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Grapette is a grape-flavored soft drink that was first produced and marketed in 1939 by Benjamin "Tyndle" Fooks. Grapette is now produced by Grapette International, and is marketed in the United States by Wal-Mart as part of its Sam’s Choice line of soft drinks.

Development

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Grapette was developed by Benjamin "Tyndle" Fooks when, while working as a traveling salesman selling a product known as "Fooks Flavors", he noticed the popularity of his grape flavor. From this, Fooks, dissatisfied with existing grape a12119_grapette_03sodas on the market, sought to develop a grape soda that tasted the way he believed that a grape soda should taste. Over the course of two years and tens of thousands of taste tests, by 1939, he had developed a flavor that he believed was superior to all other grape sodas available at the time.

To name the drink, Fooks turned to Hubert Owen. Owen and an assistant ran a local contest to come up with a name, but this failed to produce a suitable name. Owen then traveled to Washington, D.C. in 1939 to search the trademark files of the United States Patent Office for a suitable name. Here, it was found that a man named Rube Goldstein owned a trademark for the name "Grapette", "Orangette", and "Lemonette". Further research determined that Goldstein owned a small bottling firm that produced a drink that used one of Fooks’ grape flavors, called "Tiny", which it distributed in Virginia and North Carolina, marketed in a six-ounce bottle. Goldstein, however, had never used the a12119_grapette_04Grapette, Orangette, or Lemonette names. In March 1940, Fooks and Owen traveled to Chicago, Illinois to meet with Goldstein. There, they purchased the Grapette, Orangette, and Lemonette names for $500.

Grapette’s first-year sales were quite promising. This was due to Grapette’s flavor, as well as Grapette’s unique packaging. Most soft drinks at the time were sold in twelve-ounce bottles. Grapette was sold in a six-ounce clear glass bottle, which served to show off the beverage’s purple color. With the success in sales, marketing of Grapette was expanded to much of the United States, and the slogan "Thirsty or Not" was developed for use in advertising. In addition, other flavors were developed, such as Orangette, an orange-flavored soda that used a considerable amount of real orange juice, and Lemonette, which contained a large amount of real lemon juice.

Early marketing

In the spring of 1940, Fooks began marketing his soda in Camden, Arkansas under the name "Grapette"

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When World War II began, Fooks dropped many of his other brands, such as Botl-O and Sunburst, in order to focus on Grapette. Sales of Grapette continued to soar during the war, despite restrictions and material shortages. Sugar, which was subject to wartime rationing, was obtained by adding water to granulated sugar, thus liquefying it, enabling it to be sold as syrup, which was not subject to rationing.

a12119_grapette_06In 1942, R. Paul May, an Arkansas oil tycoon, persuaded Fooks to allow him to market Grapette in Latin America, citing a lack of soft drink options in the area. May was able to build a good reputation for Grapette in Guatemala, selling not only Grapette, but also Orangette and Lemonette. These brands soon became market leaders. In 1962, the export division of Grapette was reorganized into a separate company, known as Grapette International.

In 1962, Grapette introduced a line of cola drinks to compete with Coca-Cola under the name of "Mr. Cola". The drink was popular in large part because of its sixteen-ounce bottle. Mr. Cola was also available in ten and twelve-ounce sizes. In 1963, "Lymette" was added to Grapette’s family of brands. Lymette, however, never achieved the commercial success of the other brands.

Decline and retirement

a12119_grapette_07By the 1960s, Fooks believed that he had reached his limit with Grapette, and was ready to move on. By the end of the decade, Fooks had begun talks with groups interested in purchasing Grapette. Fooks ultimately sold Grapette to the Rheingold Corporation in 1970, which marketed the Rheingold, Ruppert-Knickerbocker, and Gablinger’s lines of beers, as well as several regional brands of soft drinks in California, New Mexico, and Puerto Rico. Rheingold changed the name of the company from Grapette to Flavette, and relocated the company headquarters to Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Grapette’s bottle was changed to one with smooth sides and colored dots. The slogan became "The Juicy Soda". Grapette’s advertising model also changed. Previously, advertising was funded by a surcharge on sugar, which was to be spent by the distributor for advertising only. This plan was dropped by Rheingold, placing advertising solely in the hands of Grapette’s distributors, resulting in an immediate drop in sales. During this period, Flavette purchased the Dr. Wells soda pop brand and Mason & Mason, Inc., the makers of Mason’s Root Beer.

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In 1975, Rheingold was purchased by PepsiCo, Inc. in a hostile takeover, acquiring 80% of the company’s stock. However, the Federal Trade Commission determined that PepsiCo controlled too many soft drink companies, and thus ordered that PepsiCo divest several prominent brands. When the divestiture was complete in 1977, Grapette was in the hands of The Monarch Beverage Company, which manufactured NuGrape. As Monarch already manufactured a grape soda, it was determined that they did not need a second. Representatives from Monarch flew to Grapette’s headquarters and essentially fired the Grapette team. As such, the Grapette name was shelved, and the flavor was retired in the United States.

a12119_grapette_10Despite the brand’s retirement in the United States, May retained ownership of Grapette International, and Grapette was still produced internationally, remaining a popular drink. When May died in the early 1970s, control of Grapette International was passed on to May’s son-in-law, Brooks Rice.

In the United States, Grapette may have been gone, but it certainly had not been forgotten. Rice had made many offers to buy the American rights to Grapette back from Monarch, but regardless of the amount of money offered, Monarch refused to sell the name. Despite this setback, Rice continued to grow Grapette’s market share elsewhere in the world, with sales in the tens of millions in countries in South America and the Pacific Rim.

Wal-Mart

Rice had profited by becoming an early investor in a business called Wal-Mart, founded by Sam Walton. Over time, as Wal-Mart grew into a household name, Rice began thinking of ways to partner with Wal-Mart. In 1986, Rice was able to meet with Sam Walton, in order to discuss creating a line of private label soft drinks for Wal-Mart. He was specifically interested in making a grape soda for Wal-Mart. Walton did not waste words in telling Rice what he wanted: "I want Grapette in my stores." While Rice did not have the American rights to the Grapette name, he was able to offer Grapette’s flavor, and also promised that if he was able to reacquire the rights for the Grapette name, Wal-Mart could have it.

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Ozark Farms

In 1989, nearly three years after the initial meeting, Grapette International began producing a line of soft drinks for Wal-Mart under the Ozark Farms name. The flavors available were cola, lemon-lime, grape, and orange. Each flavor used Fooks’ original formulas. Thus Grapette had returned to American shelves, albeit under a new name. However, sales were disappointing, and the Ozark Farms line of soft drinks was discontinued.

Sam’s Choice

When Sam Walton died in 1992, Wal-Mart CEO David Glass felt it would be a fitting tribute to Walton to rename Wal-Mart’s private label as "Sam’s Choice". In 1993, Rice again began manufacturing soft drinks for Wal-Mart, this time under the Sam’s Choice brand. Wal-Mart was given exclusive rights to the flavors in the United States. Grapette was relaunched at this time as well, under the name "Sam’s Choice Grape". Sam’s Choice Grape soon became one of the best-selling grape sodas in the nation, seemingly proving Rice’s claim that the flavor was what had made Grapette so a12119_grapette_09popular, and not the drink’s famous name.

Revival of Grapette name

In 2000, Rice walked into the Wal-Mart Home Office in Bentonville, Arkansas, in order to personally deliver the news to David Glass: Monarch was finally selling the Grapette name. Rice told Glass, "This is a tribute to you and Sam for having the vision on this product."

By late 2004, the Grapette and Orangette names (and original logotypes) had been incorporated into the Sam’s Choice line of soft drinks, and had completely replaced the Sam’s Choice Grape and Sam’s Choice Orange brands in Wal-Mart stores.

Text from Wikipedia

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Sidral Mundet is a Mexican apple-flavored carbonated soft drink produced by FEMSA S.A de C.V and distributed in the United States by the Novamex company, which also distributes the Jarritos and Sangria Señorial soda brands.

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History

Sidral Mundet was first bottled in 1902 by Don Arturo Mundet, who produced the cider-flavored beverage. Basing Sidral Mundet on the "limonada" or "gaseosa" drinks that were popular in Mexico at the turn of the 20th Century, he utilized the pasteurization technique to keep the drink sterile in the bottling process. The drink has been renowned in Mexico for its nourishing and hydrating abilities and has sometimes been used as a home remedy for stomach aches.

In 1988, Sidral Mundet was introduced to the US through Novamex and has since become a popular soft drink in the Hispanic American market.

Varieties

Sidral Mundet is available in three flavors: red apple, green apple and yellow apple.

Text from Wikipedia 

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I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

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These days when most of us reach for a soda on the supermarket shelf our options are limited to a few international brands that have cornered the market. And when we do grab it, it will most likely be in the form of a plastic bottle or aluminum can. But in the early 20th century, the business of soda, like many others, was a local enterprise.

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In 1900 two brothers, recent immigrants from Italy, founded a soda and beer bottling plant at 812-14 Washington Avenue. The business went through several product and name changes, often taking on a different name every time there was a new product, according to Robert Esposito, the grandson of James “Giacomo” Esposito, one of the brothers.

primo_gassosa_003bThe name that is most likely to ring a bell these days is probably its last one: “Primo Gassosa,” an Italian name meaning “First (or first best) Gas Soda.” The soda was popular for many years. Some claim that it’s cola and lemon-lime flavors rivaled Coca-Cola and 7up. However, the changing of the times, the transition from re-usable glass bottles to disposable plastic ones, and shifts from small stores to giant supermarkets, made it too difficult to continue. However, James Esposito’s grandson Robert, and great-grandson Alexander have taken on the historical documentation and research of the family soda business as a labor of love. That Alexander Esposito is a private investigator no doubt helps when unearthing artifacts such as the unopened case of Primo Gassosa he found in a South Philadelphia supermarket basement years ago.

Text found at: philaplace.org/



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I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

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Fanta – The Humble Beginnings Of  A Worldwide Phenomenon

456_fanta_03There have been all kinds of stories about Fanta’s creation in Nazi Germany during WWII. Some of what has been said is true— a great deal is fiction.

Prior to the breakout of the war, Germany was the location of The Coca-Cola Company’s greatest overseas success. Records for sales were set year after year. By 1939, there were 43 bottling plants and more than 600 local distributors.

The German branch of The Coca-Cola Company had been run by an American-born man by the name of Ray Powers. He was killed in a car accident in 1938 and was replaced by the German-born Max Keith. As the new CEO, Keith was entrusted with all the operations for The Coca-Cola Company in all the occupied countries.

During the war, Keith was able to maintain a degree of contact with the Atlanta-based headquarters of The Coca-Cola Company via Switzerland. But by 1941 he was no longer able to receive Coca-Cola syrup, and was therefore unable to continue to manufacture Coca-Cola.

456_fanta_01Keith’s solution to the ingredient shortage was to invent a new drink. It was made from what was available at the time, namely things left over from other food industries. There was whey, which was a byproduct of cheese production and apple fiber left over from cider presses. A variety of other fruit byproducts were added depending on what was available at the time. This led to the many variations in flavor that later became the different marketed flavors of Fanta. This new soft drink was sweetened with beet sugar. As CEO, Keith held a contest to name his new creation. He instructed his employees to let their “Fantasie”—German for “imaginations”—run wild. A salesman, Joe Knipp immediately blurted out “Fanta”!

456_fanta_06The new soft drink was not only successful enough to keep the bottling plants open and the people employed for the duration of the war, but enabled Fanta to become a soft drink favorite in Europe. In 1943 there were 3 million cases of Fanta sold in Germany and the occupied countries. Evidently, not all of that quantity was purchased to drink as a refreshing soft drink, but may have been used to flavor soups and stews, due to sugar rationing.

456_fanta_04Max Keith was not a Nazi, and never became one, as has been rumored. Although he suffered hardships as a result of his decision, he never gave into pressure to join the Nazi Party. With the success of Fanta, Keith was able to safeguard The Coca-Cola Company’s interests in Europe until after the war, when they were able to re-establish drink production almost immediately.

The Coca-Cola Company acquired the rights to Fanta in 1960. Today, Fanta is sold in the highest volume in Brazil, Germany, Spain, Japan, Italy and Argentina. Fanta was originally created in an orange flavor that now accounts for 70% of all Fanta sales.

 

Fanta is sold in 188 countries and is available in 70 flavors, although some flavors are only available in the country where they are manufactured. Fanta is the number one soft drink in Thailand, and a new flavor was just launched in Japan—Fanta Japanese Melon.

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Text from RetroPlanet



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I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

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lemon_and_ paeroa_005Lemon & Paeroa, also known as L&P, is a sweet soft drink manufactured in New Zealand. Traditionally made by combining lemon juice with carbonated mineral water from the town of Paeroa, it is now manufactured by multi-national Coca-Cola.

Lemon & Paeroa can be found only in New Zealand and in specialty New Zealand stores abroad. The comically pretentious advertising slogan "World famous in New Zealand" has become a popular New Zealand saying, meaning that if the premise of ‘New Zealand is the only nation of the world’ is true, then the drink would indeed be world famous. The comic effect arises from the need for such an outrageous premise, for such a petty claim to fame.

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Over the years attempts have been made to market variations, such as L&P dry. In 2005 "Sweet As L&P" with artificial sweetener aspartame was introduced with the modified slogan "World Famous in New Zealand since quite recently", the traditional product now being advertised as "World Famous in New Zealand since AGES ago".

lemon_and_ paeroa_003L&P is also often used as a mixer in New Zealand bars, particularly with Southern Comfort.

Although L&P itself is now made on the same production line as Coke’s other beverages, an L&P Kiwiana shop and café remains in Paeroa.

Analysis of Paeroa mineral water by Arthur Wohlman in 1904 revealed magnesium bicarbonate in a concentration of 73 grains to the gallon (1040 mg/L). In 1908 the property containing the mineral spring was purchased by Robert Fewell and his brother-in-law Frank Brinkler. Their company Paeroa Natural Mineral Water Company, bottled the spring water until 1915 when they sold the company to Menzies and Company who, in turn, opened a new factory in Paeroa in 1926. In the late 1940s lemon_and_ paeroa_001‘Lemon and Paeroa’ and ‘Paeroa and Lemon’ were both marketed. In 1963 Menzies and Co merged with Hamilton based bottlers CL Innes, and L&P took on the Innes Tartan as a motif on the neck of the L&P bottle. This continued until the late 1970s, when L&P was taken over by Oasis Industries, before it was, in turn, taken over by Coca Cola.

In the late 1980s, a collaboration of New Zealand music artists recorded a cover of Martha and the Vandellas song (Love is Like A) Heat Wave, to promote the drink.

In mid 2013 Whittaker’s chocolate released a new product in collaboration with L&P. Lunched with the tongue in cheek advertisement of a Whittaker’s delivery van sporting the brand’s iconic logo was ‘crashed’ into the iconic L&P bottle statue in Paeroa. Whittaker’s L&P chocolate is made of Whittaker’s 28% cocoa white chocolate infused with the essence of L&P and bursting with popping candy to give it real fizz.

Text from Wikipedia 



Help Needed
I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

List of Soft drinks and sodas posted already
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fresca_004Fresca is a diet citrus soft drink made by The Coca-Cola Company. First introduced in the United States in 1966, the drink is now sold throughout the American continent. Fresca means "fresh" (feminine form) in Portuguese, Spanish and Italian.

fresca_003Since its introduction in 1966, Fresca has been marketed in the United States as a calorie-free, grapefruit-flavored soft drink, ostensibly catering to discriminating adult tastes. In ads it was described as an "imitation, citrus-flavored, artificially sweetened dietary beverage". Fresca underwent several major ingredient changes since its introduction. The drink was originally sweetened with cyclamates, which were banned by the FDA in 1969, and the banned ingredient was replaced with saccharin. However, in 1985, the saccharin was replaced by NutraSweet-brand aspartame. More recently, around the time of the 2005 redesign, acesulfame potassium was added as a secondary sweetener.

fresca_007American President Lyndon B. Johnson had a soda fountain containing Fresca installed in the Oval Office.

In Latin America, Coca-Cola markets an entirely different soft drink under the Fresca brand name. This drink is grapefruit-flavored, but contains sugar. Colombia and Argentina are the only countries in which this drink is distributed with the name Quatro using Fresca’s same colors, logos and stickers.

fresca_006Fresca was made available in South Africa during the early 1990s with a series of colourful ads featuring Hakeem Kae-Kazim with the slogan, "Nothing tastes like Fresca." The soft drink developed a cult following but sales were discontinued.

Fresca belongs to the family of citrus-flavored sodas. It is similar to Dr Pepper‘s Squirt. In 1997 Coca-Cola, which had requests for "Mexican Fresca" from immigrant communities, launched the soft drink throughout the U.S. as Citra. However this was not successful as a separate product line, and that drink is now sold as the Citrus flavor in The Coca-Cola Company’s Fanta line in areas with large Hispanic populations.

fresca_001Fresca has so far managed to defend its niche of the market, and, like Tab, can rely on a relatively small but loyal customer base.

Fresca packaging has been redesigned several times, although advertising continues to emphasize sophistication. In 2005, Coca-Cola gave Fresca a more contemporary look, Fresca’s first makeover since 1995. During this redesign, two new flavors were introduced (Sparkling Peach Citrus and Sparkling Black Cherry Citrus) and the originalgrapefruit flavor was renamed Sparkling Citrus. Later, "Sparkling" was dropped and the original flavor was renamed Original Citrus. Several additional flavors have been added to the line-up since 2005.



Help Needed
I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

List of Soft drinks and sodas posted already
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Guaraná is a guaraná-flavoured soft drink, originating in Brazil and manufactured and distributed by Anheuser-Busch In Bev. It was created in 1921 by Pedro Baptista de Andrade for Companhia Antarctica Paulista, now part of Anheuser-Busch InBev. The drink is produced only in three countries (Portugal, Brazil, and Japan). It is the second best-selling soft drink brand in Brazil, behind only Coca-Cola, an absolute leader in its segment. Currently, it is one of the 15 best-selling soft drink brands in the world.

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guarana_007It is the most popular guaraná-flavoured soft drink in Brazil, where it is also available as the low calorie version Guaraná Antarctica Zero. Another brand of guaraná-flavoured drinks is Kuat!, which is produced by The Coca-Cola Company and in Brazil is sold through McDonald’s restaurants and some supermarkets.

Guaraná Antarctica is also available in Portugal, Spain, Honduras, Paraguay, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, Israel, Italy, Switzerland, Finland, Canada, United Kingdom (recently in all Tesco and Waitrose stores), Sweden, parts of Japan, the United States and as 1.5 litre bottles in special food stores in Germany.

Guaraná Antarctica is the official sponsor of the Brazilian national football team. One of its 2006 commercials featured Argentine football player Diego Maradona finding himself wearing the yellow jersey of the Brazilian team and singing the Brazilian national anthem before waking up and proclaiming it was a nightmare, because he had drunk too much Guaraná the day before. This caused considerable controversy in Argentina.

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guarana_006aAnother controversial commercial from Guaraná Antarctica was a TV spot showing the guaraná berry plantations in the Amazon region while a narrator explained the basics of the process of producing Guaraná Antarctica and introduced the audience to the guaraná tree. By the end of the spot the narrator turns to the audience and says: "Now ask Coca-Cola to show you the coca tree…", a direct attack on Coca-Cola.

Being high in caffeine, the drink has made inroads in the U.S. as a result of the energy drinks craze. Six-packs are sold in most major cities, though they can be difficult to find. The taste is mild, slightly apple-like, with a distinct berry after-flavour. Several websites sell guaraná to Americans. Guaraná Antarctica is by far the most popular form of the drink.



Help Needed
I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

List of Soft drinks and sodas posted already
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