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Posts Tagged ‘German cars’

a121145
If it never needs repairs, why do they have complete spare part service

Image found on Casa de Ricardo

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The Glas Isar is a small two door four seater car produced by Hans Glas GmbH at their Dingolfing plant. The car was first presented as the Goggomobil T600 in September 1957 at the Frankfurt Motor Show, with volume production starting in August 1958.

Initially Glas described it simply as a “big Goggomobil”, but in Autumn 1959 it was rebranded as the Glas Isar. At the same time a kombi (estate car) version joined the range. A minor facelift occurred in August 1960 and the Isar continued in production till the end of Summer 1965.

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Origins

The car that appeared at the 1957 Frankfurt Motor Show was a prototype which in the event differed significantly from the car that entered production the next year, in that it used front wheel drive. In most other respects, notably regarding the two cylinder boxer engine and the overall shape of the car, only minor stylistic changes differentiated the cars that went into production in 1958 from the 1957 prototypes.

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The front wheel drive prototype was unstable, however, because of the way the engine was set far ahead of the front axle, and high above the front-wheel drive a1159_goggomobile t700_04power train, in what was a relatively light weight car. Setting the engine further back in relation to the front wheels would have involved a level of re-engineering for which neither time nor money were available. The decision was therefore taken to switch to a rear wheel drive configuration. The late decision led to issues with the gear box, however, which could not be redesigned at this stage and was simply switched round to allow for the fact that the drive shaft pointed in the opposite direction to that previously envisaged. For the driver, this gave rise to a back to front gear change, with first and third speed gear level positions nearer the driver and second and fourth positions facing the front of the car.

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The late switch to rear wheel drive threatened to reduce luggage space while freeing up space under the bonnet/hood above the low profile boxer engines, and the manufacturer took the opportunity to reposition the spare wheel to a location under the bonnet/hoot in a cradle above the engine.

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Goggomobil T 700

By the time volume production commenced in August 1958, the T600 had been joined by the more powerful T700. In this car the 688 cc boxer motor developed a maximum power output of 22 kW (30 PS) at 4,900 rpm, which provided for a top speed of 110 km/h (69 mph) and reduced by a third the acceleration time to 100 kmh (62 mph).

Text fro wikipedia

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In the period immediately after the Second World War, many talented people wanted to "have a go" at producing their own vehicle. One such was a certain M. Hoffmann from Munich who, from 1949 to 1951 came up with this extraordinary vehicle.

Its enormous width derives from its most interesting mechanical feature: its rear-wheel steering. A large triangular frame structure supporting the entire motor (ex Goliath Pionier) is pivoted at its forward end on a massive kingpin. A complex system of levers provides the steering, which moves the entire cradle from side to side in a wide arc.

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The result is a lethal cocktail of automotive engineering "don’t’s"- extreme front track width combined with an ultra-short wheelbase giving major straight line instability, and rear-wheel steering which can easily bring loss of control at any except very slow speeds, to which any fork-truck driver can attest.

The central position of the steering kingpin in the car means there is little room for the driver and passenger up front, and the original bench seat has been substituted for two smaller separate ones, allowing slightly better access to the cramped cabin over the wide sills.

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Perhaps this interesting and eccentric vehicle can be used to illustrate the reason why in this modern day one has a myriad of rules to contend with when building a vehicle.

Images and text from microcarmuseum.com

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Carl F. W. Borgward was an exceptional entrepreneur – the kind that easily survived the turmoil and upheaval of the second world war. Successful, headstrong, imaginative but ending up in a legendary bankruptcy in 1961, he had built virtually anything that might have four wheels and run on roads. His company made both cars and trucks, and in addition to the names Borgward and Goliath, Lloyd had the largest variety of post-war models of any German manufacturer.

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Starting with the LP 300 in 1950- a year after the company was set up – Lloyd became established very quickly. The LP 300, which was affectionately known as the "Leukoplastbomber" (band-aid bomber), came with a plywood body covered with imitation leather. The wheels were large, the car itself sufficiently fast, and it had enough room for four persons. It was therefore much better than some rather too intimate cars, like the Isetta or Heinkel Kabine. From 1951 forwards, the LP 300 was also available as a convertible, coupe, estate and minivan.

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In 1954 the lower part of the bodyshell was supplied in metal and in 1955 the whole body followed suit. The "S" in 400S stands for "steel" body.

By 1955 the Lloyd motor had reached a very grown-up 600 cc 4-stroke. The 400 2-stroke was delivered until 1957.

Lloyd tried to keep up with the Joneses in the car industry. However, like other ambitious projects of the Borgward parent company, it accumulated a large amount of debt. After the bankruptcy in 1961,the Bremen plant was taken over by Siemens, among others.

Text fra MicroCarMuseum

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In 1945, Hermann Holbein, a former development engineer for BMW, recovered his beloved BMW 327 sports car from the haystack where it had been interned and reluctantly gave it up to an American GI in trade for an Opel-Blitz army truck. He made a lucrative business out of picking up scrap metal and transporting various materials into a devastated country bent on cleaning up. He picked up a scrap BMW 328, rebuilt it, and Holbein made a name for himself as a successful racing driver for the next three years.

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Racing did not pay the bills, however, and he resolved to fill the post-war need for a small car, which he would design and sell the production rights to. A chance meeting with an old acquaintance, engineer Albert Maier of the gear-making firm ZF, brought together their individual interest in building a small car. In fact, Maier had already built a very basic open roadster with the backing of the ZF Company. In January 1949, Holbein came to a licensing agreement with ZF to build the car, raising the money by selling his three racing cars and two trucks. It would be called the Champion, with a nod to Holbein’s racing successes.

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Holbein and Maier saw the need for the development of the little car and worked out the design for a custom transaxle driving the rear wheels and incorporating inboard brakes. Meanwhile, the prototype used an Irus lawnmower gearbox. The new, stylish, aluminum body was found to be too expensive to make, so Holbein modeled a simpler body in clay, and his racing mechanic built it using a bent flat sheet and motorcycle fenders. Aluminum discs hid the tall wire wheels’ humble motorcycle origins. There was a single “Cyclops” headlight, and the 198-cubic centimeter Triumph motor, along with its cylindrical fuel tank, sat nakedly out in the open on the tail. It was called Champion CH-1, and it made its debut at the Reutlingen show in April 1949. Orders flooded in, but the vehicle was not yet ready.

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Development continued, and companies that could supply parts had to be found. The Hörz Company in Ulm made large clocks for clock towers, and they agreed to make the transaxles. The new ZF transaxle was incorporated into the two upgraded CH-2 prototypes, along with a new Triumph 248-cubic centimeter motor used as a stationary engine in farm applications, which was now under a louvered cover. Bosch in Stuttgart supplied the generators, Continental in Hannover supplied the tires, Schleicher in Munich supplied the hubs, and Hella in Lippstadt supplied the lamps. Former aircraft builder Böbel had a press, and they agreed to do the body shells.

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Production of the CH-2 got underway, and the press was enthusiastic about the new, small roadster. The first cars made it clear that the transaxle was not up to the job. The Hörz people refused responsibility, but ZF stepped in to help. In addition, teething problems with breaking in the front and rear suspension elements caused Holbein to take the drastic action of recalling all cars sold to date and refurbishing and upgrading the chassis to the latest specifications. The public’s faith in the new car was not shaken.

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The CH-2 became the CH-250 in March 1950, with a new twin-piston motor, a split windshield, bumpers, and smaller wheels. This model would lead to the charming Champion 400 coupe and eventually to the Maico 500 sedan. Perhaps two of these CH-2 cars exist worldwide. The bare metal bodywork of this exceptionally rare car was completely remade by a master metalworker, and it was restored by the museum’s in-house staff; it runs and drives just as well as it looks.

Text and images from RMauctions

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The hierarchy of the Auto Union empire was already clear in the early thirty’s: DKW for the lower middle class, Wanderer for the middle class, Audi for upper middle class and Horch for the rich.

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Wanderer W22 C

Workers and officials could perhaps aspire for a DKW, or perhaps more preferably a used one. Hitler promised as someone might remember, a new KDF – Wagen to everyone, including the workers, but it was just promises. Life in Germany in the twenty’s – and thirty’s was harder than in many other countries.

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Wanderer was not a new mark in the new empire, but a factory dating back to 1885. The first car arrived in 1912 and was nicknamed "Puppchen". It was a popular small car which was also sold here in Norway . The first company was named after the founders: Winkel Hofer & Jaenicke AG in Chemnitz, and dealt among other things with bicycle production, as so many upcoming car factories.

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Over investments in new models and new factory pressed the firm’s liquidity and made the bank take over the control after the depression in 1929. In Germany crises came on a conveyor belt already in the twenties so Audi, Horch and DKW had already suffered the same fate. The result was that DKW, in horch_image41928, took over the Audi with the banks blessing without the bank giving them all the control. In 1932 Wanderer joined as the final mark in the Auto Union and the four rings in the brand , which still exist on the Audi, was a fact.

From an article in “Motor Veteran” No 5 – 2007
Text and photo: Gunnar Hege Haug

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