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Posts Tagged ‘Retro’

Here’s the King of Bling back in the early days when playing the piano was quite enough for his exhibitionist extravaganza. Video found on RetroYouTube, a site full of delightfully old videos, everything from classic Disney and ads to movie trailers and music videos.

  Retro-YouTube

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Travelling Posters

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I’ve just upploaded my travelling poster collection to Picasa. 310+ images sorted in four different categories. Places, People, Seasons & Transportation. 

Travelling Posters  – Places
Travelling Posters – People
Travelling Posters – Seasons
Travelling Posters – Transportation

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Lost Splendor

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The findings/rambling of a collage student,  New Yorker and russophile who is chasing nostalgia – enjoy.   Lost Splendor

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01478_lady 
In the owners own words: Capturing all the things that I love and appreciate and all the visual eye candy  that inspires and motivates me……although I am totally captivated by all things French and vintage, this blog will be more about my bohemian side and all that visually stimulates my art…….

Gypsy Purple loves

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01458_hist

Historiful is dedicated to all things historical. Articles, pictures, and tidbits from the past can be found here.  Historiful focuses primarily on the early twentieth century (1900-c.1940), with regard to film and theatre, gender roles and etiquette, art, and popular fashions. Other periods, especially with regard to artistic trends, are sometimes explored.

Worth a visit. Go there!

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0044_kitch 
I found this wonderful ad at “Kitchen Retro” a marvelous blog that in their own words provides:”A little something kitsch and retro, every day!” And their making a good job of it. Just check out for yourself


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0025_clipper_01 
Hitler’s armies marching across Europe had not put a stop to the dream of commercial trans-Atlantic air traffic. The idea was not new, but Germany and the Allied had other things on their mind, so it was no surprise to any one that the Americans was the first open up a route.

It took Yankee Clipper, seen on the intro picture above, 24 hours to cross the Atlantic from Port Washington to Southampton and from London to New York. At first the flight was done once weekly, later four times a week. A sister plane, the California Clipper had already started on a route across the Pacific to the far East.

Every thing was done to see to the passengers comfort. Soft boiled eggs were boiled for 12 minutes in the altitude the Yankee Clipper usually cruised in. The cook had checked that during the last test flights before the plane entered regular traffic.

The parachutes are brought on board, each bag contains 10. Over open sea, which means most of the journey these may have provided a meagre comfort, but they were the lifebelts of the flying "ship"s in those days.
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Here is a view of one of Yankee Clipper’s two bathrooms, there were one for ladies and one for gentlemen. Your hand would shake only slightly should you happen to shave as the aeroplane cruised along doing 300 kilometres an hour, 6000 feet above the ground.
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The stairs between first and second deck in Yankee Clipper was the first ever built in an aeroplane. Elevators, like the ones they had on the big steamers was not thought necessary, may be because the second deck was only used by the crew. The passenger’s cabins were all on the  first deck.
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The captains cabin was
provided with the finest
navigation instruments
the world had to offer at
that point in time.

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Yankee Clipper could take 50 passengers and had a crew of 22.
The salon on the first deck provided comfortable seats and a spacious midsection. Several windows gave a view of the sea and the clouds.

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During the night the seats in the passenger’s cabins converted into beds, just like in a train cabin.

This piece on the Yankee Clipper is based on an article dating from June 10th 1939 featured in a Norwegian magazine called "Bilder".

The magazine was not regarded as nazi friendly enough to survive the German occupation during WWII  -Ted


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