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Delores LaVern Baker (November 11, 1929 – March 10, 1997) was an American rhythm and blues singer, who had several hit records on the pop chart in the 1950s and early 1960s. Her most successful records were "Tweedlee Dee" (1955), "Jim Dandy" (1956), and "I Cried a Tear" (1958).

Career

791_lavere_baker_02She began singing in Chicago clubs such as the Club DeLisa around 1946, often billed as Little Miss Sharecropper, and first recorded under that name in 1949. She changed her name briefly to Bea Baker when recording for Okeh Records in 1951, and then became LaVern Baker when singing with Todd Rhodes and his band in 1952.

In 1953 she signed for Atlantic Records as a solo artist, her first release being "Soul on Fire". Her first hit came in early 1955, with the Latin-tempo "Tweedlee Dee" reaching #4 on the R&B chart and #14 on the national US pop charts.Georgia Gibbs‘ note-for-note cover of Baker’s "Tweedle Dee" reached #1; subsequently Baker made an unsuccessful attempt to sue her and petitioned Congress to consider such covers copyright violations.

791_lavere_baker_03Baker had a succession of hits on the R&B charts over the next couple of years with her backing group The Gliders, including "Bop-Ting-A-Ling" (#3 R&B), "Play It Fair" (#2 R&B), and "Still" (#4 R&B). At the end of 1956 she had another smash hit with "Jim Dandy" (#1 R&B, #17 pop). It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. Further hits followed for Atlantic, including the follow-up "Jim Dandy Got Married" (#7 R&B), "I Cried a Tear" (#2 R&B, #6 pop in 1959), "I Waited Too Long" (#5 R&B, #3 pop, written by Neil Sedaka), "Saved" (#17 R&B, written by Leiber and Stoller), and "See See Rider" (#9 R&B in 1963).

In addition to singing, Baker also did some work with Ed Sullivan and Alan Freed on TV and in films, including Rock, Rock, Rock and Mr. Rock & Roll. In 1964, she recorded a Bessie Smith tribute album, before leaving Atlantic and joining Brunswick Records, where she recorded the album "Let Me Belong to You".

In 1966, Baker recorded a duet single with Jackie Wilson. The controversial song, "Think Twice", featured raunchy lyrics that were not considered appropriate for airplay at that time or even today. Three versions were recorded, one of which is the X-rated version with the raunchy lyrics.

In the late 1960s, Baker became seriously ill after a trip to Vietnam to entertain American soldiers. While recovering at the US Subic Bay Naval Base in the Philippines, her husband, Slappy White filed for a divorce. A friend recommended that she stay on as the entertainment director at the Marine Corps Staff NCO club there, and she remained there for 22 years.

In 1988 she returned to perform at Madison Square Garden for Atlantic Records’ 40th anniversary. She then worked on the soundtracks to films such as Shag, (1989), Dick Tracy, (1990) and A Rage in Harlem (1991), which were all issued on CD. She also performed a song on Alan Parker‘s film Angel Heart (1987), which appeared on the original vinyl soundtrack album, but was not included on the later CD issue "for contractual reasons".

In 1990, she made her Broadway debut replacing Ruth Brown as star of the hit musical Black and Blue. In 1991, Rhino Records released a new album Live in Hollywood recorded at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill, as well as a compilation of her greatest Atlantic hits entitled Soul on Fire. In 1992, she recorded a well-received studio album, Woke Up This Morning, for DRG Records. She continued performing after having both legs amputated from diabetes complications in 1994 and made her last recording, "Jump Into the Fire," for the 1995 Harry Nilsson tribute CD, For the Love of Harry on the Music Masters label.

She received the 1990 Pioneer Award from the Rhythm and Blues Foundation. In 1991, Baker became the second female solo artist inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, following Aretha Franklin in 1987. Her song "Jim Dandy" was named one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll and was ranked #343 on the Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Text from Wikipedia

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Gigliola Cinquetti (Italian pronunciation: [dʒiʎˈʎɔla tʃiŋˈkwetti]; born 20 December 1947) is an Italian singer, TV presenter.

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Biography
Cinquetti was born in Verona, Veneto. At the age of 16 she won the Sanremo Music Festival in 1964 singing "Non ho l’età" ("I’m Not Old Enough"), with music composed by Nicola Salerno and lyrics by Mario Panzeri. Her win enabled her to represent Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1964 in Copenhagen with the same song, where she claimed her country’s first ever victory in the event. The song became an international success, even entering UK Singles Chart, traditionally unusual for Italian material. It sold over three million copies, and was awarded a platinum disc in August 1964. In 1966, she recorded "Dio, come ti amo" ("God, How I Love You"), which became another worldwide hit.

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In 1974 Gigliola Cinquetti entered the Eurovision Song Contest again, this time held in Brighton, Sussex, England. The song was called "Sí" (which became quite controversial in Italy at the time, with the impending divorce referendum in the offing), and came second to Swedish foursome ABBA with their song "Waterloo". Gigliola Cinquetti scored an even bigger UK hit single than she had ten years earlier, with "Sí" peaking at No. 8

Text from Wikipedia 

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536_Julie Driscol_01Julie Tippetts (born Julie Driscoll, 8 June 1947, London, England) is an English singer and actress, known for her 1960s versions of Bob Dylan‘s "This Wheel’s on Fire", and Donovan‘s "Season of the Witch", both with Brian Auger & The Trinity. Along with The Trinity, she was featured prominently in the 1969 television special 33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee, singing "I’m a Believer" in a soul style with Micky Dolenz. She and Auger had previously worked in Steampacket, with Long John Baldry and Rod Stewart.

"This Wheel’s on Fire" reached number five in the United Kingdom in June 1968. With distortion, the imagery of the title and the group’s dress and performance, this version came to represent the psychedelic era in British music. Driscoll recorded the song again in the early ’90s with Adrian Edmondson as the theme to the BBC comedy series Absolutely Fabulous, whose main characters are throwbacks to that era.

Since the 1970s, Driscoll has concentrated on experimental vocal music, married jazz musician Keith Tippett and collaborated with him. Her name is now ‘Julie Tippetts’, thus using the original spelling of her husband’s surname. She participated in Keith Tippett’s big band 536_Julie Driscol_03Centipede and, in 1974, took part in Robert Wyatt‘s Theatre Royal Drury Lane concert; released a solo album, Sunset Glow in 1975; and was lead vocalist on Carla Bley‘s album Tropic Appetites and in John Wolf Brennan‘s "HeXtet".

Later in the 1970s, she toured with her own band, and recorded and performed as one of the vocal quartet ‘Voice’, with Maggie Nichols, Phil Minton and Brian Eley.

In the early 1980s, Julie Tippetts was a guest vocalist on an early single by pop-jazz band Working Week, on the song "Storm of Light", which brought them the attention of a wider audience. Though the band later continued with other vocalists – notably with Tracey Thorn of Everything but the Girl fame and the band’s long term staple, another Julie, last name Roberts – it was this single that marked the band’s arrival and a brief infatuation from the British and European public with stylish pop incorporating a strong jazz flavor, thus marking Julie Tippetts, née Driscoll, as a vocalist for every age.

cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Wheels On Fire
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open 
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues 
cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Road To Cairo
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues
cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Season Of The Witch 
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues

I apologise for the sound quality on this record, but I’ve had it since 1967 – Ted 😉

Text from Wikipedia

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intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The Seventies.

The The Seventies article is HERE

This, the 11th part of the “Popular Music History 1945 – 1980” series, is the last one. A new sort of serial posts will probably start next Saturday – Ted 😉

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intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

Here’s the Punk article

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intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

Here’s the Reggae article

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intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

Here’s the ‘Dylan and after’ article

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intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

Here’s the California Sun article

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intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The Seventies.

Here’s the British Beat article

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intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

The Country article is HERE

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315_Gabrielle Ray_01Gabrielle Ray (28 April 1883 – 21 May 1973), was an English stage actress, dancer and singer, best known for her roles in Edwardian musical comedies.

Ray was considered one of the most beautiful actresses on the London stage and became one of the most photographed women in the world. In the first decade of the 20th century, she had a good career in musical theatre. After an unsuccessful marriage, however, she never recovered the fame that she had enjoyed. She spent many of her later years in mental hospitals.

Biography
Ray was born Gabrielle Elizabeth Clifford Cook in Cheadle, Stockport, England. She was the fifth child of William Austin Cook, a prosperous iron merchant and a Justice of the Peace for Cheshire, and his wife Anne Maria Elizabeth née Holden.

315_Gabrielle Ray_02Early career
Ray first appeared in London’s West End at the age of ten in the role of Eveleen in John Hollingshead’s production of a musical play called Miami at the Royal Princess’s Theatre. This was followed by juvenile roles in a series of plays in London and on tour. The next year, she played a role in A Celebrated Case. She was also a dancer in the Blackpool ballet. At the Richmond Theatre from 1893, she played Cupid in Little Red Riding Hood, Adrienne in Proof, and Cissie in The Silver King, among other plays and pantomimes. In 1899, she appeared in Sinbad the Sailor at the Hammersmith Lyric Opera House. Manager Ben Greet noticed her dancing skills and engaged her to tour with his company. With Greet, she toured for three years in the roles of Mamie Clancy in The Belle of New York and Dolly Twinkle in The Casino Girl (1901). Ray was back at the Lyric in 1902 to play the title character in the pantomime Little Red Riding Hood.

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During the first decade of the 20th century, Ray’s career had progressed to the point where she was performing at leading West End venues and gaining attention as a beautiful young dancer and actress. Her photograph was much sought after by the various trade publications and leading photographers such BXP22740of the day. Known across Europe for her looks, she was admired by such gentlemen as Alfred Vanderbilt and the King Manuel of Portugal.

George Edwardes hired Ray to understudy Gertie Millar in The Toreador at the Gaiety Theatre, London in 1902, where she had the chance to play the role on many occasions. She then took over for Letty Lind in The Girl from Kays at the Apollo Theatre, earning good notices for her graceful, acrobatic dancing in particular. Next, she earned considerable fame playing Thisbe in the hit musical The Orchid (1903), where she danced in pink pyjamas while singing “The Pink Pyjama Girl”. She continued to appear in Edwardes’ productions in 1905 and 1906, including three successes at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre: Lady Madcap (1905, in which she performed a popular Parisian dance, “La Maxixe”), Lady Dorothy Congress in The Little Cherub (1906) and So-Hie in See See (1906). The same year she also played Eglé in Les merveilleuses.

In 1907, Ray played Frou Frou in Edwardes’ adaptation of The Merry Widow, which ran for 778 performances at Daly’s Theatre. Ray’s dance number, complete with handstands and high kicks, all performed on a table at Maxim’s held head high by four men, was a show stopper. Next she was Daisy in The Dollar Princess (1909) at Daly’s and Polly Polino in Peggy (1911) at the Gaiety.

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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intro_ill_thumb1Even the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

Here’s the Folk & Blues article

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intro_ill_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings.

The 11 thorough well written articles in “The Rock Primer” takes us through the most important of the different categories in popular music in the period 1945 – 1980.

The categories are:
Rock & Roll, Folk & Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Country, British Beat, California Sun, Dylan and after, Reggae, Punk and The seventies.

Here’s the Rock & Roll article

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From “The Rolling Stone Record Guide” published by Random House/Rolling Stone Press in 1979

intro_ill_rsrg_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings. This glossary may help you find your way in this label jungle. As you can see from the text above here this glossary is from 1979 and as this is a retro blog that works alright for me. Besides, any music styles that has emerged since then is of little interest to me, with the possible exception of neo-classic country. I’m sorry to say that dance, trance, hip-hop, rap and the rest simply don’t do it for me – Ted


You’ll find Glossary S HERE

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From “The Rolling Stone Record Guide” published by Random House/Rolling Stone Press in 1979

intro_ill_rsrg_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings. This glossary may help you find your way in this label jungle. As you can see from the text above here this glossary is from 1979 and as this is a retro blog that works alright for me. Besides, any music styles that has emerged since then is of little interest to me, with the possible exception of neo-classic country. I’m sorry to say that dance, trance, hip-hop, rap and the rest simply don’t do it for me – Ted


You’ll find the G-H Glossary HERE

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intro_ill_rsrg_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings. This glossary may help you find your way in this label jungle. As you can see from the text above here this glossary is from 1979 and as this is a retro blog that works alright for me. Besides, any music styles that has emerged since then is of little interest to me, with the possible exception of neo-classic country. I’m sorry to say that dance, trance, hip-hop, rap and the rest simply don’t do it for me – Ted


You’ll find Glossary E – F here

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intro_ill_rsrg_thumb1_thumbEven the most music interested among us can sometimes get lost in all the different labels music journalists and record companies choose to put on recordings. This glossary may help you find your way in this label jungle. As you can see from the text above here this glossary is from 1979 and as this is a retro blog that works alright for me. Besides, any music styles that has emerged since then is of little interest to me, with the possible exception of neo-classic country. I’m sorry to say that dance, trance, hip-hop, rap and the rest simply don’t do it for me – Ted


You’ll find Glossary C – D here

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T gospel

There’s been some time since I’ve posted on Retrorambling now and there have been several reasons for that, but there’s no need to list them here. Regular posting will start again to day and as usual there will be some weekly serial posts. Some new and some well known ones and they are:

Monday: Victorian Inventions
The industrial revolution made people in the Victorian age believe that almost anything was possible which brought on a flow of patents on the most hilarious contraptions. Flying devices that any half-wit with just a glance would see could never leave the ground and so on. In this series we’ll take a closer look at some of these patents.

Tuesday: The Softdrink Project
A well known feature for regular visitors. There are still tons of softdrinks and sodas out there that deserves a presentation and I need your help in both commenting on the ones presented and in finding more to feature.

Wednesday: Around Britain By Railway Posters
We’ve all seen those marvellous posters but we seldom bother to find out anything about the places they tell us to go to. In this series we will. I have gathered 52 images of British railway posters and for the next 52 weeks we will take a virtual visit to those 52 places. Starting in Aberdeen and ending up in Windsor.

Tuesday: Retro Recipes
Another well known feature for regular visitors. We’ll keep on posting fattening, unhealthy and downright life-threatening recipes from a time when butter and sugar was regarded as wholesome and beer was considered a better drink for children than water.

Friday: Pre-War Classics Of The Road
Starting in 1897 and ending up in 1935 we’ll take a look at some of the early classics of the road. At first I planned to post one car each week, but found that that would take me between three and four years so I  ended up posting four cars at the time 😉

Saturday: Granddaddy’s Sauce / Popular Music History 1945 – 1980
A double feature no less. Granddaddy’s Sauce will feature pre-war and older naughtiness, tackiness  and other frivolities taken from Ronnie Barker’s marvellous books “Sauce” and “Gentleman’s Relish” from the seventies.
Popular Music History 1945 – 1980 will feature both a Music Genre Vocabulary and a look at the different styles that were dominant in the period.

Sunday: Moxie – Our Sunday Comics / Girliemag Articles
And another double feature. Moxie is my own comic strip translated from Norwegian and will give you a look into the life of patrons, maids and owner of a small café in the poshest part of town. Girliemag Articles is a well known feature to regular visitors, but will now come regularly on Sundays.


Apart from the regular features there will of course be posted stuff on retro and vintage subjects of a great variety – It’s good to be back  – Ted 🙂

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I always wanted to be pretty. I wanted to look like the girl they called the town tramp. She wore tight clothes, too much make-up and had big yellow hair. I thought she was the prettiest thing I’d ever seen. People would say ‘oh, she’s just trash’, and I’d reply, “well, that’s what i’m going to be when I grow up. Trash”.

– Dolly Parton

Text and image found at”Queer Fat Femme Guide to the Net

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May be not the greatest singer around, but man, what a dancer – Ted

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