Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Popular music’ Category

791_lavere_baker_01

Delores LaVern Baker (November 11, 1929 – March 10, 1997) was an American rhythm and blues singer, who had several hit records on the pop chart in the 1950s and early 1960s. Her most successful records were "Tweedlee Dee" (1955), "Jim Dandy" (1956), and "I Cried a Tear" (1958).

Career

791_lavere_baker_02She began singing in Chicago clubs such as the Club DeLisa around 1946, often billed as Little Miss Sharecropper, and first recorded under that name in 1949. She changed her name briefly to Bea Baker when recording for Okeh Records in 1951, and then became LaVern Baker when singing with Todd Rhodes and his band in 1952.

In 1953 she signed for Atlantic Records as a solo artist, her first release being "Soul on Fire". Her first hit came in early 1955, with the Latin-tempo "Tweedlee Dee" reaching #4 on the R&B chart and #14 on the national US pop charts.Georgia Gibbs‘ note-for-note cover of Baker’s "Tweedle Dee" reached #1; subsequently Baker made an unsuccessful attempt to sue her and petitioned Congress to consider such covers copyright violations.

791_lavere_baker_03Baker had a succession of hits on the R&B charts over the next couple of years with her backing group The Gliders, including "Bop-Ting-A-Ling" (#3 R&B), "Play It Fair" (#2 R&B), and "Still" (#4 R&B). At the end of 1956 she had another smash hit with "Jim Dandy" (#1 R&B, #17 pop). It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. Further hits followed for Atlantic, including the follow-up "Jim Dandy Got Married" (#7 R&B), "I Cried a Tear" (#2 R&B, #6 pop in 1959), "I Waited Too Long" (#5 R&B, #3 pop, written by Neil Sedaka), "Saved" (#17 R&B, written by Leiber and Stoller), and "See See Rider" (#9 R&B in 1963).

In addition to singing, Baker also did some work with Ed Sullivan and Alan Freed on TV and in films, including Rock, Rock, Rock and Mr. Rock & Roll. In 1964, she recorded a Bessie Smith tribute album, before leaving Atlantic and joining Brunswick Records, where she recorded the album "Let Me Belong to You".

In 1966, Baker recorded a duet single with Jackie Wilson. The controversial song, "Think Twice", featured raunchy lyrics that were not considered appropriate for airplay at that time or even today. Three versions were recorded, one of which is the X-rated version with the raunchy lyrics.

In the late 1960s, Baker became seriously ill after a trip to Vietnam to entertain American soldiers. While recovering at the US Subic Bay Naval Base in the Philippines, her husband, Slappy White filed for a divorce. A friend recommended that she stay on as the entertainment director at the Marine Corps Staff NCO club there, and she remained there for 22 years.

In 1988 she returned to perform at Madison Square Garden for Atlantic Records’ 40th anniversary. She then worked on the soundtracks to films such as Shag, (1989), Dick Tracy, (1990) and A Rage in Harlem (1991), which were all issued on CD. She also performed a song on Alan Parker‘s film Angel Heart (1987), which appeared on the original vinyl soundtrack album, but was not included on the later CD issue "for contractual reasons".

In 1990, she made her Broadway debut replacing Ruth Brown as star of the hit musical Black and Blue. In 1991, Rhino Records released a new album Live in Hollywood recorded at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill, as well as a compilation of her greatest Atlantic hits entitled Soul on Fire. In 1992, she recorded a well-received studio album, Woke Up This Morning, for DRG Records. She continued performing after having both legs amputated from diabetes complications in 1994 and made her last recording, "Jump Into the Fire," for the 1995 Harry Nilsson tribute CD, For the Love of Harry on the Music Masters label.

She received the 1990 Pioneer Award from the Rhythm and Blues Foundation. In 1991, Baker became the second female solo artist inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, following Aretha Franklin in 1987. Her song "Jim Dandy" was named one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll and was ranked #343 on the Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Text from Wikipedia

Read Full Post »

Gigliola Cinquetti (Italian pronunciation: [dʒiʎˈʎɔla tʃiŋˈkwetti]; born 20 December 1947) is an Italian singer, TV presenter.

603_Gigliola Cinquetti_01603_Gigliola Cinquetti_02

Biography
Cinquetti was born in Verona, Veneto. At the age of 16 she won the Sanremo Music Festival in 1964 singing "Non ho l’età" ("I’m Not Old Enough"), with music composed by Nicola Salerno and lyrics by Mario Panzeri. Her win enabled her to represent Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1964 in Copenhagen with the same song, where she claimed her country’s first ever victory in the event. The song became an international success, even entering UK Singles Chart, traditionally unusual for Italian material. It sold over three million copies, and was awarded a platinum disc in August 1964. In 1966, she recorded "Dio, come ti amo" ("God, How I Love You"), which became another worldwide hit.

603_Gigliola Cinquetti_03603_Gigliola Cinquetti_08603_Gigliola Cinquetti_09

In 1974 Gigliola Cinquetti entered the Eurovision Song Contest again, this time held in Brighton, Sussex, England. The song was called "Sí" (which became quite controversial in Italy at the time, with the impending divorce referendum in the offing), and came second to Swedish foursome ABBA with their song "Waterloo". Gigliola Cinquetti scored an even bigger UK hit single than she had ten years earlier, with "Sí" peaking at No. 8

Text from Wikipedia 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

536_Julie Driscol_01Julie Tippetts (born Julie Driscoll, 8 June 1947, London, England) is an English singer and actress, known for her 1960s versions of Bob Dylan‘s "This Wheel’s on Fire", and Donovan‘s "Season of the Witch", both with Brian Auger & The Trinity. Along with The Trinity, she was featured prominently in the 1969 television special 33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee, singing "I’m a Believer" in a soul style with Micky Dolenz. She and Auger had previously worked in Steampacket, with Long John Baldry and Rod Stewart.

"This Wheel’s on Fire" reached number five in the United Kingdom in June 1968. With distortion, the imagery of the title and the group’s dress and performance, this version came to represent the psychedelic era in British music. Driscoll recorded the song again in the early ’90s with Adrian Edmondson as the theme to the BBC comedy series Absolutely Fabulous, whose main characters are throwbacks to that era.

Since the 1970s, Driscoll has concentrated on experimental vocal music, married jazz musician Keith Tippett and collaborated with him. Her name is now ‘Julie Tippetts’, thus using the original spelling of her husband’s surname. She participated in Keith Tippett’s big band 536_Julie Driscol_03Centipede and, in 1974, took part in Robert Wyatt‘s Theatre Royal Drury Lane concert; released a solo album, Sunset Glow in 1975; and was lead vocalist on Carla Bley‘s album Tropic Appetites and in John Wolf Brennan‘s "HeXtet".

Later in the 1970s, she toured with her own band, and recorded and performed as one of the vocal quartet ‘Voice’, with Maggie Nichols, Phil Minton and Brian Eley.

In the early 1980s, Julie Tippetts was a guest vocalist on an early single by pop-jazz band Working Week, on the song "Storm of Light", which brought them the attention of a wider audience. Though the band later continued with other vocalists – notably with Tracey Thorn of Everything but the Girl fame and the band’s long term staple, another Julie, last name Roberts – it was this single that marked the band’s arrival and a brief infatuation from the British and European public with stylish pop incorporating a strong jazz flavor, thus marking Julie Tippetts, née Driscoll, as a vocalist for every age.

cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Wheels On Fire
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open 
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues 
cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Road To Cairo
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues
cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Season Of The Witch 
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues

I apologise for the sound quality on this record, but I’ve had it since 1967 – Ted 😉

Text from Wikipedia

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The Seventies.

The The Seventies article is HERE

This, the 11th part of the “Popular Music History 1945 – 1980” series, is the last one. A new sort of serial posts will probably start next Saturday – Ted 😉

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

Here’s the Punk article

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

Here’s the Reggae article

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

Here’s the ‘Dylan and after’ article

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: