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Archive for the ‘Rock’n’roll’ Category

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……  quite much actually

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Elvis’ Palm Springs Honeymoon Home for Sale

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The ultimate Elvis pad is now up for sale in sunny Palm Springs, California – complete with Rock ‘n’ Roll memorabilia. In 1962, Look Magazine featured the estate calling it the “House of Tomorrow” due to its forward-thinking decor. Oh, and Lisa Marie was most likely conceived here. In 1966 this historic mid-century house was leased to Elvis Presley and Priscilla for around $21,000 to spend their honeymoon. The original lease actually still hangs on one of the walls. The house is designed around four perfect circles on three levels and features four bedrooms and five bathrooms. It is nestled in at the base of the San Jacinto Mountains which the honeymoon suite offers a panoramic view of. There is also a pool, tennis court and a fruit orchard among many other features.

The house is currently owned by ‘Elvis junkie’ M.L. Lewis which purchased it in 1987 for under $500,000. It has since then been restored to its 1960s splendor and features art deco design and furnishings throughout. The house is currently a museum, open to tourists on the weekends and comes packed with various Elvis memorabilia – which the buyer gets to keep. Fans might recognize it from the film “Elvis And Me” and the documentary “Elvis By the Presley”, starring Priscilla Presley herself. So any Elvis fan with a really deep pocket who’s in the market for the ultimate Elvis Presley time-capsule will most likely have found the best one around. More information about this property can be found the real estate agent Hilton & Hyland.

Text and image from UltraSwank 

Nice pad, but there are actually not one real Art Deco object in sight – Ted

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Who wouldn’t want a couple of armless Elvis Presley half torsos to lighten up the living room. Particularly a couple as terribly tastelessly designed as these. Two slightly recognizable Elvis Presleys with an equally tasteless lamp shade on top would be the pride of any half blind Presley fan’s living room – 44 presidents and only two kings – Ted

Image found at beatnikdaddio

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Elvis trying to revive a female fan who swooned at the sight of him. The hysteria surrounding Elvis Presley in the mid-50s was unbelievable.

Image and text found on Q’s Daydream Inspirations…

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October 28, 1956 – On this day a HUGE Elvis cut-out on top of Paramount‘s marquee was unveiled. On the photo you can see that the cut-out is about to be covered up. The movie would not premiere until 2,5 weeks later. So in the weeks that followed, this cardboard Elvis Presley would take control of Times Square.

At the big premiere of Elvis’ first movie at the Paramount Theatre in New York. No expenses were spared in order to launch Elvis’ movie career and further deepen his already meteoric rise to fame in late 1956. He seemed to be all over the place at the same time (either in the flesh or in a cardboard version). And Elvis had now also arrived in Hollywood. Due to the clever marketing schemes by Presley’s management, Elvis ruled the media. And not just on the east coast!

Young girls were picketing outside the cinema the whole 2,5 weeks and apart from the signs mentioning local Elvis Fan Clubs, all other signs were clearly not a product of homemade creativity but merely the result of the very clever marketing scheme thought out by one Tom Parker.

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On the same day Elvis performed on the Ed Sullivan Show. The same fans, with the same signs, wearing the same EPE hats, lined up outside Studio 50 while Elvis was rehearsing. Way to go Colonel!

Text and images from ELVIS – Echoes Of The Past

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I’ve been listening to Afro-American music for nearly 50 years. And worst, I’ve enjoyed every minute of it – Ted

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BLACK HISTORY IN IMAGES: New Orleans in 1960 was sharply divided over the practice of segregation, and the “Citizens’ Council of Greater New Orleans” advocated some pretty silly stuff, including a protest against black musicians. Please share so we may never forget! Image and text from BlackPast.org

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I guess the prospect of having him on your lips has lost most of it’s fascination by now. He’s not exactly excitingly alive anymore – Ted

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Ella Mae Morse (September 12, 1924 – October 16, 1999) was an American popular singer. Morse blended jazz, country, pop, and R&B.

Career
M
orse was born in Mansfield, Texas, United States. She was hired by Jimmy Dorsey when she was 14 years old. Dorsey believed she was 19, and when he was informed by the school board that he was now responsible for her care, he fired her. In 1942, at the age of 17, she joined Freddie Slack’s band, with whom in the same year she recorded "Cow Cow Boogie", Capitol Records’ first gold single. "Mr. Five by Five" was also recorded by Morse with Slack, and they had a hit recording with the song in 1942 (Capitol 115). She also originated the wartime hit "Milkman, Keep Those Bottles Quiet", which was later popularized by Nancy Walker in the film, Broadway Rhythm.

In 1943, Morse began to record solo. She reached #1 in the R&B chart with "Shoo-Shoo Baby" in December for two weeks. In the same year she performed "Cow Cow Boogie" in the film Reveille with Beverly and starred in Universal’s South of Dixie and The Ghost Catchers with Olsen and Johnson and How Do You Dooo? with radio’s Mad Russian, Bert Gordon. She sang in a wide variety of styles, and she had hits on both the U.S. pop and rhythm and blues charts. However, she never received the popularity of a major star because her versatility prevented her from being placed into any one category of music.

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The next 7 days you’ll find all tracks from
this LP in the box widget in the right column

In 1943, Morse began to record solo. She reached #1 in the R&B chart with "Shoo-Shoo Baby" in December for two weeks. In the same year she performed "Cow Cow Boogie" in the film Reveille with Beverly and starred in Universal’s South of Dixie and The Ghost Catchers with Olsen and Johnson and How Do You Dooo? with radio’s Mad Russian, Bert Gordon. She sang in a wide variety of styles, and she had hits on both the U.S. pop and rhythm and blues charts. However, she never received the popularity of a major star because her versatility prevented her from being placed into any one category of music.

The song "Love Me or Leave Me" as recorded by Morse was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 1922, with the flip side "Blacksmith Blues", which became her biggest hit.

In 1946, "House of Blue Lights" by Freddie Slack and Morse, (written by Slack and Raye) saw them perform what was one of many of Raye’s songs picked up by black R&B artists. Her biggest solo success was "Blacksmith Blues" in 1952, which sold over one 238_ellea Mae Morse_0032million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. The same year her version of "Down the Road a Piece" appeared on Capitol with Slack again on piano accompaniment. Morse also recorded a version of "Oakie Boogie" for Capitol which reached #23 in 1952. Her version was one of the first songs arranged by Nelson Riddle.

Morse ceased recording in 1957, but continued performing until the early 1990s at such clubs as Michael’s Pub in New York, Ye Little Club in Beverly Hills, the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel’s Cinegrill and the Vine St. Bar and Grill. She appeared regularly at Disneyland for several years with the Ray McKinley Orchestra, and did a successful tour of Australia shortly before her final illness.

Her music career was profiled in Nick Tosches’ 1984 book, The Unsung Heroes of Rock ‘N’ Roll: The Birth of Rock in the Wild Years Before Elvis. She has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1724 Vine Street. Her entire recorded body of work was issued in a deluxe box set by Bear Family Records.

Musical style
As Morse’s musical style blended jazz, blues, and country, she has sometimes been called the first rock ‘n’ roll singer. A good example is her 1942 recording of the song "Get On Board, Little Chillun", which, with strong gospel, blues, boogie, and jive sounds as a genuine precursor to the later rockabilly/ rock ‘n roll songs. Her records sold well to both Caucasian and African-American audiences. As she was not well known at the time of her first solo hits, many people assumed she was African-American because of her ‘hip’ vocal style and choice of material.

Hit singles

Year Single US Chart position Label Catalog #
1942 "Cow Cow Boogie" 9 Capitol 102
"Mr. Five by Five" 10 Capitol 115
1943 "Get On Board Little Chillun" 17 (R&B) Capitol 133
"Shoo Shoo Baby" 4 Capitol 143
1944 "No Love, No Nothin’" 4 Capitol 143
"Tess’ Torch Song" 11 Capitol 151
"Milkman, Keep Those Bottles Quiet" 7 Capitol 151
"The Patty Cake Man" 10 Capitol 163
1945 "Captain Kidd" 17 Capitol 193
1946 "Buzz Me" 15 Capitol 226
"The House of Blue Lights" 8 (R&B) Capitol 251
1952 "The Blacksmith Blues" 3 Capitol 1922
"Oakie Boogie" 23 Capitol

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1953 "40 Cups of Coffee" 26 Capitol 2539

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Rock and roll (often written as rock & roll or rock ‘n’ roll) is a genre of popular music that originated and evolved in the United States during the late 1940s and early 1950s, primarily from a combination of African American blues, country, jazz, and gospel music. Though elements of rock and roll can be heard in country records of the 1930s, and in blues records from the 1920s, rock and roll did not acquire its name until the 1950s.

117294_ep2The term "rock and roll" now has at least two different meanings, both in common usage. The American Heritage Dictionary and the Merriam-Webster Dictionary both define rock and roll as synonymous with rock music. Encyclopædia Britannica, on the other hand, regards it as the music that originated in the mid-1950s and later developed "into the more encompassing international style known as rock music." For the purpose of differentiation, this article uses the second definition.

In the earliest rock and roll styles of the late 1940s and early 1950s, either the piano or saxophone was often the lead instrument, but these were generally replaced or supplemented by guitar in the middle to late 1950s. The beat is essentially a blues rhythm with an accentuated backbeat, the latter almost always provided by a snare drum. Classic rock and roll is usually played with one or two electric guitars (one lead, one rhythm), a string bass or (after the mid-1950s) an electric bass guitar, and a drum kit.

117294_ep3Rock and roll began achieving wide popularity in the 1960s. The massive popularity and eventual worldwide view of rock and roll gave it a widespread social impact. Bobby Gillespie writes that "When Chuck Berry sang ‘Hail, hail, rock and roll, deliver me from the days of old,’ that’s exactly what the music was doing. Chuck Berry started the global psychic jailbreak that is rock’n’roll."

Far beyond simply a musical style, rock and roll, as seen in movies and on television, influenced lifestyles, fashion, attitudes, and language. It went on to spawn various sub-genres, often without the initially characteristic backbeat, that are now more commonly called simply "rock music" or "rock."

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper killed in air crash

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Three young rock ‘n’ roll stars have been killed in a plane crash in the United States. Buddy Holly, 22, Jiles P Richardson – known as the Big Bopper – 28, and Ritchie Valens, 17, died in a crash shortly after take-off from Clear Lake, Iowa at 0100 local time. The pilot of the single-engined Beechcraft Bonanza plane was also killed. Early reports from the scene suggest the aircraft spun out of control during a light snowstorm.Only the pilot’s body was found inside the wreckage as the performers were thrown clear on impact.

Holly hired the plane after heating problems developed on his tourbus. All three were travelling to Moorhead, Minnesota, the next venue in their Winter Dance Party Tour Holly had set up the gruelling schedule of concerts – covering 24 cities in three weeks – to make money after the break-up of his band, The Crickets, last year.

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Recorded life
Born Charles Hardin Holley – changed to Holly after a misspelling on a contract – he had several hit records, including a number one, in the US and UK with That’ll be the Day in 1957. A singer and guitarist, he was inspired by Elvis Presley after seeing him at an early concert in his home town of Lubbock, Texas. With Presley serving in the Army, some critics expected Holly to take over his crown.

Richard Valenzuela was the first Mexican American to break into mainstream music, after being discovered by record producer Bob Keane, who changed his name to Ritchie Valens. He had made three albums and achieved a number two chart position in the US with his composition Donna – about his girlfriend – in 1958. His rock ‘n’ roll re-working of the traditional Mexican song La Bamba – on the B-side of Donna – has also received acclaim.

 The Big Bopper had been a record-breaking radio DJ – with a 122-hour marathon stint – and reached number six in the American charts with his record Chantilly Lace.

In Context
Buddy Holly and, to a lesser extent, Ritchie Valens became musical legends. Don McLean immortalised the tragedy with his 1972 hit American Pie. Holly is often described as the most influential of the early rock ‘n’ roll musicians, and has been cited as such by John Lennon and Paul McCartney of the Beatles.

His producer Norman Petty released demo tracks Holly recorded before his death. Various re-workings and compilation albums have appeared in the years since. Holly was commemorated in the musical Buddy which opened in London in 1986.

Mexican American group Los Lobos achieved a hit with La Bamba when they collaborated on the 1987 film of the same name, a biography of Ritchie Valens.

Text from BBc home’s On This Day

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While do-gooders shout that he’s fulfilling sex urges with his R & R cult, Bill insists he just provides fun for the youngsters.
Recreated from an article by Leonard Bennett in Cabaret Magazine No 5 from 1956

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Bille Haley beats out a tune on his guitar while his saxophonist curls on the floor to blow at on of his rock’n’roll concerts.

WHAT "23 skiddoo" and "Oh you kid" were to the roaring 20’s, such expressions as "See you later, alligator" and" After a while, crocodile" have become to the frantic 50’s. They are a product of the rock ‘n’ roll era, a mad, boisterous, wild binge of erotic music that has the younger generation bouncing about in delirium shouting hosannahs for the high priest of the cult, a cool, calculated gent named Bill Haley who is bound to make 8 cool, calculated million before the rock ‘n’ roll craze dies.

There are those who believe rock ‘n’ roll is some kind of new phenomenon that is responsible for all the juvenile delinquents in the land. They are claiming that the 2 R’s are replacing the 3 R’s for teenagers.

Another crowd sees in rock en’ roll the sinister hand of what they call the "integrationists," people who want to end the color line in the South. And in some parts of Dixie, pickets have actually patrolled outside halls where rock en’ roll has been played.

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Varied reactions of girl fans to R & R is seen in these two girls, on almost about to cry and the other laughing hystericlly in respons to Bill Haleys hot tunes.

But the sane, sober musicologists who follow the history of rhythm slate very simply that rock ‘n’ roll is no more and no less than what it sounds like-good music. Actually its ancestry goes back through varying schools of jazz beginning with Dixieland and tracing its way through swing, bebop and cool. If anything, rock ‘n’ roll is basically a graduate school of swing with the same fundamental beat and even Bill Haley might admit that in private.

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Happy Birthday Elvis

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Elvis Aaron Presley (8. January 1935 – 16. August 1977)

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116796_alAlis Lesley is a former American rockabilly singer, once billed as "the female Elvis Presley."

Lesley was born Alice Lesley in Chicago, Illinois on April 20, 1938. Her family later moved to Phoenix, Arizona, where she attended Phoenix Junior College. She majored in television and radio, and began singing rockabilly while a student. She was discovered by Kathryn Godfrey, a popular Phoenix television personality and the sister of Arthur Godfrey. With Ms. Godfrey’s help, Lesley became a local favorite following her appearances on television station KTVK and in local night clubs.

Lesley achieved brief national celebrity with the 1957 release of her Era single, "He Will Come Back to Me" b/w "Heartbreak Harry" (Era Records 45-1034). Lesley’s stage persona as "The Female Elvis Presley" included a guitar slung around her neck, greased-back hair, and combed-down sideburns.

She toured Australia in October 1957 with Little Richard, Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent and local rocker Johnny O’Keefe.. The tour was cut short when Richard underwent a "religious experience" and he retired from rock’n’roll for several years.
Text from
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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11321_el2Article from BBC on this day
Elvis Presley, whose singing and style revolutionized popular music in the 1950s, has died. Presley, 42, was discovered slumped in a bathroom at his mansion in Memphis, Tennessee on Tuesday. He was rushed to the Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis but was pronounced dead on arrival.

The Tennessee state pathologist, Dr. Jerry Francisco, said a post mortem examination of the singer’s body had revealed he died of cardiac arrhythmia – a form of heart attack. "The precise cause has not yet been determined for the cardiac arrhythmia," Dr Francisco said. "It may take several days to several weeks to determine that specific cause and in some cases it never is determined."

The three-hour examination uncovered no sign of any other diseases or any drug abuse, Dr Francisco added.

11321_el1Declining health
Presley was divorced from his wife Priscilla in 1973 but it was rumoured that he had recently become engaged to Ginger Alden, 20. She was reportedly spotted wearing a $50,000 (£20,315) diamond engagement ring from Presley. Ms Alden and other members of his entourage were at Graceland when he collapsed.

There had been indications of Elvis Presley’s declining health for some time. Earlier this year the singer had cancelled several performances in Louisiana and returned to Memphis suffering what his doctors termed "exhaustion". No arrangements have been announced yet for his funeral which is scheduled for Friday.

In Context
Thousands gathered to file past Elvis Presley’s body which lay in state at his mansion, Graceland, the day after his death.

Although it was officially stated that he died of heart failure there has always been speculation that an overdose of cocaine and barbiturates also played a part.

Since his divorce from Priscilla in 1973 he had relied heavily on prescription drugs and was known to be a junk-food addict, gaining a considerable amount of weight.

During his lifetime he sold over 300 million albums and made 33 films.

His death has been lucrative for the "Elvis industry".

In 2001 he came top in US magazine Forbes’ poll of "Richest Deceased Celebrities".

It put Elvis estate’s earnings in 2000 at $35m (£23m) – $15m (£10m) of it from Graceland admission fees.

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Article and images from the Hokey Ass Message Board HAMB
11308_af4Alan Freed or "Moondog" was a notable DJ. He coined the phrase "Rock and Roll". He once said: "Rock ‘n’ roll is really swing with a modern name. It began on the levees and plantations, took in folk songs, and features blues and rhythm. It’s the rhythm that gets to the kids – they’re starved of music they can dance to, after all those years of crooners." Freed promoted dances and concerts featuring the music he was playing on the radio. Freed’s popularity made the pop music business sit up and take notice. Life magazine credited Freed as the originator of the rock ‘n roll craze.

Freed had his share of controversy. Freed, during a "Rock and Roll" show in Boston told the audience, "The police don’t want you to have fun." As a result, Freed was arrested and charged with inciting to riot. In 1957, Freed was given a weekly prime-time TV series, The Big Beat,(which predated American Bandstand) on ABC, which was scheduled for a Summer run, with the understanding that if there were enough viewers, the show would continue into the 1957-58 television season. Although the ratings for the first three episodes were strong, the show was suddenly canceled after the fourth episode. During that episode, Frankie Lymon of Frankie Lymon and The Teenagers, after performing his number, was seen dancing with a white girl from the studio audience. Reportedly, the incident offended the management of ABC’s local affiliates in the southern states, and led to the show’s immediate cancellation despite its growing popularity.

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Freed’s career ended when it was shown that he had accepted payola (payments from record companies to play specific records), a practice that was highly controversial at the time. There was also a conflict of interest, that he had taken songwriting co-credits (most notably on Chuck Berry’s "Maybellene"), which entitled him to receive part of a song’s royalties, which he could help increase by heavily promoting the record on his own program.

11308_af1Freed lost his own show on the radio station WABC; then he was fired from the station altogether. He also was fired from his television show (which for a time continued with a different host). In 1960, payola was made illegal. In 1962, Freed pleaded guilty to two charges of commercial bribery, for which he received a fine and a suspended sentence.

Although the punishment handed down to Freed was not severe, the side effects of negative publicity were such that no prestigious station would employ him, and he moved to the West Coast in 1960, where he worked at KDAY-AM in Santa Monica, CA.. In 1962, after KDAY refused to allow him to promote "rock and roll" stage shows, Freed moved to WQAM in Miami, FL., but that association lasted two months.

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He died in a Palm Springs, CA. hospital in 1965 from uremia and cirrhosis brought on by alcoholism. He was 43 years old.

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Pic of Little Richard found on “I’ve had dreams like this” and the owner had added this text to it:

As a boy, they called him War Hawk for his singing voice. At 10 he became a faith healer, before joining the circus to perform as "drag baby" Princess Lavonne. Women threw their panties at him on stage and his mixed race, hotel room orgies have become the stuff of legend. They say he had a threesome with Buddy Holly. When he played, white kids were leaping off the balconies to get down into the dancing, shouting, black crowd in the segregated floor seats. At 25, he quit secular music to become a preacher, and when he came back to rock, The Beatles opened for his return tour. All before 1965. Elvis? Elvis was a talented puppet, a cover artist, an acceptable rebel. Little Richard Penniman fucked gospel and r&b and blues and honky tonk and gave birth to rock’n’roll.


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Alis Lesley was an American rockabilly singer, once billed as "the female Elvis Presley."

Lesley was born Alice Lesley in Chicago, Illinois on April 20, 1938. Her family later moved to Phoenix, Arizona, where she attended Phoenix Junior College. She majored in television and radio, and began singing rockabilly while a student. She was discovered by Kathryn Godfrey, a popular Phoenix television personality and the sister of Arthur Godfrey. With Ms. Godfrey’s help, Lesley became a local favorite following her appearances on television station KTVK and in local night clubs.

Lesley achieved brief national celebrity with the 1957 release of her Era single, "He Will Come Back to Me" b/w "Heartbreak Harry" (Era Records 45-1034). Lesley’s stage persona as "The Female Elvis Presley" included a guitar slung around her neck, greased-back hair, and combed-down sideburns.

She toured Australia in October 1957 with Little Richard, Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent and local rocker Johnny O’Keefe. The tour was cut short when Richard underwent a "religious experience" and he retired from rock’n’roll for several years.

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And who would have thought that the king himself was the one to end up with the famous pimp cane. Probably to get back at Will Sasso for those marvellous Presley sketches in the early seasons of MADtv. I’ll never forget the scene from the back seat of the Cadillac where the king told his old friends that a hotdog had told him he was going to die on the crapper. “Well at least your going out in style, El” one of his friends commented. Image found at Portal 99

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BEWARE the hypnotic voodoo rhythm, a reckless dance down the devil’s road of sin and self-destruction, leading to eternal damnation in the fiery depth of hell!”

Well, it’s a good thing I’m not a believer, I’ve been listening to rock’n’roll since I was just a kid. And I guess the crap about sin and self-destruction only goes for believers, I haven’t noticed anything at least.

Image found at:
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Rosetta Tharpe (March 20, 1915 – October 9, 1973) was a pioneering gospel singer, songwriter and recording artist who attained great popularity in the 1930s and 1940s with a unique mixture of spiritual lyrics and early rock and roll accompaniment. She became the first great recording star of gospel music in the late 1930s and also became known as the "original soul sister" of recorded music.

Willing to cross the line between sacred and secular by performing her inspirational music of ‘light’ in the ‘darkness’ of the nightclubs and concert halls with big bands behind her, her witty, idiosyncratic style also left a lasting mark on more conventional gospel artists, such as Ira Tucker, Sr., of the Dixie Hummingbirds. While she offended some conservative churchgoers with her forays into the world of pop music, she never left gospel music. Text from Wikipedia 

Video found at:
RetroYouTube
Image found at:
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