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Posts Tagged ‘Automobiles’

11113_carioca
Volvo PV 36 Carioca is an automobile manufactured by Volvo between 1935 and 1938. The word Carioca describes someone from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and was also the name of a dance that was fashionable in Sweden at the time when the car was introduced.

Visually the car was styled similarly to the then strikingly modern Chrysler Airflow. Volvo styling was heavily influenced by North American auto-design trends in the 1930s and 1940s, many of the company’s senior engineers having previously worked in the US Auto-industry.

The PV36 was the first Volvo to offer an independent front suspension, but the car used the same side-valve engine as the traditional Volvo cars that were still produced alongside the modern Carioca. The PV36 was an expensive car, with a price at 8,500 kronor and Volvo didn’t build more than 500 cars. The last one wasn’t sold until 1938.
Text from Wikipedia 

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11094_fiat

The Fiat 500, commonly known as Topolino ("little mouse", the Italian name for Mickey Mouse), is an Italian automobile model manufactured by Fiat from 1936 to 1955.

The Topolino was one of the smallest cars in the world at the time of its production. Launched in 1937, three models were produced until 1955, all with only minor mechanical and cosmetic changes. It was equipped with a 569 cc four-cylinder, side valve, water-cooled engine mounted in front of the front axle, and so was a full-scale car rather than a cyclecar. The radiator was located behind the engine which made possible a lowered wind-cheating nose profile at a time when competitor vehicles confronted the world with flat near vertical front grills. The shape of the car’s front gave it exceptional forward visibility.

Suspension at the back initially depended on quarter-elliptic rear springs, but somehow buyers frequently squeezed four or five people into the nominally two seater car, and in later models the chassis was extended at the rear to allow for more robust semi-elliptic springs.

With horsepower of about 13 bhp, its top speed was about 53 mph (85 km/h), and it could achieve about 39.2 miles per US gallon (6.00 L/100 km; 47.1 mpg-imp). The target price given when the car was planned was 5,000 lire. In the event the price at launch was 9,750 lire, though the decade was one of falling prices in several part of Europe and later in the 1930s the Topolino was sold for about 8,900 lire. Despite being more expensive than first envisaged, the car was very competitively priced. Nearly 520,000 were sold.

In 1955 the mid-size rear wheel drive Fiat 600 was launched by Fiat and that would become the design basis for the new Fiat 500, the Nuova 500. The Nuova 500 is often thought, mistakenly, to be the only model 500 Fiat. Text from Wikipedia 

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11087_imp

Of course you have to overdo a little when you’re pushing your products, but calling the body on this little runter sensational is beyond the realm not only of reality but even way past the realm of fantasy. And so is calling it safe.
I know I could have showed you one of the great cars on Forgotten Fiberglass, but my tastes run more to the strange and humorous, so there you are.

  Read the whole article here, and here  and find fiber glass cars that are really sensational as well on:
Forgotten-Fiberglass

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11084_rr

In a world of plastic cars with hybrid heartbeats, the joy of driving is a dying art.  This 1939 Rolls-Royce Phantom III “Vutotal” Cabriolet by Labourdette recalls an era when driving was always an artful experience.  Yet this is not your standard Rolls Royce Phantom III, this is the result of a complete rebuild by the Parisian designer Henri Labourdette.

See more photos and read the whole story here:The-Coollist

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11080_austin

The A35 was a small (compact) car sold by the British Motor Corporation under the Austin marque in the 1950s.

Design
Introduced in 1956, it replaced the highly successful Austin A30. The name reflected the larger and more powerful 34 hp (25 kW) A-Series straight-4 engine, enabling a slightly higher top speed and better acceleration.

The A35 was very similar in appearance to the A30, except for a larger rear window aperture and a painted front grille, with chrome horse-shoe surround, instead of the chrome grille featured on the A30. Both had 13 in (330 mm) wheels. The semaphore turn-signal indicators were replaced with present-day front- and rear-mounted flashing lights. A slightly easier to operate remote-control gear-change was provided. Much of the improved performance was a result of different gearbox ratios. The A30 had the first three ratios close together then a big gap to top (4th gear). The A35 ratios were better spaced and gave a max speed in third of 60 mph (97 km/h) against about 45 mph (72 km/h) for the A30.

Like the A30, the A35 was offered as a 2- or 4-door saloon or 2-door "Countryman" estate and also as a van. The latter model continued in production through to 1968. A rare pickup version was also produced in 1956, with just 475 sold.

The A35 passenger cars were replaced by the new body shape A40 Farina models in 1959 but the estate car version continued until 1962 and van until 1968.

The A35 was quite successfully raced in its day and can still be seen today at historic race meetings.

Performance
A two door de luxe saloon with the 948 cc engine was tested by the British Motor magazine in 1956 and was found to have a top speed of 71.9 mph (115.7 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 30.1 seconds. A fuel consumption of 41.5 miles per imperial gallon (6.81 L/100 km; 34.6 mpg-US) was recorded. The test car cost £554 including taxes of £185.

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11078_mal
During the early 20th century, automobiles were built in Spain only in Madrid, Barcelona and, believe it or not, Palma de Mallorca. In 1920, Señores Rafael de Lacy y Gual, Albert Ouvriard and Antonio Ribas Reus established the Loryc (Lacy, Ouvriard, Ribas y Cía) motorcar factory in Palma. Manufacturing of 2-, 3-, 4- and 6-seat models, including some racing cars, continued in Mallorca until 1926 when production was moved to France. After that and until 1930, car parts were re-imported from France to Mallorca and assembled here, something to do with peculiar tax regulations and excise duties in Spain at that time. In all, a total of some 130 vehicles were manufactured lovingly by hand in Palma.

The sports cars achieved some spectacular results, including on circuits like Le Mans (France) and the Vuelta a Catalunya. Six classic Loryc cars are said to still be in running condition, four of them in private collections here in Mallorca and two more, in Menorca.

Image and text found at:Mallorca-daily-photo-blog
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11069_1800

Planned in Sweden, designed in Italy, unveiled at the car show in Brussels, built in Britain and a huge success in the USA. The Volvo P1800 is perhaps Volvo’s most internationally renowned model ever and the one that arouses most emotions.
Text from CARTYPE, read the whole article here

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11067_il

The BMW 600 was a four-seat microcar produced by BMW from mid-1957 until November 1959. Partially based on the BMW Isetta two-seater, it was BMW’s first postwar four seat economy car. It was not a sales success, but it began the design process for its more successful successor, the BMW 700.

BMW needed to expand its model range, but they did not have the resources to develop an all-new car with an all-new engine. Therefore, it used the Isetta as starting point for a new four seat economy car.

As a result, the 600 used the front suspension and front door of the Isetta.The need to carry four people required a longer frame, a different rear suspension, and a larger engine. A new perimeter frame was designed, using box section side members and straight tube crossmembers. The rear suspension was an independent semi trailing arm design; this was the first time BMW had used this system. The chassis had a wheelbase of 1,700 millimetres (67 in), a front track of 1,220 millimetres (48 in), and a rear track of 1,160 millimetres (46 in).

The 600 was powered by the 582 cc (35.5 cu in) flat-twin engine from the R67 motorcycle/sidecar combination. This engine, which delivered 19.5 horsepower (14.5 kW) at 4,500 revolutions per minute, was mounted behind the rear wheels. A four-speed manual gearbox was standard, while a Saxomat semi-automatic transmission was available.

Access to the rear seats was by a conventional door on the right side of the vehicle.

The sales figures for the 600 did not meet BMW’s expectations. During production from August 1957 to 1959, about 35,000 were built. This is attributed to competition with more conventional cars, including the Volkswagen Beetle.

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11062_nt

If you can’t afford the Airstream trailer in the last post or any other trailer for that matter then this might be just the thing for you. It looks like the bloke is preparing some sort of roofing even. Although not the best arrangements for windy day, rather a nifty idea.

  Image found at:Chromjuwelen-En-Route

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11053_600mu

The original Fiat Multipla and 600 Multipla were based on the Fiat 600’s drivetrain, model 1100 coil and wishbone independent front suspension, and sat 6 people in a footprint just 50 centimetres (19.7 in) longer than the original Mini Cooper. The driver compartment was moved forward over the front axle, eliminating the boot in effect but giving the body very MPV-like one-box look. Behind the front seat the vehicle could be arranged with a flat floor area or a choice of one or two bench seats.

Until the 1970s it was widely used as a taxi in many parts of Italy.

A 633 cc right hand drive Multipla was tested by the British magazine The Motor in 1956 and was found to have a top speed of 57.1 mph (91.9 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-50 mph (80 km/h) in 43.0 seconds. A fuel consumption of 38.4 miles per imperial gallon (7.36 L/100 km; 32.0 mpg-US) was recorded. The test car cost £799 including taxes on the UK market.

Pinifarina designed a remarkable open topped Multipla called the "Marine" with a wooden slat wraparound bench in the rear -photos of it can be found on the Internet

A Fiat 600 Multipla towing a caravan is used in the video clip of the Crowded House hit Weather with You from their 1991 album Woodface.

The Multipla name was re-introduced in the late-1990s for the Fiat Multipla compact MPV. Text from Wikipedia 

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11045_topolino

The Fiat 500, commonly known as Topolino (“little mouse”, the Italian name for Mickey Mouse), is an Italian automobile model manufactured by Fiat from 1936 to 1955.

History
The Topolino was one of the smallest cars in the world at the time of its production. Launched in 1937, three models were produced until 1955, all with only minor mechanical and cosmetic changes. It was equipped with a 569 cc four-cylinder, side valve, water-cooled engine mounted in front of the front axle, and so was a full-scale car rather than a cycle car. The radiator was located behind the engine which made possible a lowered wind-cheating nose profile at a time when competitor vehicles confronted the world with flat near vertical front grills. The shape of the car’s front gave it exceptional forward visibility.

Suspension at the back initially depended on quarter-elliptic rear springs, but somehow buyers frequently squeezed four or five people into the nominally two seater car, and in later models the chassis was extended at the rear to allow for more robust semi-elliptic springs.

With horsepower of about 13 bhp, its top speed was about 53 mph (85 km/h), and it could achieve about 39.2 miles per US gallon (6.00 L/100 km; 47.1 mpg-imp). The target price given when the car was planned was 5,000 lire. In the event the price at launch was 9,750 lire, though the decade was one of falling prices in several part of Europe and later in the 1930s the Topolino was sold for about 8,900 lire. Despite being more expensive than first envisaged, the car was very competitively priced. Nearly 520,000 were sold.

In 1955 the mid-size rear wheel drive Fiat 600 was launched by Fiat and that would become the design basis for the new Fiat 500, the Nuova 500. The Nuova 500 is often thought, mistakenly, to be the only model 500 Fiat.

New “Topolino”
Fiat is known to be working on a low-cost entry-level city car, to fit into its range below both the Fiat 500 and Panda, codename Topolino. Based on the A-platform used by the Fiat 500 and Fiat Panda but shortened to 3,000 mm (118.1 in) in length, the new Topolino will seat four people. This is scheduled for production in 2010.

The new Topolino will be built in the former Zastava plant in Kragujevac, Serbia. Fiat said the company will invest 700 million euros to modernize the Kragujevac plant. The Serbian government will contribute 300 million euros through tax breaks, incentives and infrastructure for the new plant. By the end of next year, Fiat plans to build 200,000 units a year in Kragujevac. Capacity will grow to 300,000 units from 2010 with the addition of the B-compact models.

Electric versions
Fiat has unveiled the Fiat Phylla concept solar car, showing all the technology that will feature in the electric Topolino. Price is expected € 12,500. Text from wikipedia 

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11043_hn6
Hellé Nice (born Mariette Hélène Delangle 15 December 1900 in Aunay-sous-Auneau, Eure-et-Loir, France; died 1 October 1984 in Nice, France) was a model, dancer, and a Grand Prix motor racing driver.

11043_hn1Racing career
At the time, the Paris area was one of the principal centres of the French car industry and there were numerous competitions for auto enthusiasts. Nice loved the thrill of driving fast cars and so snatched the chance to perform in the racing event at the annual fair organized by fellow performers from the Paris entertainment world. An athletic woman, she was also an avid downhill skier but an accident on the slopes damaged her knee and ended her dancing career. Perhaps inspired by Charlotte Versigny who had competed in a Talbot racer in the 1927 Grand Prix de la Baule, Hellé Nice decided to try her hand at professional auto racing. In 1929, driving an Omega-Six, she won an all-female Grand Prix race at Autodrome de Montlhéry in the process setting a new world land speed record for women. Capitalizing on her fame, the following year she toured the United States, racing at a variety of tracks in an American-made Miller racing car.

Philippe de Rothschild introduced himself to her shortly after her return from America. For a time, the two shared a bed and the love of automobile racing. Rothschild had been racing his Bugatti and he introduced her to Ettore Bugatti. The owner of the very successful car company thought Nice would be an ideal person to add to the male drivers of his line of racing vehicles. Having been outspoken in her desire to compete with the men, she achieved her goal and in 1931 and drove a Bugatti Type 35C in five major Grands Prix in France. A master of showmanship, Hellé Nice was easily recognizable in her bright-blue race car. She loved every minute of her life and exploited her femininity, portraying herself as a fearless competitor up against hard-driving men. She wowed the crowds wherever she raced while adding to her income with a string of product endorsements. Although she did not win a Grand Prix race, she was a legitimate competitor, and frequently finished ahead of some of the top male drivers .

11043_hn5Over the next several years, as the only female on the Grand Prix circuit, Nice continued to race Bugattis and Alfa Romeos against the greatest drivers of the day including Tazio Nuvolari, Robert Benoist, Rudolf Caracciola, Louis Chiron, Bernd Rosemeyer, Luigi Fagioli, and Jean-Pierre Wimille, among others. Like most race drivers, she competed not only in Grand Prix races but also hillclimbs and rallies all over Europe, including the famous Monte Carlo Rally. On 10 September 1933, she was a competitor in one of the most tragic races in history. During the 1933 Italian Grand Prix at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Giuseppe Campari, Baconin "Mario Umberto" Borzacchini, and the Polish count Stanislas Czaikowski, three of the leading race drivers of the day, were killed.

Crash
In 1936, Nice traveled to Brazil to compete in two Grand Prix races. During the São Paulo Grand Prix, she was in second place behind Brazilian champion Manuel de Teffé when a freak accident resulted in her nearly being killed. Reports on the matter vary, but a bale of straw ended up on the track and she slammed into it at more than 100mph causing her to lose control. Her Alfa Romeo somersaulted through the air and crashed into the grandstand, killing four race fans and injuring more than thirty others. Nice was thrown from the car and landed on a soldier who absorbed the full impact of her body, saving her life. The force of the impact killed the soldier and because she lay unconscious, she too was thought to be dead. However, taken to hospital, she awoke from a coma three days later and after two months convalescing was discharged from the hospital. The tragedy turned her into a national hero amongst the Brazilian population. A large number of families even began naming their children Helenice or Elenice after her. Although Nice never spoke about it publicly, the Brazilian race accident had a profound impact and the memory of the events haunted her for the rest of her life.
11043_hn2

Comeback
In 1937, Nice attempted a racing comeback, hoping to compete in the Mille Miglia and at the Tripoli Grand Prix, which offered a very substantial cash prize. However, she was unable to get the necessary backing and instead participated in the "Yacco" endurance trials for female drivers at the Montlhéry racetrack in France. There, alternating with four other women, Nice drove for ten days and ten nights breaking ten records that still stand to this day. For the next two years, she competed in rally racing while hoping to re-join the Bugatti team. However, in August 1939, her friend Jean Bugatti was killed while testing a company vehicle and a month later, racing in Europe came to a halt with the onset of World War II.

In 1943, in the middle of the German occupation of France, she moved to the warm climate of the French Riviera and acquired a home in the city of Nice where she lived with one of her lovers for the remainder of the war.
11043_hn3

Accusations
In 1949, the first Monte Carlo Rally after the war took place in nearby Monaco and Nice was there to take part. At a large party organized to celebrate the return to racing, Louis Chiron, a multiple Grand Prix champion and Monaco’s favorite son, suddenly strode across the room and in a loud voice laced into Hellé Nice, accusing her of being a Gestapo agent during the war. At the time, such an accusation could be a serious setback for anyone’s career, but coming from someone as powerful as Chiron, even though he provided no proof, it spelled the end of Nice’s racing career.

Dropped by her sponsors, she never raced again and because of the accusation, her name and great accomplishments were virtually obliterated from the annals of racing history. Ostracized by friends and acquaintances, her lover soon abandoned her. With him went a great deal of her money and quickly the meager funds she had left deteriorated to the point where she was forced to accept charity from a Paris organization that had been established to give a bit of help to former theatre performers who had fallen on hard times.
11043_hn7

Further
No facts on Chiron’s accusation ever came to light and recent research by Miranda Seymour, author of Nice’s biography published in 2004, could find nothing to substantiate such a charge. A respected biographer, Seymour went so far as to check the official records in Berlin and was advised by the German authorities Nice had never been an agent. Ironically, Chiron himself, led by the lure of a superior car, had driven for the Mercedes-Benz team, which the Nazis were using as an object of propaganda for their philosophy of racial superiority, at a time when his Jewish colleague and rival René Dreyfus could not.

Final years
One of the 20th Century’s most colourful and illustrious pioneering women who had successfully competed in more than seventy events at the highest echelon of automobile racing, spent her final years in a sordid rat-infested apartment in the back alleys of the city of Nice, living under a fictitious name to hide her shame. Estranged from her family for years, she died penniless, friendless, and completely forgotten by the rich and glamorous crowd involved in Grand Prix motor racing. Her cremation was paid for by the Parisian charity organization that had helped her, and the ashes were sent back to her sister in the village of Sainte-Mesme near her birthplace and where her parents were buried. Nevertheless, Nice is not mentioned on the family’s cemetery memorial. Text from Wikipedia 

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11042_200gt
Toyota 2000GT used in the James Bond film,You Only Live Twice” in the museum of Toyota of Aichi Prefecture in Japan.

The Toyota 2000GT is a limited-production, front-engine, rear-wheel drive, two-seat, hardtop coupé grand tourer designed by Toyota in collaboration with Yamaha. First displayed to the public at the Tokyo Motor Show in 1965, the 2000GT was manufactured under contract by Yamaha between 1967 and 1970.

The 2000GT revolutionized the automotive world’s view of Japan. The 2000GT demonstrated that Japanese auto manufacturers could produce a sports car to rival those of Europe, in contrast to Japan’s image at the time as a producer of imitative and stodgily practical vehicles. Reviewing a pre-production 2000GT in 1967, Road & Track magazine summed up the car as "one of the most exciting and enjoyable cars we’ve driven", and compared it favourably to the Porsche 911. Today, the 2000GT is seen as the first seriously collectible Japanese car and the first "Japanese supercar". Examples of the 2000GT have sold at auction for as much as US$375,000.
Text & image from Wikipedia

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11038_v400
The Vespa 400 is a rear-engined micro car, produced by ACMA (Ateliers de construction de motocycles et d’automobiles) in Fourchambault, France, from 1957 to 1961 to the designs of the Italian Piaggio company. Two different versions were sold, "Lusso" and "Turismo".

The car is basically a two seater with room behind the seats to accommodate two small children on an optional cushion or luggage. The front seats are simple tubular metal frames with cloth upholstery on elastic "springs" and between the seats is the handbrake, starter and choke. The gear change is centrally floor mounted. The rear hinged doors have, on the inside, only a plastic lining on the metal skin allowing valuable extra internal space. Instrumentation is very basic with only a speedometer and warning lights for low fuel, main beam, dynamo charging and indicators. The cabriolet fabric roof can be rolled back from the windscreen header rail to the top of the rear engine cover leaving conventional metal sides above the doors. The 12 volt battery is located at the front of the car on a shelf that can be slid out and the spare wheel is in a well under the passenger seat. Text from Wikipedia 

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11034_rom

Rometsch Karrosserie in Berlin was much more than just the VW-based cars designed by Johannes Beeskow. Before the war, Rometsch built wonderful and expensive cars on a variety of chassis and drivetrains and sold them to some selcted wealthy Germans. In paralell with the VW Beeskow-model, Rometsch designed and built a Volkswagen Type 1 taxi with 3 doors. A stretched Beetle that sold to taxi operators in Germany.

  Read more at.Rometsch-Registry
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Article from Mechanix Illustrated July 1960. Found on blog.modernmechanix.com 11026_mopetta3

11026_mopetta1
London Busses does not intimidate Mopetta driver; He feels sassy and manoeuvrable.

11026_mopetta4

Scooter controls and 100 mpg fuel consumption characterize tiny German car.

 

11026_mopetta2
Parking with a small car is easier when you can lift the whole car into a tight spot.

11026_mopetta5

Transparent cover provides weather protection and visibility. Non-automatic.

This very small car may qualify better, to some minds, as a scooter with a body, or perhaps as a deficient power mower. You steer it with a handlebar and you start it by pulling a cord. “It roars into life with a pull of a cord,” is the way our London informant puts it—and from now on we greet anything he tells us with hurt distrust. It’s called the Brutsch Mopetta, it has three wheels, costs $560 and has a top speed of 21 mph. Its obvious role is in home-to-station and city driving.

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11023_teardrop

Call ‘em streamliners, call ‘em teardroppers, these slick, rear-engined, home-built specials of the 1930s never fail to catch my eye, and Geoff Hacker‘s forwarded me some information on yet another one – the Riley teardrop.

Geoff notes that his friend Scott Miller actually found this one, buried in the pages of Dan Iandola’s George Riley Racing Scrapbook. As Iandola wrote, taking information from the back of the one known photo, the Riley teardrop was designed by “Miehl,” and built for the Young Advertising Co. at a cost of $2,500:

Body and fenders by Libby Body Works. Motor assembled by Sloans Automotive Service. The above are all local, Kansas City Mo. The motor is Model “A” set in the rear, using a Riley valve in head. Front and rear end assemblies, and steering assemblies are all standard Model “A”. the brakes are hydraulic. the engine is cooled at high speed by forced draft, and by blower at low speeds. The body and fenders are all aluminium. A Radio Sound system and 110 volt generator is also featured. Rear vision is by periscope and side view mirror. The car is painted a medium blue. the wheels and tires are by the Major-General Tire Co.

We’re going to assume Owens-Young used so many Model A parts and a Model A-based four-cylinder rather than a flathead Ford V-8 because they had this built before 1932; otherwise, there appears to be no build date attached to the teardropper. I’ve yet to come across any mention of a coachbuilder named Libby or of a designer named Miehl, but the possible location of the photograph, the General Tire and Rubber Company at 1500 Baltimore Avenue, appears to still be standing as the Hanna Rubber Company.

Image found at:
Rat-Rods-Rule!!!
Text found at:
Hemmings-blog
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babes_and_cars_006

Another Picasa gallery full of cars and babes, here represented by the lovely Anita Ekberg and her DKW (lovingly called Das kleine Widunder, “the little wonder” in Germany). The gallery spams from automobiles childhood and well into the late sixties.

  To the gallery:The-Gallery

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camping_105

Another of my collections of images on Picasa. Camping memories this time and in both colour and black’n’white as the last one. My family often went on camping trips when I was a small kid, so I hope you’ll enjoy these images as much as I do.

  To the gallery:The-Gallery

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From the Norwegian magazine “NÅ” – No 17, April 25th 1959

Modern warfare is all about efficiency. It makes no difference if a troop is airborne if it can’t move fast on the ground as well. In order to reach this goal, the English has build a car they call the Harrier. The following pictures show you h0w it works.

11003_jitbc1

This is what it looks like when dropped from a plane. A box that takes up very little room and weights about 300 kg.

Just like a gigantic folding camera the car unfolds. Here it looks more than anything like a felt canon, but we’re not finished yet.

  11003_jitbc2
11003_jitbc3  

A four seater of the simplest sort is now revealed. Small but roomy enough. Light but still very robust. And most of all, it posts no sort of transportation problem for the army.

Ready – Go. The last technical wonder sets off. The Harrier is being tested for the moment and some changes may follow, but the main structure will be kept for sure.

  11003_jitbc4

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