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jeanne-crain

Jeanne Elizabeth Crain (May 25, 1925 – December 14, 2003) was an American actress whose career spanned from 1943 to 1975. She received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress in the 1949 film Pinky, in which she played the leading role. She was also noted for her ability in ice skating.

Career

a12116_craig_05In 1944, Crain starred in Home in Indiana and In the Meantime, Darling. Her acting was critically panned, but she gained nationwide attention. It resulted in landing the leading role in The Shocking Miss Pilgrim in October 1944, a musical film which was eventually made with Betty Grable as the star.

Crain first received critical acclaim when she starred in Winged Victory (1944). She co-starred in 1945 with Dana Andrewsin the musical film State Fair, in which Louanne Hogan dubbed Crain’s singing numbers. After that, Crain often had singing parts in films, and they were invariably dubbed, in most cases by Hogan. Also in 1945, Crain starred in Leave Her to Heaven with Gene Tierney. Her ice skating ability was on display in the 1946 film, Margie, in which she and Conrad Janis danced around the ice rink as her boyfriend, Alan Young, slipped and stumbled his way along the ice.

a12116_craig_02In 1949, Crain appeared in three films — A Letter to Three Wives, The Fan, and Pinky, the latter earning her an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Pinky was controversial, since it told the story of a light-skinned African American woman who passes for white in the Northern United States. Although Lena Horne and other black actresses were considered, producer Darryl F. Zanuckchose to cast a white actress for fear of racial backlash.

Crain starred opposite Myrna Loy and Clifton Webb in the 1950 biographical film Cheaper by the Dozen. Next, Crain paired with Cary Grant in the Joseph L. Mankiewicz film of the offbeat drama People Will Talk (1951). Despite Jeanne heavily campaigning for the female lead, Anne Baxter was initially cast in the part, but when she had to forfeit due to pregnancy, Crain was given the role after all. Shortly after, she starred in Charles Brackett‘s production The Model and the Marriage Broker (1951). Cast in May 1951, Crain was Brackett’s first choice for the role. Crain was reunited with Loy for Belles on Their Toes (1952), the sequel to Cheaper by the Dozen.

a12116_craig_03While still at 20th Century Fox, Crain played a young wife quickly losing her mind amidst high-seas intrigue in Dangerous Crossing(1953), co-starring Michael Rennie. Crain then starred in a string of films for Universal Pictures, including a notable pairing with Kirk Douglas in Man Without a Star(1955).

Crain showed her dancing skills in 1955’s Gentlemen Marry Brunettes co-starring Jane Russell, Alan Young, and Rudy Vallee. The production was filmed on location inParis. The film was based on the Anita Loos sequel to Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Gentlemen Marry Brunettes was popular throughout Europe at the time and was released in France as A Paris Pour les Quatre (To Paris for the Four), and in Belgium as Cevieren Te Parijs. Later in the 1950s, Crain, Russell, and another actress formed a short-lived singing and dancing lounge act on the Strip in Las Vegas.

a12116_craig_04In 1956, Crain starred opposite Glenn Ford, Russ Tamblyn, and Broderick Crawford in the Western film The Fastest Gun Alive directed by Russell Rouse. In 1957, she played a socialite who helps a floundering singer and comedian (Frank Sinatra) redeem himself in The Joker Is Wild.

In 1959, Crain appeared in a CBS special television production of Meet Me in St. Louis. Also starring in the broadcast were Loy, Walter Pidgeon, Jane Powell, and Ed Wynn, with top billing going to Tab Hunter. Film roles became fewer in the 1960s as Crain went into semiretirement. She appeared as Nefertiti in the Italian production of Nefertiti, Queen of the Nile (1961) with Edmund Purdom and Vincent Price. During this period, Crain appeared – for the second time – as one of the mystery guests on the CBS game show, What’s My Line?, and made guest appearances on the NBC Western series, Riverboat, with Darren McGavin, and the ABC detective a12116_craig_01series,Burke’s Law, starring Gene Barry.

She starred again with Dana Andrews in Hot Rods To Hell (1967). Her last films were Skyjacked (1972) and The Night God Screamed (1975).

Legacy

Crain’s career is fully documented by a collection of memorabilia about her assembled by Charles J. Finlay, a longtime publicist at 20th Century Fox. The Jeanne Crain Collection resides at the Cinema Archives at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. These archives also hold the papers of Ingrid Bergman, Frank Capra,Clint Eastwood, and others.

Filmography

Film

Year Film Role Notes

1943

The Gang’s All Here

Chorus Girl/Pool Party Guest

uncredited

1944

Home in Indiana

‘Char’ Bruce

 

In the Meantime, Darling

Margaret ‘Maggie’ Preston

 

Winged Victory

Helen

 

1945

State Fair

Margy Frake

a.k.a. Rodgers and Hammerstein’s State Fair
also Soundtrack

Leave Her to Heaven

Ruth Berent

 

1946

Centennial Summer

Julia Rogers

also Soundtrack

Margie

Marjorie ‘Margie’ MacDuff

also Soundtrack

1948

You Were Meant for Me

Peggy Mayhew

 

Apartment for Peggy

Peggy Taylor

also Soundtrack

1949

A Letter to Three Wives

Deborah Bishop

 

The Fan

Lady Margaret ‘Meg’ Windermere

a.k.a. Lady Windermere’s Fan

Pinky

Patricia ‘Pinky’ Johnson

Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actress

1950

Cheaper by the Dozen

Ann Gilbreth

 

I’ll Get By

Jeanne Crain

uncredited
Cameo appearance

1951

Take Care of My Little Girl

Elizabeth ‘Liz’ Erickson

 

People Will Talk

Deborah Higgins

 

The Model and the Marriage Broker

Kitty Bennett

 

1952

Belles on Their Toes

Ann Gilbreth

a.k.a. Belles on Their Toes: The Further Adventures of the Gilbreth Family

O. Henry’s Full House

Della Young

Segment The Gift of the Magi

1953

Dangerous Crossing

Ruth Stanton Bowman

 

Vicki

Jill Lynn

 

City of Bad Men

Linda Culligan

 

1954

Duel in the Jungle

Marian Taylor

 

1955

Man Without a Star

Reed Bowman

 

Gentlemen Marry Brunettes

Connie Jones/Mitzi Jones

also Soundtrack

The Second Greatest Sex

Liza McClure

also Soundtrack

1956

The Fastest Gun Alive

Dora Temple

 

1957

The Tattered Dress

Diane Blane

 

The Joker Is Wild

Letty Page

a.k.a. All the Way

1960

Guns of the Timberland

Laura Riley

 

1961

Twenty Plus Two

Linda Foster

a.k.a. It Started in Tokyo

Nefertiti, Queen of the Nile

Tenet/Nefertiti

Original title: Nefertiti, regina del Nilo

1962

Madison Avenue

Peggy Shannon

 

Pontius Pilate

Claudia Procula

Original title: Ponzio Pilato

1963

Invasion 1700

Helen

Original title: Col ferro e col fuoco
a.k.a. Daggers of Blood
a.k.a. With Fire and Sword

1967

Hot Rods to Hell

Peg Phillips

a.k.a. 52 Miles to Terror

1971

The Night God Screamed

Fanny Pierce

a.k.a. Scream

1972

Skyjacked

Mrs. Clara Shaw

a.k.a. Sky Terror

Television
Year Title Role Notes

1955

Star Stage

Nancy

1 episode

1956

The Ford Television Theatre

Joyce Randall

1 episode

1958

Playhouse 90

Daisy Buchanan

1 episode

Schlitz Playhouse of Stars

Ruth Elliot

1 episode

1959

Meet Me in St. Louis

Rose Smith

TV movie

Goodyear Theatre

Lila Babrek Barnes

1 episode

Riverboat

Laura Sutton

1 episode

1960-62

G.E. True Theater

Hope/Marion Miller

3 episodes

1963

The Dick Powell Theatre

Elsie

1 episode

1964-65

Burke’s Law

Amy Booth / Lorraine Turner / Polly Martin

3 episodes

1968

The Danny Thomas Hour

Frances Merrill

1 episode

The Name of the Game

Mrs. McKendricks

1 episode

1972

Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law

Lily MacMurdy

1 episode

Text and filmography table from Wikipedia

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a12040_Lynn Bari
A curvaceous, dark-haired WWII pin-up beauty (aka “The Woo Woo Girl” and “The Girl with the Million Dollar Figure”), “B” film star Lynn Bari had the requisite looks and talent but few of the lucky breaks needed to penetrate the “A” rankings during her extensive Hollywood career. Nevertheless, some worthy performances of hers stand out in late-night viewings.

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She was born with the elite-sounding name of Margaret Schuyler Fisher on December 18, 1913 (various sources also list 1915, 1917 and 1919), in Roanoke, Virginia. She and her younger brother, John, moved with their mother to Boston following the death of their father in 1926. Her mother remarried, this time to a minister, and the family relocated once again when her stepfather was assigned a ministry in California (the Institute of Religious Science in Los Angeles).

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Paying her dues for years as a snappy bit-part chorine secretary, party girl and/or glorified extra while being groomed as a starlet under contract to MGM and Fox, her first released film was the MGM comedy Meet the Baron (1933), in which she provided typical window dressing as a collegiate. For the next few years there was little growth at either studio, as she was usually standing amidst others in crowd scenes and looking excited. Finally in Amour d’espionne (1937), she received her first billing on screen for a minor part as “Miss Fenwick”. Though more bit parts were to dribble in, the year 1938 proved to be her breakthrough year. She finally gained some ground playing the “other woman” role in glossy soaps and musicals, first giving Barbara Stanwyck some trouble in Adieu pour toujours (1938).

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Fox Studios finally handed her some smart co-leads and top supports in such second-tier films as Return of the Cisco Kid (1939), Pack Up Your Troubles (1939), Hôtel pour femmes(1939), and Hollywood Cavalcade (1939). Anxiously waiting for “the big one”, she made do with her strong looks, tending toward unsympathetic parts. She enjoyed the attention she received playing disparaging society ladies, divas, villainesses, and even a strong-willed prairie flower in such films as Pier 13 (1940), Earthbound (1940), Kit Carson (1940), and Tu seras mon mari (1941), but they did little to advance her in the ranks.

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The very best role of her frisky career came with the grade “A” comedy The Magnificent Dope (1942), in which she shared top billing with Henry Fonda and Don Ameche. But good roles were hard to find in Lynn’s case, and she good-naturedly took whatever was given her. Other above-average movies (she appeared in well over 150) of this period came withLa pagode en flammes (1942), Hello Frisco, Hello (1943), The Bridge of San Luis Rey(1944), and Nocturne (1946).

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With diminishing offers for film parts by the 1950s, she started leaning heavily towards stage and TV work. She continued her career until the late ’60s and then retired. Her last work included the film The Young Runaways (1968) and TV episodes of “The Girl from U.N.C.L.E.” and “The F.B.I.” Divorced three times in all, husband #2 was volatile manager/producer Sidney Luft, better known as Judy Garland‘s hubby years later, who was the father of her only child.

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Her third husband was a doctor/psychiatrist, and she worked as his nurse for quite some time. They divorced in 1972. Plagued by arthritis in later years, Bari passed away from heart problems on November 20, 1989. Although she may have been labeled a “B” leading lady, she definitely was in the “A” ranks when it came to class and beauty.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Gary Brumburgh

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forgotten onesJulia Marlowe, Broadway poster, 1899

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Julia Marlowe (August 17, 1865 – November 12, 1950) was an English-born American actress known for her interpretations of William Shakespeare.

Life and career

Marlowe was born as Sarah Frances Frost near Keswick, Cumberland, England, to John Frost and Sarah (Strong) Hodgson. When she was four her family emigrated to the United States. Her father, who was an avid fan of local sports, "fled to America in 1870 under the erroneous impression that he had destroyed a neighbor’s eye by flicking a whip at him during a race." He changed his name to Brough and after first settling in Kansas he moved his family east to Portsmouth, Ohio and then Cincinnati.

Early career

Marlowe obtained the nickname of "Fanny" and in her early teens began her career in the chorus of a juvenile opera company. While touring with the company for nearly a year performing Gilbert and Sullivan‘s H.M.S. Pinafore (1879), under the direction of Colonel Robert E. J. Miles (manager of the Cincinnati Opera House) she was given the part of Sir Joseph Porter. She later played in W. S. Gilbert‘s Pygmalion and Galatea.

Her training and initial success was due primarily to Miles’s sister-in-law Ada Dow. Still in Cincinnati, Fanny played her first Shakespearean roles as Balthazar in Romeo and Juliet and as Maria in Twelfth Night she was billed as Fanny Brough. Soon after Ada Dow took Fanny to New York where for several years she received voice training by Parsons Price. Finished with the voice training she changed her name to Julia Marlowe. As an unknown, twenty-year old Marlowe was, at first, unable to get a Shakesperean role, but she was determined. Colonel Miles, the new manager of the New York Bijou Opera House, gave her the opportunity to play for two weeks on tour in New England, starting in New London, Connecticut. This gave Marlowe the repertoire she needed. On 20 October 1887, her mother hired the Bijou for a matinee of Ingomar, the Barbarian (Maria Lovell’s adaptation of Friedrich Halm‘s Der Sohn der Wildnis), in which Marlowe received acclaim which served as a stepping stone to Broadway.

In early 1891, Marlowe came down with a severe case of typhoid fever while on tour in Philadelphia. The owner of the Philadelphia Times newspaper and his wife took Julia in and oversaw her return to health. At one point her face became so swollen that doctors considered lancing her face to release the toxins, but the good judgment of one doctor prevailed and a different treatment was arrived at which would fight the toxins and save her face for her acting career. Had this measure not been taken, she would never have been performing on Broadway by 1895 and would never have established herself as the leading American actress of Shakespeare in her day alongside actor E. H. Sothern.

She made her Broadway debut in 1895 and went on to appear in more than seventy Broadway productions. With the money from her first Broadway success, she bought the townhouse known as River Mansion at 337 Riverside Drive. Her first husband was Broadway actor Robert Taber. Their marriage lasted from 1894–1900 and produced no children. Taber and Marlowe were married in 1894. According to many who knew her, Marlowe sacrificed her own self-interests many times in order to promote Taber’s career. Despite this, however, professional jealousy ended their marriage in 1900. In a letter dated April 2nd, 1895 from Taber he writes "I herewith return your play. Mrs. Taber is grateful for your kindness in submitting it and notwithstanding its interest – She finds it unsuited for her present use. Very truly yours, Robert Taber". Taber was touring in England at the time of their divorce. In 1904, Marlowe starred as Mary Tudor in Kester‘s adaptation of When Knighthood Was in Flower. This was an enormous success, and made Marlowe financially independent. Other hits for Marlowe followed including Charlotte Oliver in the adaptation by Kester and Middleton of George Washington Cable‘s The Cavalier, and Ingomar, both in 1903. Of her performance in the latter, The New York Sunwrote, "There is not a woman player in America or in England that is – attractively considered – fit to unlace her shoe".

Sothern and later years

In 1904, she began an extremely successful partnership with actor E. H. Sothern, beginning with their appearances in the title roles in Romeo and Juliet, Beatrice and Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing, and the leads in Hamlet. They toured all over the U.S. in these plays, adding The Taming of the Shrew, The Merchant of Venice and Twelfth Night to their repertoire in 1905. Unhappy with their compensation from their manager, Charles Frohman, they continued under the management of the Shubert Brothers, from then on receiving a percentage of the profits. In 1906, together with Sothern, she played the title character in Percy MacKaye‘s Jeanne d’Arc, Salome in Sudermann‘s John the Baptist and Rautendelein in The Sunken Bell, receiving favorable reviews. By this time, Marlowe and Sothern were known as the premier Shakespearean actors in their day.

In 1906 Julia wrote a letter to her friend Elisabeth Greer during her 1905-1906 season in which she was performing The Merchant of Venice, The Taming of the Shrew, and Twelfth Night with co-star and future husband, E. H. Sothern. It is believed Mrs. Greer lived in Minneapolis. She offers her friend seats to the performances the coming weekend and promises to come to her on Friday for lunch. The letter reads: St. Paul, Minn. 10 April. 1906 My dear Mrs. Greer: I will go to you for luncheon on Friday, and you are very kind to say I may choose my own time and I do so. I hope 12:30 seems reasonable to you. That will be my breakfast. Will you consult with the other members of your family and decide whether you would like a box for Friday or Saturday evening. With all affectionate greeting to you and cordial remembrances for all your house. I am, Faithfully Julia Marlowe

After another season in New York and then on tour, Sothern, Marlowe and their company crossed the Atlantic to play in London. They were unable to attract audiences in England, however, and returned to America after a season. Back in the U.S., they presented Shakespeare at affordable prices at the Academy of Music in New York, allowing audiences who had not previously been able to afford their productions to see them. Marlowe and Sothern dissolved their company and formed separate companies for a time. She played in J. B. Fagan‘s Gloria, in Romeo and Juliet and in As You Like It. in 1908, she played Yvette inMary Johnston‘s verse play The Goddess of Reason.

At the end of 1909, Sothern and Marlowe reunited in Antony and Cleopatra. In 1910, they toured in Macbeth, receiving enthusiastic notices and bringing the production to New York where it was a hit. They then continued to tour their Shakespearean repertoire, also playing special performances of the plays for children at schools. Marlowe and Sothern married in 1911. Marlowe and Sothern made eleven phonograph recordings for the Victor company in 1920 and 1921. These recordings are presumably the only recorded evidence of Marlowe’s voice today. After more touring with Sothern in Shakespeare, the two brought their production of The Merchant of Venice to New York in 1921. Soon afterwards, Marlowe’s health was failing, and she retired in 1924. After Sothern’s death in 1933, Marlowe became somewhat of a recluse. White haired and still beautiful she’d occasionally visit close friends like ailing playwright Edward Sheldon. In 1923, she received an honorary doctorate fromGeorge Washington University, and another in 1943 from Columbia University.

Julia Marlowe died in 1950 in New York City at the age of 85. She had no children.

Text from Wikipedia 

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Barbara Bach
(born Barbara Goldbach; August 27, 1947) is an American actress and model known as the Bond girlAnya Amasova from the James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me (1977). She subsequently starred in Force 10 from Navarone (1978) with Robert Shaw and Harrison Ford. She is married to former Beatle Ringo Starr.

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Early life

Bach was born in Rosedale, Queens, and grew up in Jackson Heights, the daughter of Marjorie and Howard I. Goldbach (1922–2001), a policeman. Her mother is Irish Catholic, while her father was Jewish (from a family from Germany, Austria, and Romania). She attended a Catholic high school, Dominican Commercial, in Jamaica, Queens. Bach left school at age 16 to become a model. She is not related to Catherine Bach, whose birth name is Bachman.

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Career

In 1972, Bach co-starred with two other Bond girls, Claudine Auger and Barbara Bouchet in the mystery La Tarantola dal ventre nero (a giallo film) and had small roles in other Italian films.

In 1977, her role as the Russian spy Anya Amasova in The Spy Who Loved Me gained her recognition as an international sex symbol. Bach remarked after the film that Bond is "a chauvinist pig who uses girls to shield him against bullets." The following year she appeared in the movie Force 10 from Navarone. She lost a role to actress Shelley Hack when she auditioned for the television series Charlie’s Angels. Bach has 28 films to her credit. She has not worked as an actress since the mid-1980s. She featured in her own pictorial in Playboy in June 1977, and she was the cover girl and had her own pictorial in January 1981. She also had a cameo in a September 1987 special issue on the Bond girls.

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Filmography

Year Title Role
1968  L’Odissea (a.k.a. The Adventures of Ulysses) Nausicaa
1971 Mio padre Monsignore Chiara
 La Tarantola dal ventre nero (a.k.a. Black Belly of the Tarantula) Jenny
 La Corta notte delle bambole di vetro (a.k.a. Paralyzed / Short Night of Glass Dolls) Mira Svoboda
 Un peu de soleil dans l’eau froide (a.k.a. A Few Hours of Sunlight / A Little Sun in Cold Water) Héloïse/Elvire
1972  I Predatori si muovono all’alba Helen
1973  Paolo il caldo (a.k.a. The Sensual Man / The Sensuous Sicilian) Anna
 Il Maschio ruspante Rema
 L’ Ultima chance (a.k.a. Last Chance / Motel of Fear) Emily
1974  Il Cittadino si ribella (a.k.a. Street Law / The Citizen Rebels) Barbara
1975  Il Lupo dei mari (a.k.a. Legend of the Sea Wolf / Larsen, Wolf of the Seven Seas) Maud Brewster
1977  Ecco noi per esempio Ludovica
 The Spy Who Loved Me Anya Amasova
1978  Force 10 from Navarone Maritza Petrovich
1979  L’ Isola degli uomini pesce (a.k.a. Island of the Fishmen / Screamers) Amanda Marvin
 L’ Umanoide (a.k.a. The Humanoid) Lady Agatha
 Jaguar Lives Anna Thompson
 Il Fiume del grande caimano (a.k.a. Alligators / The Big Alligator River / The Great Alligator) Alice Brandt
1980  Up the Academy Bliss
1981  Caveman Lana
 The Unseen Jennifer Fast
1982 The Cooler  
1983  Princess Daisy Vanessa Valerian
1984  Give My Regards to Broad Street Journalist
1986  To the North of Katmandu  

Text and table from Wikipedia

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778_benton_00Susanne Benton (born February 3, 1948) is an American actress known for her film roles as General Dreedle’s WAC in Catch-22 (1970) and Quilla June Holmes in A Boy and His Dog (1975). During her early roles she refused to disrobe for her parts, despite the requests of her Universal Studios bosses. She appeared topless in Playboy in the May 1970 issue. In 1972, she appeared in the Andy Griffith film The Strangers in 7A, credited under her birth name, Susanne Hildur. She also used that alias when appearing in Barnaby Jones a year later.

She became convinced at the age of six that she would become a major star. She also believed that she would die before she reached her 28th birthday. She married James A Benton in 1966.

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Selected filmography

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"A forty-one inch bust and a lot of perseverance will get you more than a cup of coffee – a lot more. But most girls don’t know what to do with what they’ve got."Jayne Mansfield

You can say what you like about Jayne Mansfield, but she sure knew how to get the best out of what she got – Ted

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In Context
Carroll Baker (born May 28, 1931) is a former American actress who has enjoyed popularity as both a serious dramatic actress and, particularly in the 1960s, as a movie sex symbol. Despite being cast in a wide range of roles during her heyday, Baker’s beautiful features, blonde hair, and distinctive drawl made her particularly memorable in roles as a brash, flamboyant woman.

Image found at VintageBooty

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Jeanette Helen Morrison (July 6, 1927 – October 3, 2004), known professionally as Janet Leigh, was an American actress and author. She is best remembered for her performance in Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960), for which she was awarded the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress. By her marriage to actor Tony Curtis, she was the mother of Jamie Lee Curtis and Kelly Curtis.

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Discovered by actress Norma Shearer, Leigh secured a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and made her film debut with a starring role in The Romance of Rosy Ridge in 1947. Over the following years, she appeared in several popular films of a wide variety of genres, including Act of Violence (1948), Little Women (1949), Holiday Affair (1949), Angels in the Outfield (1951), Scaramouche (1952), The Naked Spur (1953), Walking My Baby Back Home (1953) and Living It Up (1954).

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After two brief marriages at a young age, Leigh married actor Tony Curtis in 1951. The couple received significant media attention and starred in five films together: Houdini (1953), The Black Shield of Falworth (1954), The Vikings (1958), The Perfect Furlough (1958) and Who Was That Lady? (1960). Leigh played mostly dramatic roles during the latter half of the 1950s, in films such as Safari (1955), and Touch of Evil (1958). She continued to appear occasionally in films and television, including The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and two films with her daughter Jamie Lee Curtis: The Fog (1980) and Halloween H20: 20 Years Later (1998).

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Leigh died in 2004 at the age of 77, following a year-long battle with vasculitis, an inflammation of the blood vessels. She was survived by her fourth husband of 42 years, Robert Brandt, and her two daughters by actor Tony Curtis.

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293_Deanna Lund_01Deanna Lund (born May 30, 1937) is an American film and television actress best remembered for her role in the Irwin Allen television series Land of the Giants, where she played the character of Valerie Ames Scott.

Early life
After the series was cancelled, she married co-star Don Matheson, but they were divorced in the late 1970s. Their daughter Michele Matheson is also an actress. Lund is an alum of Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida.

In 1995, she dated Larry King, and the couple were engaged five weeks after they met. The relationship ended before they could marry.

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Career
Valerie in Giantland, a novella written by Lund, is based on the Land of the Giants series, and set ten years later; written from the point of view of Lund’s character, Valerie Ames. She also played the lead role in the 1989 Christmas horror film Elves. In 1976, she appeared on the drama General Hospital as Peggy Lowell, the secretary and mistress of Cameron Faulkner, who was played by Lund’s husband Don Matheson.

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Linda Denise Blair (born January 22, 1959) is an American actress. Blair is best known for her role as the possessed child, Regan, in the film The Exorcist (1973), for which she was nominated for an Academy Award and two Golden Globes, winning one. She reprised her role in Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977).

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Known background and early career
B
lair was born in St. Louis, Missouri, and was raised in Westport, Connecticut. She began her career as a six-year-old child model and started acting with a regular role on the short-lived Hidden Faces (1968-69) daytime soap. Her first theatrical film appearance was in The Way We Live Now (1970). Blair was selected from a field of 600 applicants for her most notable role as Regan in The Exorcist (1973). The role earned her a Golden Globe and People’s Choice Award for Best Supporting Actress as well as an Academy Award nomination. She reprised her role in the sequel, Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977), garnering a Saturn Award nomination for Best Actress of 1978. Between these two films, she appeared in the television films Born Innocent (1974), Airport 1975 (1974), Sarah T. – Portrait of a Teenage Alcoholic (1975) and Sweet Hostage (1975) opposite Martin Sheen.

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205_elaine_stewart_001Elaine Stewart (May 31, 1930 – June 27, 2011) was an American actress and model.

Life
Stewart was born in Montclair, New Jersey as Elsy Steinberg. She was one of five children born into a German Jewish family. In 1961, nearing the end of her television career, she married actor Bill Carter. After her divorce from Carter, she married television producer Merrill Heatter on December 31, 1964. They had a son, Stewart, and a daughter, Gabrielle.

Career
Stewart made her debut by winning Miss See in See Magazine in 1952, with measurements 34–25–36. She was in many magazines such as Playboy and Photoplay.

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She had a supporting role in The Bad and the Beautiful (1952), as Lila. She was featured as the love interest of Sgt Ryan played by Richard Widmark in Take the High Ground (1953) as Julie. She appeared in other films, such as Brigadoon, Night Passage, The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond, and The Adventures of Hajji Baba. In her last television appearance in 1964 she played actress Irene Grey in the Perry Mason episode, "The Case of the Capering Camera," starring Raymond Burr.

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Stewart was also known as the co-hostess on two 1970s game shows, Gambit with Wink Martindale and the nighttime edition of High Rollers with Alex Trebek, which were both produced by her husband.

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Quite honestly, from what I’ve read about the lady over the years I would have thought she had a more stylish bathroom, cleaner if nothing else – Ted 😉

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Actress Betty Grable’s famous legs as she models white shorts while getting into driver’s seat of car. Hollywood, CA June 1943. Photo by Walter Sanders.

Text & image from: the bone orchard

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173_michele_carey_005Michele Carey (born 26 February 1943, Annapolis, Maryland) is an American actress. She was also a child piano prodigy and a model. Touted as a discovery of Howard Hawks, she made her film debut in Hawks’ El Dorado (1966), starring John Wayne and Robert Mitchum. She went on to co-star in the Elvis Presley musical Live a Little, Love a Little (1968), The Sweet Ride (1968), and played an anachronistically miniskirted Indian girl in Frank Sinatra’s Dirty Dingus Magee (1970). That same year she also made Five Savage Men with Henry Silva and Keenan Wynn.

On television she did guest-starring roles on The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1966), Mission Impossible (1969), It Takes a Thief (1970), and three episodes of The Wild Wild West ("The Night of the Feathered Fury", 1967 and the two-part "The Night of the Winged Terror" 1969) and held the title role in the Jan 17, 1972 episode of Gunsmoke entitled Tara. She also appeared in the second The Six Million Dollar Man pilot film (1973) and an episode of Starsky and Hutch. She provided the recurring female computer voice in A Man Called Sloane (1979-80), starring Robert Conrad.

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Fading from view in the late ’70s, Carey staged a brief comeback in the mid-’80s in such films as In the Shadow of Kilimanjaro (1986). She also appeared as Crystal in a 1982 episode of the television series The Fall Guy.

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152_anne_gwynne_001Anne Gwynne (December 10, 1918 – March 31, 2003) was an American film actress of the 1940s. Known as one of the first scream queens because of her numerous appearances in horror films, the actress-model was also one of the most popular pin-ups of World War II.

Career
In 1939, she became a model for Catalina Swimwear.

Gwynne was a television pioneer, appearing in TV’s first filmed series, Public Prosecutor (1947–48), 26 mysteries each 17½ minutes in running time, produced by Jerry Fairbanks.

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When the DuMont Television Network aired the series, they stopped the film before the climax and a live three-member panel would try to guess the identity of the culprit. Other TV stations could buy rights to air this series but usually did not use panelists.

Personal life
Gwynne was born Marguerite Gwynne Trice in Waco, Texas, the daughter of Pearl (née Guinn) and Jefferson Benjamin Trice, an apparel manufacturer. Gwynne married Max M. Gilford in 1945. The couple had two children, Gregory and Gwynne, an actress. Gwynne Gilford‘s children are actress Katherine Pine and actor Chris Pine. Gwynne died March 31, 2003 of a stroke following surgery at the Motion Picture Country Hospital in Woodland Hills, California.

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152_anne_gwynne_006Filmography
Unexpected Father (1939)
Bad Man from Red Butte (1940)
Black Friday (1940)
Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe (1940)
The Green Hornet (1940)
The Black Cat (1941)
Nice Girl? (1941)
Washington Melodrama (1941)
The Strange Case of Dr. RX (1942)
Broadway (1942)
Ride ‘Em Cowboy (1942)
We’ve Never Been Licked (1943)
House of Frankenstein (1944)
152_anne_gwynne_009Weird Woman (1944)
The Glass Alibi (1946)
Dick Tracy Meets Gruesome (1947)
The Ghost Goes Wild (1947)
Public Prosecutor (TV series, 1947-48)
Arson, Inc. (1949)
Teenage Monster (1958)
Adam at Six A.M. (1970

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117_nancy_kovack_001Nancy Kovack (born March 11, 1936) is an American former actress, known for many film and television roles, mostly in the 1960’s and 1970’s.

Biography
She was born in Flint, Michigan. She attended the University of Michigan at age 15 and graduated by 19. At the age of 20 she had won eight beauty titles.

Kovack became interested in acting when she went to New York City to attend a wedding and became one of the Glea Girls for Jackie Gleason. She has appeared on a number of TV episodes, including Star Trek, Bewitched (playing Darrin Stephens‘ catty ex-fiancee and Samantha’s nemesis, Sheila 117_nancy_kovack_006Sommers), Batman, I Dream of Jeannie, Get Smart, Perry Mason, 12 O’Clock High, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Invaders episode Task Force in season 2/16, and Burke’s Law. In 1969 she was nominated for an Emmy for an appearance on Mannix. On Broadway she appeared in The Disenchanted.

As she gained fame, Kovack began to win roles in Hollywood movies, most notably as the high priestess Medea in Jason and the Argonauts (1963). She also had parts in Strangers When We Meet (1960), The Wild Westerners, Diary of a Madman (1963) with Vincent Price, The Outlaws Is Coming (1965) with The Three Stooges, Sylvia (1965), The Great Sioux Massacre (1965), The Silencers (1966), Tarzan and the Valley of Gold (1966), and the Elvis Presley film Frankie and Johnny (1966).

Her last film role was in Marooned (1969), a science fiction drama. She played the murder victim in the made-for-TV movie/series pilot Ellery Queen (also known as Too Many Suspects) (1975), "Monica Gray," and was credited as Nancy Mehta.

Personal life
In 1969, Kovack married conductor Zubin Mehta, then music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and later music director of the New York Philharmonic. Thereafter she dedicated herself to her marriage, giving up her stage and screen career in 1976 after making her farewell appearance on Cannon. Kovack and Mehta maintain residences in Brentwood, California and Tuscany, Italy. Nancy and Zubin Mehta do not have any biological children together. Kovack is a devout Christian Scientist. Zubin Mehta is a Zoroastrian.

Until 2006, the Mehtas spent some months of the year in residence in Munich, Germany, where Zubin Mehta was the Music Director of the Bavarian State Opera. Mr. Mehta is currently Music Director for life of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra  and the Main Conductor for Valencia’s opera house. Zubin Mehta is also the chief conductor of Florence, Italy’s Maggio Musicale festival.

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Susan McDougal (of Whitewater controversy notoriety) worked as Kovack’s personal assistant in the early 1990s. After her employment ended, Kovack took legal action against McDougal for alleged embezzlement. McDougal was acquitted in 1998 on all twelve charges. A suit by McDougal in 1999 for malicious prosecution ended in a settlement.

Kovack maintains a luxury home rental business catering to the rental needs of the wealthy. Tony Bennett reportedly regularly rents her lavish Tuscan home some months out of the year.

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Vivacious blue-eyed blonde Penny Edwards was born in New York City in 1928 and displayed signs of musical talent as a youth. She began studying dance by age six and, as a teen, appeared on Broadway in "The Ziegfeld Follies of 1943". After a couple of other musicals and a stint with the St. Louis Municipal Opera, she was signed by Warner 11749162_pe2Brothers in 1947. She showed great perk and promise as a second lead, singing and dancing opposite the likes of Dennis Morgan and Ben Blue in her film debut, My Wild Irish Rose (1947). She continued on winningly in the Shirley Temple vehicle That Hagen Girl (1947); then alongside Morgan again in Two Guys from Texas (1948); with Donald O’Connor and Marjorie Main in the rube musical Feudin’, Fussin’ and A-Fightin’ (1948); and in another musical, Tucson (1949).

After a successful vaudeville tour, Penny was signed by Republic Pictures and started off in a series of "prairie flower" ingénue roles while temporarily replacing a pregnant Dale Evans in a number of Roy Rogers oaters. In 1951, she wed agent Ralph Winters and had two daughters: Deborah Winters (born 1954), who would go on to become an actress in her own right, and Rebecca (born 1956). After a succession of "B" movies, 11749162_pe3Penny left Hollywood to focus on religious work. She later reappeared on the more popular TV shows of the day, including the westerns "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957), "Wagon Train" (1957) and "Bonanza" (1959), and in light-hearted entertainment alongside Robert Cummings and Red Skelton in their respective shows. Penny’s lovely, ladylike features also made a significant dent in the commercial market, appearing as "The Lux Girl", "The Palmolive Girl" and "The Tiparillo Girl".

Following her divorce in 1958, Penny married Jerry Friedman and they had a son, David. That 1964 union would end up in the divorce courts as well. Penny retired from show biz completely by the mid-1960s and died, in 1998, of lung cancer, just two days after her 70th birthday.

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June Knight (January 22, 1913 – June 16, 1987) was an American Broadway and film actress.

11749160_jk2Aged 19, she appeared in the last Ziegfeld Follies show, Hot-Cha! (1932). She would be featured in four other Broadway shows, Take A Chance (1932), Jubilee (1935) (where she introduced the Cole Porter classic "Begin the Beguine"), The Would-Be Gentleman (1946) (her only non-musical) and Sweethearts (1947).

She also had a short-lived film career, appearing in twelve movies from 1930 to 1940, most notably in Broadway Melody of 1936 (1935), in which she sang the hit song "I’ve Got a Feelin’ You’re Foolin’" with co-star Robert Taylor.

She died in 1987, at 74, from complications from a stroke, and was interred in Pierce Brothers Valhalla Memorial Park.

For her contribution to the motion picture industry, June Knight has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6247 Hollywood Boulevard.

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11749149_me1Marla English (born January 4, 1934 in San Diego, California) is a motion picture actress from San Diego, California who made movies in the 1950s.

English was originally signed to a contract by Paramount Pictures after winning a San Diego beauty pageant. She was paid $100 per picture to appear in such films as Red Garters (1954) and Rear Window (1954).

She received a major break when she was cast opposite Spencer Tracy in The Mountain, a film which was to be made in France. Marla was given a smallpox vaccine before leaving to go on location. She quickly developed a raging fever and decided to pull out of making the movie. Paramount suspended English and signed actress, Barbara Darrow, to make the film.

Parade Magazine questioned English about her decision in September 1955. She said it was a very dumb move and was unsure why she decided against making The Mountain. A close relative told the publication that English had fallen in love with Paramount actor Larry Pennell. She became enraged when the studio would not give Pennell a role in the film, so they could travel to France together.

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English made mostly B-movie films throughout her career in Hollywood. Some of these include Three Bad Sisters (1956), Runaway Daughters (1956), The She Creature (1956), Flesh and the Spur (1957), and Voodoo Woman (1957). In 1955 she played with John Ireland and Pennell in Hell’s Horizon.

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She gave up her acting career in 1956 when she became engaged to San Diego businessman A. Paul Sutherland. English was just 21 at the time.

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