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Posts Tagged ‘1960s’

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Silvana Pampanini (born 25 September 1925) is an Italian actress. She was Miss Italy in 1946 and the following year she started her movie career.

Life and career

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Born in Rome, she became one of the most popular movie actresses in her country and was considered a sex symbol in the 1950s. In 1955 she visited New York, Denver and Hollywood but rejected job offers because she could not speak English properly and had some problems with the tax office.

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She was also popular in France, where they nicknamed her Ninì Pampan, Spain, where she worked in Tirma, South America, especially in Mexico, where she starred in Sed de Amor with Pedro Armendáriz, and Egypt. She appeared with other internationally important actors and directors such as Buster Keaton, Vittorio Gassman, Marcello Mastroianni, Alberto Sordi, Totò, Jean Gabin, Henri Vidal, Abel Gance, Vittorio De Sica. She preceded the more popular Italian stars Sophia Loren and Gina Lollobrigida who worked as extras in some of her early films. According to the press, she flirted with personalities such as Tyrone Power, William Holden, Orson Welles, Omar Sharif, George DeWitt, Marcos Pérez Jiménez and Fidel Castro; nevertheless, she never married and had no children.

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Her success was not long-lasting and in the 1960s she left the movie career to take care of her parents, preferring to appear now and then on radio and television. Additionally, she is Rosetta Pampanini‘s niece, an Italian soprano. In fact, before she became a movie star, she wanted to become an opera singer. In 1996 she published Shockingly Respectable, her autobiography written in Italian language.

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Text from Wikipedia 

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The new music of the Sixties produced parallel changes in the way rock was reflected on celluloid. The two Beatles films, A Hard Day’s Night (1964) and Help! (1965), led the way. Although the first stuck to a showbiz theme, Dick Lester‘s direction and Alun Owen‘s script showed the influence both of zany British comedy (the Goons) and of the gritty realism which dominated British fiction and film-making at that time.
Help! took the surreal comedy further, and in both the four Beatles were given parts which seemed to extend their natural wit. Other films featuring British beat groups were less enterprising (Ferry Cross The Mersey with Gerry and the Pacemakers, Catch Us if You Can with the Dave Clark Five) although What A Crazy World had Joe Brown as a cockney layabout in a film version of an excellent Joan Littlewood play.
Poster for "Ride The Wild Surf"In America, beach-party movies like Fabian’s Ride The Wild Surf (1965) continued unabated and screen exploitation of the new rock was at first limited to television, though a series of low-budget movies began to appear about the "youth question", including Riot On Sunset Strip, Wild In The Streets. and Revolution.
The sound track music for these was generally provided by punk bands such as the Standells and the Chocolate Watch Band, though Revolution included the Steve Miller Band, Quicksilver Messenger Service and Mother Earth. These films were the forerunners of more sustained examinations of rock and youth culture.
01751_musmov2In Britain, Peter Watkins’ Privilege had ex-Manfred Mann singer Paul Jones as a pop star manipulated by the authorities to channel the energies of the kids in a conformist direction. And Peter Fonda’s Easy Rider, the odyssey of two hippy bikers with la sound track featuring the Byrds and other luminaries, rivalled Mike Nicholls’ The Graduate (music by Simon and Garfunkel) as the definitive late Sixties statement on American youth.
By this point, it was almost obligatory for smart film-makers to use rock music almost as an earlier generation of directors felt it obligatory to set a scene in a sultry night-spot; Francis Ford Coppola had a John Sebastian sound track for his first feature film You’re A Big Boy Now (1966), while Antonioni’s relentlessly swinging Blow Up (1967) had a sequence in which the Yardbirds’ Jimmy Page was shown smashing a guitar, Pete Townshend-style.
Perhaps the most important development in rock movies during the Sixties was the growing importance and sophistication of the documentary. Starting with D. A. Pennebaker‘s film of Bob Dylan’s 1965 British tour, Don’t Look Back, the genre accurately reflected the rock experience at key moments throughout the decade. Most notable were the festival movies, Monterey Pop, Woodstock, and Gimme Shelter (Altamont) which, using hand-held cameras, triple screen and improved sound recording, chronicled rock’s development perfectly.

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By 1963, the New Orleans recording scene seemed quite derelict. Imperial/Minit Records had been sold by owner Lew Chudd to Liberty and the new management retreated to their West Coast home, AFO, likewise, had moved to California and Ace was having problems with its distributor, Vee Jay. Other major labels were not happy with the recording facilities available at Cosimo’s tiny studio in Gov. Nicholls Street, nor were they pleased with the obstructing tactics of the local musicians’ union. So, with the hits drying up and rock’n’roll and R&B in fast decline there seemed good reasons for long faces.
Lee DorseyBut there was light in the darkness and, as singer Earl King said, "It seemed that New Orleans was at a standstill in production, but they had more recordings done during the Sixties, I imagine, than they did during the Fifties." The departure of the outside independent labels had given the small local labels the chance to cash in on the homegrown talent.
One of the first to come up with a local hit was Frisco, with Danny White, in late 1962 with "Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye"; Rip did likewise with Deacon John, Reggie Hall and Eddie Bo and Watch had minor successes with Benny Spellman, Johnny Adams and Professor Longhair. The man responsible for these productions was Wardell Quezergue, who had learnt his trade with Dave Bartholomew‘s band and now ran the most popular aggregation in the city, the Royal Dukes of Rhythm.
Along with fellow-producer Allen Toussaint, Wardell more or less kept the New Orleans scene alive in the Sixties. Like Toussaint, be was very much aware of the trend away from the old rocking R&B music towards the funkier, slicker soul sounds and this was reflected in his modern productions.
Willie Tee and Joe Zawinul at WDSU, New Orleans, ca 1967In late 1964 Wardell formed Nola Records with Clinton Scott and had early good-sellers with Smokey Johnson, Warren Lee and Willie Tee. Early problems with pressing, distributing and promoting facilities were solved when studio owner Cosimo Matassa formed his Dover Records Corporation to cover these vital aspects.
Nola soon had a No.7 hit with Robert Parker’s dance record. "Barefootin" in 1966 and another group label, Parlo, bad a gold record, with Aaron Neville‘s "Tell It Like It Is" in early 1967. But Dover grew too big too quickly and collapsed in financial ruin in 1968 taking with it the 20 or so labels by then under its umbrella.
Out of this debacle, only Instant and Sansu survived. Although Instant, who had early hits with Chris Kenner, was merely joging along, Sansu, headed by Marshall Sehorn and Allen Toussaint, was enthusiastically clocking up international hits with Lee Dorsey on Amy. It was these two record-men who were willing and eventually able to inject new life into the long-standing New Orleans scene.

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