two sets of front wheels are different. The four rear wheels are installed side by side, dual fashion, A forty-gallon fuel tank is fitted on the seven-ton monster. Ahead of the two giant engines, which are placed side by side in the centre of the chassis, will sit the driver, Capt. George Eyston of England. With the power plant developing 3,250 horsepower and eight wheels giving increased traction, Capt. Eyston expects the machine to attain 400 miles per hour.

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Article from Popular Science July1937 found at modernmechanix.com
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Known as a “pipe perambulator,” a curious vehicle devised by a Los Angeles, Calif., draftsman turns the city’s new thirty-six-inch water-supply pipes into miniature subways for inspection men before the aqueducts are placed in service. Storage batteries and an electric motor propel the three-wheeled vehicle along the interior of a metal conduit while the operator looks for defects. A circular steel brush at the front of the machine, charged with electricity, throws off sparks wherever the inner wall of the pipe lacks a proper protective coating of enamel. The spot may be marked for later attention, or a painter towed on a diminutive trailer may remedy the trouble at once.

When the pipe opening shrinks to twenty-inch diameter, at valves spaced along the water system, the “perambulator” may be partially collapsed and pushed through the aperture ahead of the operator. A powerful searchlight illuminates the interior of the pipe for a considerable distance ahead, and a steering wheel enables the operator to guide the vehicle along the bottom of the pipe. In case one of the three pneumatic tires is punctured, the steering wheel can be used as a spare.

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